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by Theodore K. Rabb

ePub The Last Days of the Renaissance:  the March to Modernity download
Author:
Theodore K. Rabb
ISBN13:
978-0465068012
ISBN:
0465068014
Language:
Publisher:
Basic Books; 1 edition (April 3, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1612 kb
Fb2 file:
1580 kb
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
921

Modern historians are often loathe to utilize periodization in describing the transformation of civilizations

Modern historians are often loathe to utilize periodization in describing the transformation of civilizations. Rabb, a Princeton professor of Renaissance and early modern history, does not shy away from the term as he describes the emergence of "modern" Western civilization in the seventeenth century. While acknowledging that any historical transformation has evolutionary aspects, Rabb convincingly asserts that the civilizations of seventeenth-century Europe were based on a radical break with the period usually referred to as the Renaissance.

Xxiii, 246 p. : 22 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-230) and index

Xxiii, 246 p. 229-230) and index. The unities of the Medieval West - Europe reshaped : toward the Renaissance - the civilization of the Renaissance - Civilization in crisis - The last days of the Renaissance - Art, prophecy, and the end of the Renaissance - Revolution and modernity.

Here, for the first time, renowned classicist Theodore Rabb defines the changes that marked the shift away from the Renaissance to Modernity, and explains why these changes took place. The European Renaissance is usually characterized by the belief that a distinct antique civilization represented the ideal for all human endeavors. But there were other unities that defined the era: a shift in the role of the aristocracy from a warrior class to a cultural elite, a growth in education, a more thoughtful probing into the sciences, and the use of the arts for nonreligious purposes

A leading Renaissance scholar examines what brought one of history's most fascinating eras to its end and gave rise to the modern era There is little debate that the Renaissance began at the end of the fourteenth century. Its end, though, is much more difficult to pin down

A leading Renaissance scholar examines what brought one of history's most fascinating eras to its end and gave rise to the modern era There is little debate that the Renaissance began at the end of the fourteenth century. Its end, though, is much more difficult to pin down. Here, for the first time, renowned classicist Theodore Rabb defines the changes that marked the shift away from the Renaissance to Modernity, and explains why these changes took place.

Theodore K. Rabb (March 5, 1937 – January 7, 2019) was an American historian specializing in the early modern period of. .The Last Days of the Renaissance & the March to Modernity (New York: Basic Books, 2006). With Robert I. Rotberg. Rabb (March 5, 1937 – January 7, 2019) was an American historian specializing in the early modern period of European history. He was a Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at Princeton University Contents.

the civilization of the Renaissance. Civilization in crisis. Art, prophecy, and the end of the Renaissance. Revolution and modernity.

The last days of the Renaissance and the path to modernity. the civilization of the Renaissance. The last days of the Renaissance. Includes bibliographical references and index.

There is little debate that the Renaissance began at the end of the fourteenth century. This amazing little book charts the course from the Renaissance to Modernity

There is little debate that the Renaissance began at the end of the fourteenth century. This amazing little book charts the course from the Renaissance to Modernity. The trigger for change was gunpowder, which made Feudal castles vulnerable, leading to the formation of modern countries. Later the printing press led to the formation of democracies.

Published by Basic Books, 2006. Condition: Good Hardcover. Standard shipping can on occasion take up to 30 days for delivery. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller. Bookseller: Bookseller: Books Express Address: Portsmouth, NH, . AbeBooks Bookseller Since: August 14, 2015.

There is little debate that the Renaissance began at the end of the fourteenth century. Its end, though, is much more difficult to pin down. Here, for the first time, renowned classicist Theodore Rabb defines the changes that marked the shift away from the Renaissance to Modernity, and explains why these changes took place. The European Renaissance is usually characterized by the belief that a distinct antique civilization represented the ideal for all human endeavors. But there were other unities that defined the era: a shift in the role of the aristocracy from a warrior class to a cultural elite, a growth in education, a more thoughtful probing into the sciences, and the use of the arts for nonreligious purposes.By the dawn of the seventeenth century, four developments had swept over the world, altering these unities and ending the Renaissance: a break with the period's obsession with the past, which invited openness to innovation; a quest for central political control to cure increasing instability; a change in direction of people's passion and enthusiasm; and a new commitment to reason. With thoughtful, wide-lens scholarship and close, detailed looks throughout at the significant moments of change, Rabb offers us a radically new understanding of one of the most pivotal shifts in modern history.
  • Book came in better than expected condition (Like New) and faster than expected. High School boy so thrilled (not) to get started early on summer history assignment!

