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ePub Last Ride: The Defeat of Liuetenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer's 7th Cavalry at the Battle of Little Bighorn download

by James Clinton Hungerford

ePub Last Ride: The Defeat of Liuetenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer's 7th Cavalry at the Battle of Little Bighorn download
Author:
James Clinton Hungerford
ISBN13:
978-1413744989
ISBN:
1413744982
Language:
Publisher:
PublishAmerica; 1St Edition edition (August 1, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1136 kb
Fb2 file:
1611 kb
Other formats:
mbr txt lrf azw
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
307

This book sets the record straight concerning the life and times of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and his last ride.

It was a long way from the Ohio River Valley where he was born to that last day. This book sets the record straight concerning the life and times of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and his last ride.

The Battle of the Little Bighorn, known to the Lakota and other Plains Indians as the Battle of the Greasy Grass and also commonly referred to as Custer's Last Stand, was an armed engagement between combined forces of the Lakota, Northern Cheyen.

The Battle of the Little Bighorn, known to the Lakota and other Plains Indians as the Battle of the Greasy Grass and also commonly referred to as Custer's Last Stand, was an armed engagement between combined forces of the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes and the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army. The battle, which resulted in the defeat of . forces, was the most significant action of the Great Sioux War of 1876.

What was Colonel George Custer (of Custer's Last Stand) really like? .

What was Colonel George Custer (of Custer's Last Stand) really like? Andrew Givens, Grew up on a diet of war stories and just read lots about it. Answered Nov 24, 2017 · Author has 768 answers and . m answer views. Of this total force, the article goes on to list thirty-one officers by name and rank

George Armstrong Custer.

George Armstrong Custer. After the war, Custer was appointed a lieutenant colonel in the Regular Army and was sent west to fight in the Indian Wars. On June 25, 1876, while leading the 7th Cavalry Regiment at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana Territory against a coalition of Native American tribes, he was killed along with over one third of his command during an action later romanticized as "Custer's Last Stand". His dramatic end was as controversial as the rest of his career, and reaction to his life and career remains deeply divided.

Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer commanded the US 7th Cavalry Regiment. No general died at the Battle of the Little Bighorn on June 25, 1876, near the Little Bighorn River in Montana Territory. Who led the United States Cavalry at the battle of Little Bighorn? Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer of the 7th . However, Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer (1839-1876) and his 7th Cavalry Regiment were wiped out by the combined forces of Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes.

When Custer and his 7th Cavalry were defeated with no survivors, did anyone make any effort to obtain oral . The only person accepted as the survivor of the Custer column once fighting had begun was Curly, the young Crow Indian scout.

When Custer and his 7th Cavalry were defeated with no survivors, did anyone make any effort to obtain oral histories of Native American warrio. He had been one of the many scouts assigned to the Custer column. Perhaps because of his youth, or as a last attempt to get a message to Benteen, Curly was dispatched from the column.

Several members of George Armstrong Custer's family were also killed at. .

Several members of George Armstrong Custer's family were also killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, including two of his brothers, his brother-in-law and a nephew. In mid-June, three columns of . soldiers lined up against the camp and prepared to march. The Battle of Timbers, on August 20, 1794, was the last major conflict of the Northwest Territory Indian War between Native Americans and the United States.

Custer opted for an immediate attack by the 7th Cavalry into the Little Bighorn . Not one cavalry trooper lived to tell the story of Custer’s Last Stand.

Custer opted for an immediate attack by the 7th Cavalry into the Little Bighorn Valley.

Images of George Armstrong Custer's final battle at the Little Bighorn became iconic in the late 19th century . These images related to the Battle of the Little Bighorn give an indication of how the defeat of the 7th Cavalry was portrayed

Images of George Armstrong Custer's final battle at the Little Bighorn became iconic in the late 19th century and made Custer a mythic figure. These images related to the Battle of the Little Bighorn give an indication of how the defeat of the 7th Cavalry was portrayed. A Massacre in 1867 Introduced Custer to the Brutality of Warfare on the Plains. Custer with Kidder's Body. New York Public Library. George Armstrong Custer had been through years of combat in the Civil War, and became known for leading daring, if not reckless, cavalry charges.

The Battle of Little Bighorn, more commonly known as Custer’s Last stand, was fought June 25-26 . The 7th Cavalry suffered an overwhelming defeat with five of the Cavalry’s twelve companies being completely decimated.

The Battle of Little Bighorn, more commonly known as Custer’s Last stand, was fought June 25-26, 1876 between the . 7th Cavalry and the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and the Arapaho tribes.

It was a long way from the Ohio River Valley where he was born to that last day of his life leading his battalion of five troops of the 7th Cavalry across a sleepy little river in the Valley of the Greasy Grass against the largest massed Indian encampment ever recorded in North America. His had been a lifetime filled with close family associations, moronic episodes of youth, eye-popping bravery, unequaled valor, and sometimes questionable honor. Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer had spent half his life fighting his country’s enemies, be they Confederate gray or frontier Indians. He has been heralded as a national hero and damned as the worst soldier ever to command. His reputation has withstood countless attacks concerning his personal character and abilities as a man, a soldier, and a commander. This book sets the record straight concerning the life and times of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and his last ride.
  • Whoever proofread this book should be court-martialed for dereliction of duty. Grammatical errors abound:incorrect verb tenses,punctuation,misplaced modifiers,unclear antecedents,typos,
    spelling,missing/additional words,incomplete sentences,etc. Repetition of facts,changing focus mid=paragraph,contradictions. Examples: "drug" instead of "dragged","brung" instead of "brought","president"instead of"precedent","wonder" instead of "wander","hostilities" instead of "hostiles"...and all of this-and more- in the 1st 100 pages! But wait;there is more. JEB Stewart instead of "Stuart"(oh,come
    on),"Rossier" instead of "Rossiter".Rossiter and Wheeler were not younger than George, and Custer was never a major as indicated on pg.63. Forget"Garry Owen","Taps" should be played over this book,and it should be buried as far from the LBH as possible. Oh yes,almost forgot--it is African "descent" not "decent"....Just finished the book. I'm asking for my $24.95 back.This book is an insult to the soldiers who perished, and an embarassment to the company that published it.PLEASE-do notwaste your $. This is my final entry as my position is being overrun by hostile, renegade literary forces.I'm saving the last bullet for myself.Farewell. Come to think of it-keep the $; use it to further either the author's or editor's language/research skills.

  • There are more typos per page than any book I have ever read. What happened to proof-reading? What happened to paragragh structure....topic sentence, supporting sentences? If the author has ideas to present, they are mostly lost, awash in grammatical errors. The Publisher "Publish America" has done a disservice to author and reader alike. The book is such a disjointed mess, it's hard to tell if this author has any ability at all. I can recall reading books of all sorts that I didn't like, for whatever the reason. But I can't ever recall reading a book which left me thinking;I'VE BEEN RIPPED OFF. I WANT MY MONEY BACK. This is what I get for not doing my research...BUT I STILL WANT MY MONEY BACK.

  • AWFUL READING!

    EDITOR MUST APOLOGIZE AND RETIRE THE COPIES ON THE MARKET!

    NOT FIT FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION.

    EXCEPTING THE FIRST REVIEW (MARKETING AT IT'S SIMPLEST FORM!) THE OTHER REVIEWERS HAVE SAID IT ALL.

    PASS FROM IT!

  • This book is not only a great read, but it is historical, factual, and spellbinding. I have read many accounts of this event, and none have captured my attention and won my praise to such a degree. I highly recommend this book!