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ePub Those Devils in Baggy Pants download

by Ross S. Carter

ePub Those Devils in Baggy Pants download
Author:
Ross S. Carter
ISBN13:
978-1886681200
ISBN:
1886681201
Language:
Publisher:
Claymore Pub Corp; 3 edition (May 1, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1918 kb
Fb2 file:
1743 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf docx rtf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
100

Ross Carter has a unique style of writing

Ross Carter has a unique style of writing. He is not Shakespeare, it is like you are sitting with a relative and he or she is relating an experience. It reminds me of my Dad telling me about being in the 6th Armored Division.

Start by marking Those Devils in Baggy Pants as Want to Read . Ross S. Carter served with Company C, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division in World War II.

Start by marking Those Devils in Baggy Pants as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The book is a series of vignettes that focus on the humor that can be found in the midst of a firefight (an American Captain arguing with a German machine-gunner in between the German hosing the paratroopers with bullets) or in the miserable living conditions of a "rest camp". There is also pathos when Ross writes of the loss of his fellow soldiers and the random death that is a constant companion on the battlefield.

Paperback Author: ross s. carter Publisher: Signet, New American Library Release Date: 1951. My Dad was in the 82nd Airborne Division, 504th Paratrooper. He was one of this Devils in Baggy Pants. This book S written by a fellow soldier from his personal perspective. It's not a historical written book. Very good and exciting book. THE GLORY AND SHAME OF WAR, VIVIDLY PORTRAYED IN A BOOK THAT IS ‘ONE OF THE VERY BEST’ -F. Ross Carter was one of three men who survived the suicide stands of his platoon of paratroopers. They had a three-way destiny-to be wounded, killed, or captured.

Tales, tail and terrific, by a member of the 504th Parachute Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division, carry on the ""what price glory"" tradition in their outspoken picture of things known and experienced from training to combat

Tales, tail and terrific, by a member of the 504th Parachute Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division, carry on the ""what price glory"" tradition in their outspoken picture of things known and experienced from training to combat.

The Black Devil Brigade. I'll go now to say good-by to Ross. Boyd G. Carter Lincoln, Nebraska August 1950. He again stood at attention for some time before his grave. When he rejoined me, he said: "I have known a lot of brave men, but here on this hill lies the bravest. Those Devils in Baggy Pants updated their cover photo. December 4, 2014 ·. See All.

00 0. Categories: History Of The Americas. Those Devils in Baggy Pants. By (author) Ross S. Carter. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Ross Carter was one of three men who survived the suicide stands of his platoon of paratroopers. Books related to Those Devils In Baggy Pants. But bound together by deep comradeship and extraordinary daring, the twelve men in his unit set incredible records of heroism.

World War II classic tale of the 82nd Airborne Division's fight across North Africa that culminated in the Battle of the Bulge. The author was one of three men who survived the suicide stands of his platoon of paratroopers. First published in 1951. Shipping: FREE Within . Destination, rates & speeds.

Heaps's book untitled The Grey Goose of Arnhem (The Evaders) stated that an informer told the Gestapo that Jewish people were hiding in Ebbens's house. Carter, Ross S. (1996). De Groot, Norbert A. (1977).

A limited edition reprint of the World War II classic tale of the 82nd Airborne Divisions fight across North Africa and culminated in the Battle of the Bulge. The author was one of three men who survived the suicide stands of his platoon of paratroopers. First published in 1951, over one millon sold. A Reader's Digest condensed book selection.
  • As might be expected for a book written in so short a time, it is uneven. But the better parts are among the best ever written about World War II. I repeat, the best, the best, the best.

  • First hand accounts that make you painfully aware of the consequences of sending 'our men' to war. Written with wit that helps to soften the harshness of the loss of life. You'll understand why they were called the greatest generation!

  • great book have read it several times

  • I had read this many years ago when i was in high school, it was worth reading again, i had forgotten how good it was.

  • my wife's relative was the "jewish" guy in the book

  • The book I ordered showed on time and as described, I would not hesitate to use this dealer again

  • I know this book is extremely popular with many but for the life of me I couldn't understand why.