  • Professor Rabb provides a clearly written, if mostly standard survey course on the themes of the Renaissance for most of his book, and then at the end expands his thoughts on the distinctions from the Renaissance and transition to "modernity," commencing about 1700. Imagine you are taking a college-level course entitled something like "Introduction to the Renaissance and Early Modernity." You might well hope to get an instructor as authoritative, clear-minded and amiable as Rabb. You also probably should hope for an "optional reading list" from Professor Rabb that might allow you not only to consider alternative view or themes which give more weight to science and economics, which Rabb considers significant, but over-rated compared with certain aesthetic and moral culturalal developments, e.g., anti-war sentiments post the 30-years war. He does think gunpowder was especially important, however, in shaping political, economic and social changes at both the beginning and end of the Renaissance. In fairness, I should add that Rabb, in fact, does provide a few standard recommendations in a 1 1/2 page "Suggestions for further Reading," e.g., Bruckhardt's "Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy" and Huizingas's "Wanning of the Middle Ages," plus a handful of other basic texts. Unfortunately, no notes sourcing his own, specific conclusions are supplied.

    In short, if you are looking for a fairly succinct survey of period, neatly written, then this may be the book for you. If you know something of the period or have a deeper interest, you still may find Rabb's thoughts and differing thematic emphasis interesting, although not especially surprising, and you may want to look for a more extensive and more thoroughly sourced volume.

  • This is an interesting book. It was very difficult for me to come up with a rating for it. The utter lack of end notes, foot notes, or a bibliography made me want to, as a historian, give this a 1 star. However, the book is aimed at non-historians, and even historians that are not familiar with the Renaissance will find this volume useful. It is very accessible, and while I agree with Julieta that it doesn't contribute too much new to the field, it is a good history book for those seeking some basic background information. That is the goal of this book afterall, and everyone must start somewhere.

    I was also willing to overlook the lack of notes and bibliography only because Thedore K. Rabb is a reknowned historian of the Renaissance at Princeton University, so it is clear that none of the information in the book is unscholarly or unreliable, even if a professional historian would not gain much. Overall, if you are an experienced historian and want a truly scholarly monograph on the Renaissance, your going to have to look elsewhere, but if you are looking to get your feet wet in history (I would recommend this book to middle school or high school history students especially) then this accomplishes that goal.

    Overall, I couldn't give this a five because the lack of notes is glaring, but it was enjoyable if not earthshattering in its scholarship and it accomplishes its clearly stated purpose of appealing to those new to history quite well so I had to give it a three, because I cannot emphasis enough the lack of notes, but for casual readers not concernced with those it will probably be a four or five.

  • Professor Rabb's volume is written in an erudite manner. It blends popular history with significantly astute scholarship. All historians are not eloquent in their handling of the facts of history but Rabb's introduction is a well designed example of smoothness. But a few chapters are not so designed. By traversing the Middle Ages first, he prepares the reader for the era which succeeds it: The Renaissance period. Obiviously quite comfortable with the primary documents and sources of the periods of which he writes, the reader learns of political relationships; social scenes at the time of a civilizations ascent and descent; scholars and their training for various professions and of certain stimuli that insitigated multiple wars. His treatment of the decline of the Renaissance Era is preceded by 90 pages of precise, historical information. The remainder of the volume then poses specific reasons for the dissolution of The Renaissance: one of which was the "fading into obsolescence..." of a set of values "during the final decades of the seventeenth century.(p.159)"

    His descriptions of how the values and methods of inquiry used in the middle Ages later were retrieved by some of those during The Age of Revolution or The Enlightenment Era were convincing (p.158). The chapter on 'Art, Prophecy, and The End of the Renaissance' should be required reading for anyone interested in the way biblical prophecies may be misunderstood and mishandled; a result which clearly leads to a misguidance of people--as demonstrated through his advertisement of H. Finch's 17th century publication. The volume is supplemented by 60 beautiful illustrations, most useful for his discussions, and are cited in the main text of the volume. There are also 8 black and white plates of pictures between pages 118-119. These vary in style and attractiveness but adequately convey the emerging trends as Gothic scenes slowly faded away. One cavil: end notes in a volume of this type would have been helpful, (even though the suggested reading list is slight); if a new edition is ever issued one would hope for their insertion. However, this is a volume to be recommended, read and re-read again and again.