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ePub The Mayor of Casterbridge (Penguin Classics) download

by Martin Seymour-Smith,Thomas Hardy

ePub The Mayor of Casterbridge (Penguin Classics) download
Author:
Martin Seymour-Smith,Thomas Hardy
ISBN13:
978-0140431254
ISBN:
014043125X
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Classics; Reprint edition (July 27, 1978)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1845 kb
Fb2 file:
1777 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf mbr docx
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
697

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Thomas Hardy, Martin Seymour-Smith. The mayor of Casterbridge Penguin classics Penguin English library English Library Penguin classics: Literature. From the stunning opening wife-selling scene (at one time a not uncommon phenomenon in England) to the final playing out his tragedy, Michael Henchard proves to be violent, selfish, greedy and crude. Hardy's volumes of poetry include Poems of the Past and Present, The Dynasts: Part One, Two, and Three, Time's Laughingstocks, and The Famous Tragedy of the Queen of Cornwall. From 1833 until his death, Hardy lived in Dorchester, England.

The Mayor of Casterbridge, one of Thomas Hardy’s most powerful novels .

The Mayor of Casterbridge, one of Thomas Hardy’s most powerful novels, opens with a scene of shocking heartlessness. Thomas Hardy’s almost supernatural insight into the course of wayward lives, his instinctive feeling for the beauty of the rural landscape, and his power to invest that landscape with moral significance all came together in an utterly fluent way in The Mayor of Casterbridge.

The Mayor of Casterbridge: The Life and Death of a Man of Character is an 1886 novel by the English author Thomas Hardy. One of Hardy's Wessex novels, it is set in a fictional rural England with Casterbridge standing in for Dorchester in Dorset where the author spent his youth. It was first published as a weekly serialisation from January 1886.

Booktopia has Leviathan, Penguin Classics by Thomas Hobbes. Titled after the biblical Leviathan, this book concerns the structure of society and legitimate government, and is regarded as one of the earliest and most influential examples of social contract theory. Thomas Hobbes argues for a social contract and rule. Leviathan" by Thomas Hobbes.

The Mayor of Casterbridge. 1. One evening of late summer, before the nineteenth century had reached one-third of its span, a young man and woman, the latter carrying a child, were approaching the large village of Weydon-Priors, in Upper Wessex, on foot

The Mayor of Casterbridge. Series: Penguin Clothbound Classics. In a fit of drunken anger, Michael Henchard sells his wife and baby daughter for five guineas at a country fair.

Penguin Classics, Paperback, 445 pages. The Mayor of Casterbridge (Paperback). Published April 1st 1998 by Penguin Books. ISBN: 014043125X (ISBN13: 9780140431254). Paperback, 448 pages.

Thomas Hardy The Mayor of Casterbridge. One evening of late summer, before the nineteenth century had reached one-third of its span, a young man and woman, the latter carrying a child, were approaching the large village of Weydon-Priors, in Upper Wessex, on foot. One evening of late summer, before the nineteenth century had reached one-third of its span, a young man and woman, the latter carrying a child, were approaching the large village of Weydon-Priors, in Upper Wessex, on foot

read by the actor Nigel Anthony. About the book: 'Here - I am waiting to know about this offer of mine.

read by the actor Nigel Anthony. The woman is no good to me. Who'll have her?' In a fit of drunken anger, Michael Henchard sells his wife and baby daughter for five guineas at a country fair.

Literary Studies, Classic American Literature
  • I bought this book because I was enjoying reading a library copy and the library insisted they wanted it back. Therefore, the poor rating has nothing to do with Thomas Hardy nor his book. It is a well written book and worth reading. My poor rating has to do with this particular copy of the book. It is unreadable. It would appear that someone took an electronic copy (There is a reference in the front of the book, under the 'copy right' (sic) about deleting which you cannot do with a hard copy.) of the book and copy/pasted it into a new format and then printed it. Coincidentally, according to the date in the back of the book, that happened on the day I bought it. The book does not contain a forward, any information about the book nor about the author. Neither does it contain any paragraph indentations. The entire 213 pages is one long, long paragraph! This makes it basically unreadable and is especially annoying during conversations when the first speaker's lines run into the second speaker's with only quotation marks between. It also makes for some really interesting hyphens in the middle of words where the word was once split between two lines but no longer is. I tried reading it, but it drove me nuts. I recommend you buy a different copy of the book.

  • This book is a classic and should be read by anyone who has a love for words.....you will be pressing so many words to get definitions on your kindle that it could almost be distracting....but......but the vocabulary is so delicious that you must know the meaning of the words.....and so your kindle helps you......what a plus this is!!!

    The actual story revolves around relationships in England during a time of very specified courting behavior that we would find amusing today...but stick with it. It is not an easy beginning read, nor is it possible to get the flow of the book after a few chapters. Remember this was a time when vocabulary embellished every sentence, description, thought, movement. A mere kiss meant a bold statement of presumed matrimony....so different from today...right?

    The characters are all farmers and you learn what a difficult and rewarding life this could be for some one under their circumstances. There are the usual twists and turns in the book that keep you busy and reluctant to stop reading...so enjoy....enjoy...and be amazed how we lost so many interesting words and descriptions to mediocre literature.

  • It's a soap opera and was written as a serial for a newspaper. It was not written all at once before publication and it shows. A young man gets drunk and sells his wife and baby to a sailor. He goes to Casterbridge and becomes a businessman and then the mayor for a year. In the meantime he meets another woman and has an affair with her but does not marry her because he does not know what happened to his wife. Then about 18 years later, the wife and child show up, the sailor having died a sea. He decides that he should re-marry his wife so no one would know of the scandal. He meets a young man from Scotland who is perfect in every way and hires him as his business manager at his corn business. Then his wife dies. The daughter does not know what happened when she was a baby and think of Henchard (that's his name) as her stepfather. However when his wife died, he told her the truth, only to discover that his own child had died and the daughter he thought was his was actually the daughter of the dead sailor. Then he got mad at Donald, the young Scot, and fired him. Then his old girlfriend showed up and wanted to marry him. She had inherited money, lots of it, from an aunt and was now rich. He put her off a day too long and she saw Donald and it was love at first sight. So Donald and Lucetta, Henchard's old girlfriend got married, even though the daughter, Elizabeth, had hoped to marry him. Then all the scandal came to light about the sale of the wife and about the affair and Lucetta was so upset that she died. Meanwhile the sailor wasn't dead at all and he came back and looked for his daughter Elizabeth. And on, and on, and on, and on. I'm sure Hardy would be surprised to find out that people are still reading his soap opera. It would make a good serialized tv soap opera, and I would like to see the movie, but I wouldn't call it classic literature -- more like pulp fiction. A lot of it is boring.

  • Bathsheba Everdene is a self-willed and independent young woman who inherits her uncle's farm. An assertive and confident nature in a woman is a novelty in the rural parish of Weatherbury and Bathsheba soon attracts three very different admirers.

    The only other book I've read by Thomas Hardy is Tess of the D'Urbervilles which I enjoyed because Tess was a well-rounded female character which I feel is a rare find in most books. Bathsheba too, is a well developed character and the reader gets to know her intimately as she comes of age in this sometimes funny and other times tragic love story.

    Hardy is prone to waffling especially when describing architecture or milieus so the reader must be patient. The first half of the book is quite slow and I was tempted to give up on the book but the second half more than makes up for it.

    The second half is tense and builds up to an unexpected violent scene and while the ending is predictable it is also satisfying. I recommend this book to those who enjoyed Tess of the D'Urbervilles.