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ePub Mommy, My Head Hurts: A Doctor's Guide to Your Child's Headache (Newmarket Parenting Guide) download

by Sarah Cheyette M.D.

ePub Mommy, My Head Hurts: A Doctor's Guide to Your Child's Headache (Newmarket Parenting Guide) download
Author:
Sarah Cheyette M.D.
ISBN13:
978-1557045355
ISBN:
1557045356
Language:
Publisher:
William Morrow Paperbacks (August 30, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Medicine
ePub file:
1408 kb
Fb2 file:
1134 kb
Other formats:
txt rtf lrf mbr
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
379

Mommy, My Head Hurts A Doctor's Guide to Your Child's Headache Newmarket Parenting Guide.

Mommy, My Head Hurts A Doctor's Guide to Your Child's Headache Newmarket Parenting Guide.

Mommy, My Head Hurts book. Start by marking Mommy, My Head Hurts: A Doctor's Guide to Your Child's Headache as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Reassuring and authoritative, Dr. Sarah Cheyette, a pediatric neurologist and mother of two young children, helps parents navigate the . Mass Market rdcoverMass Market rdcover. Sarah Cheyette, a pediatric neurologist and mother of two young children, helps parents navigate the sometimes frightening world.

Mommy, my head hurts It’s time to go to school, but your child’s still in bed-with another headache. completed her training in pediatric neurology at the University of Washington and Seattle Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center. What’s a parent to do? Mommy.

and a valuable sample headache diary, Mommy, My Head Hurts belongs on every parenting bookshelf.

and the. headache still isn't going away? Filled with case studies drawn from her own practice, resources, diagrams, and a valuable sample headache diary, Mommy, My Head Hurts belongs on every parenting bookshelf.

Headaches in children aren't usually serious, and can often be managed with . Book: Mayo Clinic Guide to Pain Relief.

Headaches in children aren't usually serious, and can often be managed with medications and healthy habits. It's important to pay attention to your child's headache symptoms and consult a doctor if the headache worsens or occurs frequently. Headaches in children usually can be treated with over-the-counter pain medications and healthy habits such as a regular schedule for sleeping and eating. Products & Services. Children get the same types of headaches adults do, but their symptoms may be a little different.

Mommy, My Head Hurts A Doctor's Guide to Your Child's Headache. Newmarket Parenting Guide. Dr. Sarah Cheyette, a pediatric neurologist and mother of two young children, gives attention to a serious need: helping parents and caregivers of children from infants to teenagers understand and deal with headache pain, treat it with and/or without medication, and keep it from controlling their child's life as well as their own. In a clear, lively, easy-to-understand style, with case studies, resources, diagrams, and a valuable sample headache diary, Dr. Cheyette answers such pressing questions as: • How can I identify and treat pain in my baby?

Mommy, My Head Hurts.

Mommy, My Head Hurts. Tell us if something is incorrect. From a sympathetic pediatric neurologist comes a book for the parents of children with headaches to help them deal with their child's pain and improve the quality of life for their entire family.

is a Palo Alto Medical Foundation pediatric neurologist and the author of Mommy, My Head Hurts: A Doctor's Guide to Your Child's Headache

is a Palo Alto Medical Foundation pediatric neurologist and the author of Mommy, My Head Hurts: A Doctor's Guide to Your Child's Headache. Cheyette often sees children and teens for headache pain and says the vast majority of their headaches are completely benign. They’re also quite treatable. Studies show that by age 15 more than 80 percent of kids say they’ve had a headache. Head pain can happen after a minor head injury or be part of an illness, such as a virus, strep throat or sinus infection.

Pediatric neurologist Sarah Cheyette has written a parents' guide to understanding children's headaches. The book, Mommy, My Head Hurts, will be released later this summer by Newmarket Press of . Norton & Company. Cheyette is a UW clinical instructor in neurology. She received her training at the UW and Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center. Her book covers how youngsters respond to pain differently from adults, as well as how a child's developmental stage can affect pain reactions.

Reassuring and authoritative, Dr. Sarah Cheyette, a pediatric neurologist and mother of two young children, helps parents navigate the sometimes frightening world of a child’s headache pain, and offers advice on symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and how to deal with doctors.

In a clear, lively, easy-to-understand style, Dr. Cheyette answers parents’ most pressing questions:

How can I identify and treat pain in my baby? My toddler? My teen?What are the possible causes of my child’s headache?What medications and nondrugtherapies are available for my child’s pain?How can I prepare my child for a doctor’s visit?What questions should my doctor ask to ensure an accurate diagnosis of my child’s headache?What are our options if we’ve already seen a doctor…and the headache still isn’t going away?

Filled with case studies drawn from her own practice, resources, diagrams, and a valuable sample headache diary, Mommy, My Head Hurts belongs on every parenting bookshelf.

  • My son has chronic migraines so I purchased this book. I am so happy that I found such a valuble resource! The author does a great job describing different types of headaches, triggers, and potential therapeutic measures that can be taken to alleviate the pain. Most importantly, the author presents the information without scaring the parent. That was very important to me. I think this is a great book and I would highly recommend it.

  • A good bock to education any parent about children's headaches. As a migraine headache sufferer myself, I am all too familar with the symptoms, but with children, the symptoms can display a bit different. And if the primary caregiver is not familar with migraines but has a child who does, this is a must have book.

  • This is probably the most easy to understand books I have read on childhood headaches. It is an easy read and makes a complicated topic simple to understand. I would highly recommend this book to mom's out there who think there's a little more to their child's headaches. By the time you're done reading you will have a good background to talk with your child's pediatrician.

    I have also used "The Headache Detective" workbook as a diary to track both my girls' headaches. The Headache Detective; by John Ricker has helped us more than any other book in really finding the foods my daughters were eating that were triggering there headaches. It cost a little more than other books but not needing to put together my own diary was well worth the money.