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ePub On the Sweet Spot: Stalking the Effortless Present download

by Richard Keefe

ePub On the Sweet Spot: Stalking the Effortless Present download
Author:
Richard Keefe
ISBN13:
978-0743223355
ISBN:
0743223357
Language:
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (March 11, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Medicine
ePub file:
1831 kb
Fb2 file:
1525 kb
Other formats:
doc rtf mobi azw
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
681

On the Sweet Spot is filled with helpful thoughts and good ideas. I've seen Dr. Keefe provide great benefit to athletes for years, and I'm tremendously impressed with how clearly his concepts come through on every page.

On the Sweet Spot is filled with helpful thoughts and good ideas. We all need this book! Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi author of Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience An ambitious weaving together of spiritual enlightenment, the game of golf, and the functioning of the brain, in a personal narrative packed with original insights. I heartily recommend this book to any golfer, athlete, or anyone who has always wondered about the source of excellence in all of us.

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Coming from someone who knows so much about how the brain works and who also has practical experience with teaching others how to find the effortless present.

book by Richard Keefe. Like most moments of spiritual revelation, this one took place on a landfill in New Jersey. Keefe marries sports performance with the science of the brain in an instructive and memorable manner. Coming from someone who knows so much about how the brain works and who also has practical experience with teaching others how to find the effortless present, this book is a must read.

Stalking the Effortless Present. This is the Holy Grail of sport psychology-teaching the mind to get out of the way so the body can do the things it's capable of doing.

Tell us if something is incorrect. Keefe calls it the effortless present, when the body is acting of its own accord while the brain has little to do but watch. All religions describe some kind of heightened awareness in their disciplines; Keefe explores whether such mystical experience is a fundamental aspect of our evolution, an integral part of what makes us human and keeps us from despair.

Published by Simon & Schuster, 2003. Condition: Good Hardcover. Bibliographic Details. Title: On the Sweet Spot: Stalking the Effortless. Publisher: Simon & Schuster. From Books Express (Portsmouth, NH, . Price: US$ 8. 8 Convert Currency. Publication Date: 2003.

Keefe calls it the effortless present, when the body is acting of its own accord while the brain has little to do but watch. And he brings the discussion back to the applications of such knowledge, reflecting on our ability to use these alternate planes to achieve better relationships, better lives, better moments

by Richard Keefe, Philip D. Harvey. ISBN 9780029172476 (978-0-02-917247-6) Hardcover, Free Press, 1994.

Thomas Cresswell is one of the main characters in the series. Thomas can be quite charming when he needs to be. Even charming Edmund Wadsworth, Audrey Rose's father, into letting her go to school in Romania. He is also a know- it- all and is very good at deducing people and crime scenes. Thomas is also very flirtatious when it comes to Audrey Rose. Thomas and his sister Daciana Cresswell are both very dramatic

Like most moments of spiritual revelation, this one took place on a landfill in New Jersey.A young man is standing at an unprepossessing driving range, hitting balls toward a distant fence, when something unusual takes place. As he begins his swing, he has the sensation that his club is drawing itself back on its own; when it is ready, it starts downward, makes perfect contact, and the ball soars off in the right-to-left arc he'd imagined, hitting the exact fencepost he'd been aiming at from 250 yards away. He steps back and wonders if he can do it again. He feels like an observer as the swing begins itself and resolves itself after perfect contact with the waiting ball, which again smacks against the distant post. He has, for however brief a time, entered “the zone.” Everyone who plays a sport knows that fleeting, ineffable sensation of everything falling into place: The pitched baseball looks as big as a grapefruit, the basket looks as wide as a trash can, the players around you are moving in slow motion. But as Richard Keefe, the director of the sport psychology program at Duke University, looked deeper into the nature of his experience, he found profound links to the spirit, the brain, perhaps even the soul. Keefe recognized that the feeling golfers and other athletes have of “being in the zone” is basically the same as a meditative state. And as a researcher with experience in brain chemistry, he went one step further: If we can figure out what's happening in the brain at such times, he reasons, we can learn how to get into that “zone” instead of just waiting for it to happen. This is the Holy Grail of sport psychology—teaching the mind to get out of the way so the body can do the things it's capable of doing. Keefe calls it the “effortless present,” when the body is acting of its own accord while the brain has little to do but watch. All religions describe some kind of heightened awareness in their disciplines; Keefe explores whether such mystical experience is a fundamental aspect of our evolution, an integral part of what makes us human and keeps us from despair. And he brings the discussion back to the applications of such knowledge, reflecting on our ability to use these alternate planes to achieve better relationships, better lives, better moments. Keefe's true subject is extraordinary experience—being in the zone, in the realm of effortless action. On the Sweet Spot builds from the physical and neurological to the mystical and philosophical, then adds a crucial layer of the practical (how we can capture or recapture these wondrous states). It is a work in the proud tradition of The Sweet Spot in Time, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, and How the Mind Works.
  • I love this book because it reminds me as to where I need to FOCUS MY ATTENTION!! We all have the wisdon and the power. Unfortunately for some of us we THINK that we know all we need to know. Do youself a favor. If you think that you already know all that you need to know, you need this information. If you want a great way to perceive your life, get this book. Good luck! Thank you!!!!!!!

