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ePub Proclus the Neoplatonic Philosopher download

by Thomas Taylor

ePub Proclus the Neoplatonic Philosopher download
Author:
Thomas Taylor
ISBN13:
978-1564591234
ISBN:
1564591239
Language:
Publisher:
Kessinger Publishing, LLC; Facsimile Ed edition (January 1, 1992)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1257 kb
Fb2 file:
1722 kb
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
479

Neoplatonism is a strand of Platonic philosophy that emerged in the third century AD against the background of Hellenistic philosophy and religion.

Neoplatonism is a strand of Platonic philosophy that emerged in the third century AD against the background of Hellenistic philosophy and religion.

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Proclus: Neoplatonic philosophy and science, by Lucas Siorvanes. The Philosophy of Proclus – the Final Phase of Ancient Thought, by L J Rosan. The Logical Principles of Proclus' Stoicheiôsis Theologikê as Systematic Ground of the Cosmos, by James Lowry. Ten Doubts Concerning Providence and On the Existence of Evils Thomas Taylor translation. Proclus's Life and Teachings. Index page of the Proclus section for the "Plato Transformed" project at the University Leuven, Belgium.

This book is a facsimile reprint and may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original.

Thomas Taylor (1758 - 1835) Thomas Taylor (15 May 1758 - 1 November 1835) was an English translator and Neoplatonist, the first to translate into English the complete works of Aristotle and of Plato, as well as the Orphic fragments

Thomas Taylor (1758 - 1835) Thomas Taylor (15 May 1758 - 1 November 1835) was an English translator and Neoplatonist, the first to translate into English the complete works of Aristotle and of Plato, as well as the Orphic fragments. His translations were influential to William Blake, Percy Bysshe Shelley and William Wordsworth.

Proclus (prō´kləs), 410?–485, Neoplatonic philosopher, b. Constantinople. He studied at Alexandria and at Athens, where he was a pupil of the Platonist Syrianus, whom he succeeded as a teacher. As a partisan of paganism he was forced to leave Athens, but he returned at the end of a year.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Proclus Diadochus, Translated by Thomas Taylor. Категория: Platonic, Neo-Platonic Philosophy. Neoplatonic Saints: The Lives of Plotinus and Proclus by their Students (Liverpool University Press - Translated Texts for Historians).

Explore publications in Neoplatonic Philosophy, and find Neoplatonic Philosophy experts. Studies on Neoplatonism proliferated in France between the end of Nineteenth Century and the first decades of the Twentieth. The Wisdom to Wonder: ‘Aja’ib and the Pillars of Islamic India.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
  • The actual title of this volume is, "Two Treatises of Proclus the Neoplatonic Philosopher" which are, "Ten Doubts Concerning Providence and a Solution of those Doubts" and "On the Subsistence of Evil", translated by Thomas Taylor, presumably in the 1920's, but no original copyright for this reprint is given. The book itself reminds me of a workbook for school, since it is 8"x10.5", and the pages seem to be enlargements of a smaller old edition.I bought this as a companion for Pseudo-Dionysius, but at least as far as this edition goes, I'm in over my head. Not only is the translation done in an antique style, but the relatively sparse notes presume a knowledge of Latin and Greek, and are not geared to the general reader. Editorially, the reader is not given much help, in that the text is not subdivided except by occasional numbers, and no headings or other structural clues are given.All that being said, this difficult book let's me peek into a remote mind, struggling with concerns that are likewise remote from me, and wonder. It will definitely not be most readers' cup of tea, and it could be done better, but I'll keep it all the same.

  • The previous reviewer is mistaken about the date of this work. Taylor was an interesting figure in the history of English scholarship, he translated a large number of ancient works, including the complete works of Plato and Aristotle. He also had a great interest in the neo-platonic writers, such as Plotinus, and Proclus. (In a sense he was to the Romantics what Marsilio Ficino was to the writers of the Italian renaissance.) The Greek texts he worked from were often highly unsatisfactory, so his translations won't serve for modern scholarly work, but they're an interesting milestone in the "platonic" tradition of English thought, and Taylor himself had a deep personal understanding of the writers he worked on. His insights, implicit in his translations and explicit in his essays, are often of great interest to anyone seeking to understand these difficult ancient texts. Taylor's dates are 1758-1835. I remember reading once that he was a friend of William Blake's.