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ePub Ever Since I Had My Baby: Understanding, Treating, and Preventing the Most Common Physical Aftereffects of Pregnancy and Childbirth download

by Roger Goldberg

ePub Ever Since I Had My Baby: Understanding, Treating, and Preventing the Most Common Physical Aftereffects of Pregnancy and Childbirth download
Author:
Roger Goldberg
ISBN13:
978-0609808726
ISBN:
0609808729
Language:
Publisher:
Harmony; 1 edition (July 22, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Medicine
ePub file:
1852 kb
Fb2 file:
1594 kb
Other formats:
azw lit mobi lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
669

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Start by marking Ever Since I Had My Baby: Understanding, Treating, and Preventing the Most Common Physical Aftereffects of Pregnancy and Childbirth as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Now women have it all-a much-needed book covering an undiscussed part of women’s health, a book that beautifully explains the common and distressing problems of prolapse and incontinence. Finally, a woman can have the facts and options to make her a team player with her physician as she tackles these issues. Childbirth can wreak havoc on even the healthiest woman’s body, and you may still be feeling the effects long after the birth of your last child.

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Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. I have pelvic organ prolapse 12 weeks after the birth of my baby boy, and I was hoping for something more that what I've heard at the doc's or read about online.

book by Roger Goldberg

Now women have it all a much-needed book covering an undiscussed part of women s health, a book that beautifully explains the common and distressing problems of prolapse and incontinence.

Ever Since I Had My Baby - Understanding, Treating, and Preventing the Most Common Physical Aftereffects of Pregnancy and Childbirth The Latest Info on Handling and Overcoming Incontinence, Sexual Dysfunction and Pelvic Pressure and Pain

Ever Since I Had My Baby - Understanding, Treating, and Preventing the Most Common Physical Aftereffects of Pregnancy and Childbirth The Latest Info on Handling and Overcoming Incontinence, Sexual Dysfunction and Pelvic Pressure and Pain.

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бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Now women have it alla much-needed book covering an undiscussed part of womens health, a book that beautifully explains the common and distressing problems of prolapse and incontinence. Finally, a woman can have. The information in this book picks up where that in What to Expect When Youre Expecting leaves of. lizabeth G. Stewart, .

Belly Laughs: The Unclad Truth About Pregnancy and Childbirth by Jenny McCarthy 23. Ever Since I Had My Baby Understanding, Treating, and Preventing the Most Common Physical Aftereffects of Pregnancy and Childbirth by Goldberg Roger. GOOD NEWS!!! The Person you will be in 5 years from today is based on the books you read and the people you surround yourself with today.

Adapted From: Ever Since I Had My Baby: Understanding, Treating and Preventing the Most Common Physical Aftereffects of Pregnancy and Childbirth, by Roger P. Goldberg, MD MPH Since the birth of my baby, I can t control my bowel movements Normally bowel movements. Goldberg, MD MPH Since the birth of my baby, I can t control my bowel movements Normally bowel movements (stools) are stored in the rectum until the bowel sends a message to the brain that it is full, and. the person finds a convenient bathroom. This voluntary control is provided by a ring of muscular tissue called the anal sphincter which surrounds the anal opening and lower rectum.

