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ePub Fear Itself: Horror on Screen and in Reality During the Depression and World War II download

by Melvin E. Matthews

ePub Fear Itself: Horror on Screen and in Reality During the Depression and World War II download
Author:
Melvin E. Matthews
ISBN13:
978-0786443130
ISBN:
0786443138
Language:
Publisher:
McFarland (May 13, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1323 kb
Fb2 file:
1615 kb
Other formats:
lit mbr rtf lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
800

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This book demonstrates how horror films of the 1930s and 1940s reflected specific events and personalities of the era, most notably the Great Depression and World War II. Beginning with Dracula and Frankenstein (1931), it relates the many ways that horror films and society. Beginning with Dracula and Frankenstein (1931), it relates the many ways that horror films and society intersected: Franklin D. Roosevelt's skepticism toward conventional wisdom and the public's distrust of experts was mirrored in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Murders in the Rue Morgue. Hyde and Murders in the Rue Morgue; the freaks in Tod Browning's 1932 film of the same name revolted against the.

LHMA 100 1 Matthews, Melvin E. 245 10 Fear itself : bhorror on screen and in reality during the Depression and World . 245 10 Fear itself : bhorror on screen and in reality during the Depression and World War II, cMelvin E. Matthews, Jr. 260 Jefferson, . bMcFarland & C. cc2009. 300 v, 210 p. : bill. c23 cm. 504 Includes bibliographical references and index.

Film critic Melvin Matthews has interpreted Freaks within the context of the Great Depression, writing that it "is essentially a story of. .Fear Itself: Horror on Screen and in Reality During the Depression and World War II. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland.

Film critic Melvin Matthews has interpreted Freaks within the context of the Great Depression, writing that it "is essentially a story of the little people (average Americans) versus the big people (the rich and businessmen). The film makes it clear that the big people, personified by Cleopatra and Hercules, scorn the Freaks. ISBN 978-0-786-44313-0.

Nothing to fear but fear itself". The World War II-era effort of black Americans to gain "a Victory over racism at home as well as Victory abroad. famous phrase from FDR's first inaugural address in 1933. Alliance of Great Britain, Soviet Union, United States, and France during World War II. December 7, 1941. Certificates sold by the United States government to pay for the war. Island Hopping Campaign. US strategy to reach mainland Japan by capturing key islands. Items the USA placed an embargo on in WWII.

His tip is rather funny and comes from the 1988 book Interviews with B Science Fiction and Horror Movie Makers: Writers, Producers, Directors, Actors, Moguls, and Makeup. This can either be a warning or a helpful lesson in pitching ridiculous ideas that you might not expect Hollywood to go for

Art theft and looting occurred on a massive scale during World War II. It originated with the policies of the Axis countries, primarily Nazi Germany and Japan, which systematically looted occupied territories.

Art theft and looting occurred on a massive scale during World War II. Near the end of the war the Soviet Union, in turn, began looting reclaimed and occupied territories. The grand scale of looted artwork by the Nazis has resulted in the loss of many pieces being scattered across the world.

It began after the stock market crash of October 1929, which sent Wall Street into a panic and wiped out millions of investors. The American economy entered a mild recession during the summer of 1929, as consumer spending slowed and unsold goods began to pile up, which in turn slowed factory production. Nonetheless, stock prices continued to rise, and by the fall of that year had reached stratospheric levels that could not be justified by expected future earnings. Stock Market Crash of 1929.

This book demonstrates how horror films of the 1930s and 1940s reflected specific events and personalities of the era, most notably the Great Depression and World War II. Beginning with Dracula and Frankenstein (1931), it relates the many ways that horror films and society intersected: Franklin D. Roosevelt's skepticism toward conventional wisdom and the public's distrust of experts was mirrored in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Murders in the Rue Morgue; the freaks in Tod Browning's 1932 film of the same name revolted against the powerful people of the circus, much like the Bonus Army protested the sufferings of the Depression; King Kong's rampage on New York personified the anti-New York sentiment in the nation at large; Lon Chaney Jr.'s Wolf Man symbolized the experience of his creator, Curt Siodmak, as a Jewish refugee from Nazi Germany.