  • Way too medical for me. There are no exercises, techniques, or strategies on how to achieve the "present". Very interesting though.

  • I ordered 2 books at the same time and this one took 8 days longer to get to me. Some of the pages were folded over from when it was put into the shipping envelope. The book itself wasn't quite what I was looking for but made for a fairly good read anyway.

  • I'd like to provide a different viewpoint. This book just didn't meet my expectations. I really wanted to like this book, but the writing seemed strained and forced. I don't find myself more knowledegable about the sweet spot after reading it. I was hoping it would be suitable for my 16yo nephew with a 2 handicap--he'd be totally bored with it. I found Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (written in 1991) a more satisfying scholarly treatise on a parallel topic.
    Keefe's interactions with his physician guru/mentor are all written in quotes as if they were recorded verbatim, though they couldn't be actual transcripts of real conversations unless Keefe carries a tape recorder. I found them almost embarassing to read in that no one really talks the way this physician is quoted in perfect stilted language. I believe they are what Keefe remembers from his discussions with his mentor rather than real quotes. Keefe also takes considerable literary license in going off topic when he discusses religion and a variety of other topics; I wanted a more pure sports book. The book was just not the scientific discussion I was, perhaps unrealistically, hoping for.

  • No sense being complicated about this. I enjoy the pleasure of having a very extensive golf library. This book is at the top of my list because it does away with a lot of the bs, and actually teaches you something about how to handle yourself and to grow as a golfer AND an adult. There's more medical info about how the brain works than a lot of people need to know or would even understand. That's not all bad, though; because you might learn something beyond the usual crap about your grip and how complicated it is to swing a stick. Personally, I'm playing better and enjoying my time on the range and course waaaay more. That is the point, isn't it?

  • Richard Keefe's book is a masterful examination of the elusive search for the combination of muscular and mental processes in playing the game of golf. Most importantly he brings it within the grasp of all of us who are willing to listen. Anyone who has played this game (or others) and been in that place where each shot seems to be physically effortless and without "thought" has wondered why maintaining it is so elusive and maddening. ..... Richard Keefe provides you with a thoughtful, inciteful outline and process for staying in touch with that place. Beyond that, it provides you with a route back when you lose it. This book is well written, with a wry sense of humor and Mr. Keefe's incites come from different (and sometimes surprising) places and disciplines. I urge you to read it, and then reread it.

  • Dr. Richard Keefe is obviously a brilliant man who has written about a complex scientific topic and delivered its contents in an easy to read, and easy to absorb manner. The interjections of his personal experiences lends the reader the confidence necessary to just relax and enjoy the book. He will gain insight and wisdom from his findings. This book is the union of science and desire, and its quest to discover the ultimate joy, the sweet spot. This book is THE perfect gift for any golfer. Keep a few on hand, you will be surprised at how many people you know that deserve this book!!

  • Having read several sports psychology books - Rotella etc. - I found "On The Sweet Spot" to be refreshing and provocative. Keefe marries sports performance with the science of the brain in an instructive and memorable manner. This is not a traditional "how to" book that reviews the standard steps such as "pre-shot routine" - I am sure that Keefe felt that those topics have been covered effectively by the existing body of work. Instead it probes deeper into the mysterious interaction between the self, the brain and spirituality.
    This is not a casual read, it demands thinking and reflection - but ultimately delivers a compelling message.