“Now women have it all—a much-needed book covering an undiscussed part of women’s health, a book that beautifully explains the common and distressing problems of prolapse and incontinence. Finally, a woman can have the facts and options to make her a team player with her physician as she tackles these issues. The information in this book picks up where that in What to Expect® When You’re Expecting leaves off.”—Elizabeth G. Stewart, M.D., author of The V BookAt last, a reassuring, straightforward, and practical guide to easing, preventing, and even curing, once and for all, the symptoms of pelvic-floor disorders, including:•incontinence •prolapse •pressure and pain •sexual difficulties •bowel troubles Pelvic-floor disorders are much more common than you might think—millions of women suffer from one or more symptoms of pelvic-floor injury. These problems often stem from the strain placed on the body during pregnancy and childbirth, although symptoms may take years, or decades, to appear—if they don’t begin right away. Childbirth can wreak havoc on even the healthiest woman’s body, and you may still be feeling the effects long after the birth of your last child. If you suffer from any of these conditions, you do not need to feel helpless, and you are certainly not alone. Every one of these pelvic disorders is treatable, even curable in many cases. Dr. Roger Goldberg, a respected physician in the emerging field of urogynecology, provides the most up-to-date information on surgical and nonsurgical treatment options. He offers a clear explanation of the pelvic anatomy and why these disorders occur and also describes simple preventive techniques you can use to ease pelvic symptoms and minimize further strain (including the correct way to do Kegel exercises). Armed with the facts and candid advice contained in Ever Since I Had My Baby, you will be able to discuss your individual symptoms and potential treatments with your doctor confidently and knowledgeably. This book will help you realize the freedom you’ve been seeking from the emotional and physical burden of symptoms that often go unmentioned, or are overlooked, in women’s health care.
  • As a woman who suffered multiple prolapses after the birth of my first child, I only wish that this book was required reading before labor. Sadly, What To Expect When You're Expecting is lacking in information regarding pelvic prolapse and what it can do to a woman and her life after giving birth. Had I known the risks, I would have chosen a c-section over the natural childbirth I fought for. The movement in our society today to get back to midwives and doulas is lacking information about risks that are still inherent in births. For example, women with Ehler Danlos and other hypermobile or connective tissue disorders should be cautious when considering vaginal deliveries as prolapse is almost certain. In fact, most women will suffer prolapse at some point in their lives, it's just a question of when. For some, it's just an aggrevation--something to be repaired with a simple bladder tack. But for others, like me, my entire pelvic floor was torn apart. I've undergone three surgeries before the age of 33 and still I am not at a point where I am healed. A caesarean would have saved me all of this. I am not suggesting all women have c sections, but I do think they should be informed. This book gives this valuable information.

  • I wish I'd read this book before my first baby was born. While big drug companies have kept the world informed about men's health issues, nobody seems to mention the common problems caused to women during childbirth - and what to do about them. This book not only gives factual information about female anatomy and how it works, but a detailed discussion of what can go wrong, and how to prevent or fix problems. Much more detailed than a 10 minute appointment with an overbooked OBGYN, and lots of research to provoke important questions when you can see your doctor. Very reassuring for women with many levels of complications.

  • This was not what I was hoping for. I have pelvic organ prolapse 12 weeks after the birth of my baby boy, and I was hoping for something more that what I've heard at the doc's or read about online. I've found more useful the Whole Woman website/book and Katysays blog and videos. I do give it three stars because I've been astonished by how neglected this topic seems to be and was happy that someone wrote a book about it.

  • I am a physical therapist who treats patients who have problems with urinary and fecal incontinence and pelvic pain. This book was recommended to me, so I purchased it and have just finished reading it. I was pleased to find that it was not only information for women who have recently given birth, but offers just as much help for women who have gone through menopause. It is easy to understand, has some good illustrations and is a book that can make a tremendous difference in a woman's quality of life. I will keep it in my library as a good reference book on Womens Health, along with a few of my favorites. Get it and read it if you are a woman who is pregant, is having trouble with urinary incontinence, bowel problems, sexual dysfunction, troubles with menopause or if you just want to know more about how your body works.

    Beverly Helm PT

  • This book will make your anatomy and your treatment options clear to you, and provide a great foundation to talk with your doctor about anal or urinary incontinence, pelvic pain, or other problems. It gives you advice about how to even FIND a doctor. The author seems to love his work, which makes incontinence seem like just another treatable problem rather than a reason for embarassment and shame.

    The author is aware of the politics and passion regarding vaginal vs. caesarean births, and addresses the topic in an even-handed way. He outlines childbirth practices to avoid because they can be harmful to your pelvic floor (such as routine epsiotomies) and wisely includes a section on "preventive obstetrics," (a fascinating way to think of it). He also discusses the controversial issue of offering elective C sections in a fairly even-handed way. I am a big believer in vaginal childbirth and wanted to peg the author into one camp or another, but found it hard to decide which camp he would fall into. His ability to see and discuss both sides fairly is an asset in what can be a highly charged debate.

    My only criticism is that he often seems to cop out on various issues by saying "more research is needed." It's probably an accurate thing to say, but I and everyone else probably like definitive answers.