    Carter served with C Co, 1st battalion, 504th PIR from Africa and into Germany. He wrote his account straight after the war, though his brother completed the editing due to Carters death from cancer in April 1947. This is not a memoir in the same sense as most others, it is more of a novel, though Carter writes in the first person. It is also primarily the story of his platoon too, rather than his own story.

    Carter jumps into Sicily, his unit being the one which was heavily fired upon by allied ships. There is a little combat but most is in Italy, starting with Salerno and ending with Anzio. Two thirds of the book are about his time here. Following Italy he participates in Market Garden and the Bulge where he is wounded. His account stops here but his brother adds that he returned to his unit before the end, returning to the US in June 1945 (he'd have had a lot of points!).

    As I've said above, this is not the standard memoir. There is virtually nothing about Carters background, training or his personal thoughts. It is essentially a platoon's story as seen through the eyes of the men. Carter refers to most by nickname and I felt that this had the effect of limiting my connection with them. Some of this was to disguise identities, some characters being amalgams. Much of what is written is about non-combat antics. There's lots of fist fighting each other, stealing booze or being bizarre in some way. It seemed caricatured to me. I found it hard to recognise these soldiers. They seemed so different to those in the other memoirs I've read. There is a lot of slang which is Ok but many printing errors, random numbers etc, which is not.

    Choosing to write in this style is problematic for me. The combat is distant and impersonal. Carter barely writes about his own actions. For much of the book I thought he was a medic. Almost everything is told through the actions of the others. He won the Silver and Bronze Stars but never mentions what he did to earn these. Others have done the same of course but here we know so little of Carter to start with. Indeed, the most revealing material is provided by his brother in the epilogue. I suspect, like others, he has primarily written to commemorate his comrades. There is the flavour of combat, attitudes to `Krautheads' and sadness at comrades lost but it is somewhat removed and didn't have the same clarity and impact as most memoirs have. This said, there is a real emotional punch in the last few chapters.

    Carter was a well educated man and a fair writer and he clearly deliberately chose to portray his story in this particular way.. It's an angle that doesn't really appeal to me but given the author's experiences and his prompt recording of them, it must reflect the nature of small group combat in an accurate way. (Someone suggested that he himself is actually the `Arab'). I think his intention was to convey the rough atmosphere of a combat platoon as he had seen it. If so, he does this well enough but I'm not sure it will work for all modern readers. Though there are many battles described, the exchanges between the men seemed to dominate the text. Some of the combat stories recounted seemed a bit like urban legends but perhaps this only appeared so because Carter wrote so very little about his own actions that he seemed more observer than participant. My recommendation - Of some interest.

  • "Ross: When I was young and innocent, I read your book for the first time. It inspired me to become Airborne. Later, when I was older and came home from Iraq, I read your book again, and this time I understood it. In your book you said everything that I ever wanted to say about war. The brotherhood of soldiers, and the bitter emptiness that you find when you return home.
    Times change and faces change, but there will always be an 82nd Airborne [Division]. Sleep well, my brother."
    -/Servo/ 25 May 1995
    Letter found on the tombstone of Ross S. Carter, author of this book.

    Ross S. Carter was a paratrooper in the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division during World War 2. He served in North Africa, Salerno, Sicily, Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. During the book, Carter explains the hell on earth he endured with his brothers-in-arms in segments as he remembered them. Making the book roughly 250 pages. Sadly, the reason why the book is so short is the fact that Ross Carter died of cancer in 1947.
    From his hospital bed, in 1947, Carter asked one of his brothers to read his draft -- so he could discuss his experiences with Ross -- and to edit segments of the final draft for him. The book was published after the death of Ross Carter.

    For me, I've read over 15 books on Airborne forces of World War 2 and I can honestly say that this is my favorite. The way Carter explains war, battle and brotherhood is truly amazing.

    However, if I was asked if the book had any flaws, I would have to point out the fact that oddly the book has several typos, misplaced numbers and/or misspellings of words. This is mainly experienced very early in the book, and gradually fade away as the book goes on. While at times this can be confusing, it doesn't create a major concern and doesn't happen often enough to make you think twice about it.

    With that being said, "Those Devil's In Baggy Pants" should be read by anyone interested on said subject.

    Ross S. Carter,
    Jan. 9th, 1919 - Apr. 18th, 1947