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ePub Russell on Ethics: Selections from the Writings of Bertrand Russell download

by Charles R. Pigden,Bertrand Russell

ePub Russell on Ethics: Selections from the Writings of Bertrand Russell download
Author:
Charles R. Pigden,Bertrand Russell
ISBN13:
978-0415156608
ISBN:
0415156602
Language:
Publisher:
Routledge (January 9, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1573 kb
Fb2 file:
1668 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
746

In short, Russell on Ethics is a first-rate work of moral philosophy that, for once, doesn't pretend to have the .

In short, Russell on Ethics is a first-rate work of moral philosophy that, for once, doesn't pretend to have the final word. 4 people found this helpful.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking On Ethics: Selections from the Writings of Bertrand Russell as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

by Bertrand Russell & Charles R. Pigden. The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell is a comprehensive antholog. rewrite of the chapters dealing with risk assessment and ethics, the introduction of new theories. Where there is ruin, there is hope for a treasure. 53 MB·76,326 Downloads·New! from which legal evidence is typically derived and by providing examples of cases in which. Dietary Reference Intakes. 306 Pages·2001·886 KB·21,601 Downloads·New!

Russell on Ethics presents a coherent and comprehensive collection of Russell's ethical writings, drawing on a wide . Similar books and articles. Russell on Religion: Selections From the Writings of Bertrand Russell. Bertrand Russell - 1999 - Routledge.

Russell on Ethics presents a coherent and comprehensive collection of Russell's ethical writings, drawing on a wide range of his publications on ethical concerns, many of which have been difficult t. . Russell on Metaphysics: Selections From the Writings of Bertrand Russell. Bertrand Russell - 2003 - Routledge. The Spinozistic Ethics of Bertrand Russell. Kenneth Blackwell - 1985 - Allen & Unwin. The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell Volume 21: How to Keep the Peace: The Pacifist Dilemma, 1935–38.

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1961 The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell London: George Allen & Unwin. 1999 Russell on Ethics, ed. Charles Pigden London: Routledge

1961 The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell London: George Allen & Unwin. 1961 Fact and Fiction London: George Allen & Unwin. 1969 Dear Bertrand Russell: A Selection of His Correspondence with the General Public 1950-1968, ed. Barry Feinberg and George Kasrils London: George Allen & Unwin. 1972 The Collected Stories of Bertrand Russell, ed. Barry Feinberg George Allen & Unwin. Charles Pigden London: Routledge. 1999 Russell on Religion, ed. Louis Greenspan and Stefan Andersson London: Routledge. 2001 The Selected Letters of Bertrand Russell.

The influence of religion pervades almost all Bertrand Russell's writings from his mathematical treatises to his early fiction. Russell contends with religion as a philosopher, as a historian, as a social critic and as a private individual. The papers in this volume are arranged chronologically for optimum coherence of the development of Russell's thinking and are divided into five main sections

Russell on Ethics presents a coherent and comprehensive collection of Russell's ethical writings, drawing on a wide range of his publications on ethical concerns, many of which have been difficult to access by students and general readers. Charles Pigden provides an accessible introduction to the papers, situating them within the field of ethics as a whole and detailed annotations on the papers themselves, analysing their arguments and exploring their relevance to current concerns. Russell on Ethics represents a valuable insight into Russell as an ethicist, which will be useful to both specialist and non-specialist alike.
  • Bought for my son because this philosopher was so formative to my thinking. I think everyone should at least be familiar with him. He speaks on the philosophy and morality of the issues of modern society.

  • Russell was a sharp writer. This collection of essays co-authored and edited by Pigden is a great point to introduce ethics to an slightly more sophisticated audience.

  • While I only agree with him about half the time, I have always had great respect for Bertrand Russell. As a philosopher, his prime interest was coming to the best reasoned conclusion, even if it meant ceding an argument, admitting error, or (publically) changing his mind. In my opinion, this truth-seeking-no-matter-what-the-consequences attitude is what made Russell so great and it is this quality that is on display in "Russell on Ethics."

    As this book is quite chronological (still divided by subtopics within metaethics), we get to witness Russell's evolution from Hegelian to Moorean to error theorist to (reluctant) emotivist. The fun comes in watching Russeel argue out of a position he argued FOR in a previous essay. Again, Russell was one of only a few philosophers with which I am aware (with Wittgenstein and Rawls) to publically change their mind about certain positions they have held. Seeing Russell do this is alone worth the price of the book.

    But for all of us emotivists (and those who dislike us!) there is another reason to read the book. Seeing Russell's steady adoption of emotivism (in various forms) indirectly helps to explicate why emotivism is so appealing.

    First, we see Russell struggle to find some non-emotion-laden account of moral reasoning. But alas, moral reasoning always hangs on a (subjective) 'ought' rather than an (objective) 'is.' Thus, like Hume, Russell finally concluded that while reason can reason so long as an 'is' is in the picture, emotion is all that is left when 'ought' becomes the question.

    Next (but to a lesser degree) we see Russell ask another question: If ethics is in any way objective, then how do we explain the fact that there is so much moral disagreement? If a people are split on a moral issue 50/50 (or 25/25/25/25!), is it bettter to suppose (a) that 50% (or 75%!) are just wrong, or (b) that different people have different emotions on the matter that can neither be called right or wrong? Reluctantly, Russell graduallly chooses (b). (After all, if we call an emotional judgment 'right' or 'wrong,' then we have to base that judgment in some objective meta-standard and there is certainly no agreement on what THAT is!)

    Russell's ambivalence towards emotivism (on the one hand seeing it as the best metaethical theory, but on the other, yearning for some objectivity in ethics), is another intersting thing to watch. It is intersting for a few reasons. First, it is indicative of the attitude Russell admirably brought towards philosophy: get the right answer, even if it is the one that doesn't make you feel the best. (Undoubtedly, this is why he was so opposed to pragmatism.)

    It is also intersting because all of subjectivists/relativists (of any stripe, can identify with Russell's ambivalence. No matter how convinced we are that relativism/subjectivism is the most accurate philosophy, all of us WISH it were not so. To paraphrase Russell, we might reason that "Torture/rape/etc. is wrong," is a relative/subjective statement, but we still have the urge that it should be universal/objective. In all of us, as in Russell, there is that part of us that still believes in particular moral stances so much that, despite our philosophic selves, we can't help seeing them as more than subjective preferences.

    In this, Russell is the very picture of honesty. Thus, Russell on Ethics is not only interesting from a meta-ethical standpoint, but also as a reminder of how philosophy should be done. Russell was clearly not afraid to listen to opposing ideas only to be swayed by them. Nor was he afraid to come to conclusions that, while not emotionally satisfying, were philosophically sound (only to be honest about how emotionally unsatisfying they are).

    In short, Russell on Ethics is a first-rate work of moral philosophy that, for once, doesn't pretend to have the final word.

  • I think "Bert" is a brilliant man and a terrific author, but most (if not all) of the essays in this book are really dry and uninteresting. The best part of the book was Bertrand's discussion of what the word "should" means. He concludes that "should" in most instances mearly means that if you do x, someone specific would approve. For example, "you should be kind to others" means nothing more than "if you are kind to others, those people will experience a feeling of approval regarding your actions." Other than that, the book was pretty painful to read. I recommend Why I Am Not A Christian or Unpopular Essays instead. I give this book 2 stars because nobody should ever give Bertrand Russell one star (if you did, he would disapprove!)