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ePub Family matters: Designing, analysing and understanding family based studies in life course epidemiology (A Life Course Approach to Adult Health) download

by Deborah A. Lawlor,Gita D. Mishra

ePub Family matters: Designing, analysing and understanding family based studies in life course epidemiology (A Life Course Approach to Adult Health) download
Author:
Deborah A. Lawlor,Gita D. Mishra
ISBN13:
978-0199231034
ISBN:
0199231036
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 16, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Medicine
ePub file:
1791 kb
Fb2 file:
1530 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
868

Family-based studies can provide a more comprehensive view of life course epidemiology than studies that do not engage with family effects

Family-based studies can provide a more comprehensive view of life course epidemiology than studies that do not engage with family effects. They can establish intergenerational associations, help to understand the influence that one family member can have on the health and wellbeing of another family member and they can help to unravel the mechanisms behind the relationships of genetic, social, and environmental factors that impact on health at different life stages

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2010, Myriam Khlat and others published Family Matters.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2010, Myriam Khlat and others published Family Matters. Got it. We value your privacy.

Start by marking Family Matters: Designing, Analysing and Understanding Family Based Studies in Life Course Epidemiology as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Life course epidemiology was one of several new conceptual models of. .Kuh D, Hardy R (2003) A life course approach to women’s health. Mishra GD, Lawlor DA (2009) The future of family-based studies in life course epidemiology: challenges and opportunities.

Life course epidemiology was one of several new conceptual models of epidemiological thinking that began to emerge in the 1980s and 1990s and that are now mainstream paradigms in social epidemiology (Susser 1985; Susser and Susser 1996a; Krieger and Zierler 1997; McMichael 1999), though its concepts have been applied more generally to chronic disease etiology. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar.

Family-based studies, including intergenerational, sibling, and twin studies, are increasingly being used to explore life course epidemiology. Professor Deborah A. Lawlor completed medical training (University of Bristol) in 1986. However, there are issues relating to study design and the statistical analysis of family-based studies that are still not well understood, and comprehending the underlying assumptions of these studies and drawing the inferences from them can be complex. This book provides the knowledge and skills required to design, analyse, and correctly interpret family-based studies.

The development of these models in life course epidemiology provides a persuasive rationale for time related study designs.

Psychologists,1 sociologists,2, 3 demographers,4 anthropologists,5 and biologists6 have actively promoted such an approach for many years. The development of these models in life course epidemiology provides a persuasive rationale for time related study designs.

Family based studies, including intergenerational, sibling and twin studies, are . Deborah A. Lawlor and Gita D. Mishra. Part IV Some illustrative examples of the use of family-based studies in life course epidemiology.

Family based studies, including intergenerational, sibling and twin studies, are increasingly used to explore life course epidemiology. However, understanding the underlying assumptions of these studies and hence the inferences that can be drawn from them is complex. Further, there are issues relating to study design and the statistical analysis of family-based studies that are not well understood. Chapter 13 Family-based studies applied to the influence of early life factors on cardiovascular disease.

Family-based studies, including intergenerational, sibling, and twin . Designing, analysing and understanding family based studies in life course epidemiology. A Life Course Approach to Adult Health.

In epidemiology, a life course approach is being used to study the physical and social hazards during gestation .

In epidemiology, a life course approach is being used to study the physical and social hazards during gestation, childhood, adolescence, young adulthood and midlife that affect chronic disease risk and health outcomes in later life. It aims to identify the underlying biological, behavioural and psychosocial processes that operate across the life span (Kuh and Ben-Shlomo, 1997). A life course approach to adult health is not a new concept – the idea that experiences in earlier life shape adult health, was the prevailing model of public health in the rst half of the twentieth century.

A life course approach to understanding social drivers of rangeland . A life course approach to understanding social drivers of rangeland. our coding on several broad categories based on concepts and principles that ranch, coupled with the difficulty or expense of hiring regular php/8990. The life course approach, which involves studying life histories and trajectories, is not new to other disciplines.

Family-based studies, including intergenerational, sibling, and twin studies, are increasingly being used to explore life course epidemiology. However, there are issues relating to study design and the statistical analysis of family-based studies that are still not well understood, and comprehending the underlying assumptions of these studies and drawing the inferences from them can be complex. This book provides the knowledge and skills required to design, analyse, and correctly interpret family-based studies. It explains what these studies can tell us about life course epidemiology; provides practical guidance on how to set-up and maintain birth cohorts for completing family-based studies in life course epidemiology; describes how to undertake appropriate statistical analyses of family-based studies and correctly interpret results from these analyses; and provides examples that illustrate the ways in which family-based studies can enhance our understanding of life course epidemiology. In addition, there is discussion of difficulties specific to setting up such studies in low- and middle-income countries, and issues relating to proxy informants, where parents provide information on children and vice versa, or siblings provide information about each other. Examples of how family-based studies have been used in understanding the life course epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, mental health, and reproductive health illustrate the applicability of the research to these areas, but also more generally to the wider field of life course epidemiology.