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ePub Better Living Through Reality TV: Television and Post-Welfare Citizenship download

by James Hay,Laurie Ouellette

ePub Better Living Through Reality TV:  Television and Post-Welfare Citizenship download
Author:
James Hay,Laurie Ouellette
ISBN13:
978-1405134415
ISBN:
1405134410
Language:
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (January 29, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1155 kb
Fb2 file:
1320 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
918

Better Living through Reality TV achieves what cultural theory does at its best: a fascinating, insightful, and clear-eyed look at contemporary society as seen through the lens of pop culture. With this book, reality TV scholarship finally 'gets real'. This book raises a whole new set of questions about reality TV. Less concerned with the "reality" of the shows, these authors force us to confront the realities of our contemporary culture. This book is perhaps less for fans and more for those who want to think deeply about contemporary television and its relationship to the pressing political and social issues of our time.

Reality television does not do things to us – but it can represent to us some of the things we are doing to ourselves

Reality television does not do things to us – but it can represent to us some of the things we are doing to ourselves. In this regard, reality television remains a fruitful site for ongoing cultural study because it has something potentially interesting and instructive and therefore real to say about the society that continues to produce it. This chapter explores some of the dimensions of the. portrayal of monitoring and surveillance on reality television, and how this might inform an understanding of broader surveillance practices in the digital era.

Laurie Ouellette, James Ha.

How television judges neighborhoods, ideas of citizenship, what is a good household and a bad household and how this is packaged for consumption of the television audience. Chapter six examines the "democracy" of many forms of reality television - how people are tasked to vote for shows, for people.

Argues that reality television teaches viewers to monitor, motivate, improve, transform and protect themselves in. .Laurie Ouellette is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Minnesota.

Argues that reality television teaches viewers to monitor, motivate, improve, transform and protect themselves in the name of freedom, enterprise, and personal responsibility. James Hay is an Associate Professor in the College of Communication at the University of rbana.

by Ouellette, Laurie. ISBN: 1405134402 Subject(s): Reality television programs %Social aspects. Authors: Hay, James,%1952-%joint author Published by : Blackwell Pu. (Malden, MA :) Physical details: 255 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Reality television programs. Online Resources: Table of contents only. Contributor biographical information. Publisher description.

Better Living through Reality TV: Television and Post-Welfare Citizenship. Viewers like you?: how public TV failed the people. Laurie Ouellette, James Hay. 8 Mb.

A lucid and fascinating treatment of the modern obsession with work and self-improvement, this lively book will strike a.

Все результаты Поиска книг Google Об авторе (2005). Laurie Ouellette is associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Malden: Black-well, 2008.

Laurie Ouellette, James Hay. Combining cutting-edge theories of culture and government with programming examples-including Todd TV, Survivor, and American Idol-Better Living through Reality TV moves beyond the established concerns of political econom. Combining cutting-edge theories of culture and government with programming examples-including Todd TV, Survivor, and American Idol-Better Living through Reality TV moves beyond the established concerns of political economy and cultural studies to conceptualize television's evolving role in the contemporary period.

Combining cutting-edge theories of culture and government withprogramming examples—including Todd TV,Survivor, and American IdolBetter Livingthrough Reality TV moves beyond the established concerns ofpolitical economy and cultural studies to conceptualizetelevision's evolving role in the contemporary period.A major textbook on the impact of reality and lifestyletelevision on today’s programming, and on broader social,cultural and political trendsDraws on a range of examples from The Apprentice andAmerican Idol to Extreme Makeover and WifeSwapArgues that reality television teaches viewers to monitor,motivate, improve, transform and protect themselves in the name offreedom, enterprise, and personal responsibility
  • Good deal.

  • There was more writing an highlighting in the book than I had anticipated, but I can read the book, so it is okay.

  • Better Living Through Reality TV is thoughtful and insightful investigation of the politics of reality television. These authors remind us of the history of reality-based programming in the United States and make a convincing argument as to why reality TV proliferates and thrives today. They link the recent explosion of reality programs--from charity shows like Extreme Makeover: Home Edition to competitions like Survivor--to transformations within our political and social culture. These recent changes have to do with the adoption of neo-liberal policies by the US government that seek to privatize social services and demand that citizens take more responsibility for their lives. They argue that reality TV offers citizens a vast array of templates for navigating these changes, and thus becomes a partner in government. My favorite chapter is entitled "Makeover TV: Labors of Reinvention." Here the authors discuss the demands of contemporary work life in relation to makeover shows. They show how makeover programs connect to a need for workers to become CEOs of themselves in order to stay afloat (or at least try) in the new "flexible" economy.

    This book raises a whole new set of questions about reality TV. Less concerned with the "reality" of the shows, these authors force us to confront the realities of our contemporary culture. This book is perhaps less for fans and more for those who want to think deeply about contemporary television and its relationship to the pressing political and social issues of our time. Despite the academic nature of this book, I think committed readers interested in popular culture will find it incredibly useful and provocative. Students of television have no excuse: you must read this book.

  • Better Living Through Reality TV is an impressive study which makes a strong argument for taking seemingly trivial programming seriously, not least because of how such fare can articulate contemporary and deepening socio-political trends.

    As others have indicated, there is much substance in the authors' arguments regarding a neo-liberal, post-welfare, and entrepreneurial political climate as played out on and as enabled by TV. What is particularly striking for those interested in Media Studies is how Ouellette and Hay go beyond assessing how TV reflects socio-political issues to examining how television programming actually participates in the government of everyday life. For example, they illustrate how Reality programming goes beyond entertainment to act as a resource for inventing, managing and protecting viewers as citizens. Those who cling to the notion that there is a separate category of "politics" (maybe this is what is on Fox news?) which is distinct from all the other stuff (like Reality TV) will probably just not get it: they won't understand the purpose or argument of such a book. But for those who are interested in how television can give us a way to think about serious contemporary issues, then this book does a really excellent job. The writing is lucid and any historical or theoretical insights are patiently explained, so that the book should be of interest to both academic and general readers.