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ePub Combined Fleet Decoded: The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War II download

by John Prados

ePub Combined Fleet Decoded: The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War II download
Author:
John Prados
ISBN13:
978-1557504319
ISBN:
1557504318
Language:
Publisher:
Naval Inst Pr; 1 edition (November 1, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1309 kb
Fb2 file:
1328 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr mobi lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
476

In Combined Fleet Decoded, author John Prados presents us with a history of the gathering and use of intelligence . The time period covered is the two decades preceding the war, on through to the cessation of hostilities in 1945.

In Combined Fleet Decoded, author John Prados presents us with a history of the gathering and use of intelligence by both sides in the Pacific war. All participants are examined on the Allied side, not just the . but also the Dutch, British and Australians.

Prados has written over 20 books. Combined Fleet Decoded: The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War II. Random House.

Combined Fleet Decoded book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Combined Fleet Decoded: The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War II as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Combined Fleet Decoded taught me more new material regarding the Japanese navy and the . Intelligence surveying that Japanese navy than I had learned in the past 15 years of reading Second World War books and watching documentary-type DVDs such as the History Channel. That is not a crack at other books, DVDs and the History Channel. Pacific Odyssey and the Brith of Mondern Intel. com User, August 20, 2005.

SAFE FOR DEMOCRACY ALSO BY JOHN PRADOS Hoodwinked . World War II Through the Persian Gulf. Combined Fleet Decoded: The Secret History of .

SAFE FOR DEMOCRACY ALSO BY JOHN PRADOS Hoodwinked: The Documents That Reveal How Bush Sold Us a War (e. Inside the Pentagon Papers (e. with Margaret Pratt Porter) The White House. Intelligence and the. Japanese Navy in World War II. The Hidden History of the Vietnam War. Valley of Decision: The Siege of Khe Sanh (with Ray W. Stubbe). Keepers of the Keys: A History of the National Security Council from.

COMBINED FLEET DECODED The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War I.

COMBINED FLEET DECODED The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War II. By John Prados.

Combined Fleet Decoded is an interesting book on the American .

Combined Fleet Decoded is an interesting book on the American intelligence efforts to break the Imperial Japanese Navy codes and to predict its next strikes and operations. Among them, four books are devoted to intelligence and secret operations topics, including Presidents’ Secret Wars and The Soviet Estimate.

Written in the style of a thriller but solidly based on an array of sources, this study reinterprets the entire sea campaign in the Pacific, using intelligence as the missing key to the Allied success. It examines every aspect of the secret war of intelligence--from radio dispatches and espionage to vital information from prisoners and document translation--showing how U.S. intelligence outsmarted Japan nearly every step of the way. The resulting assessment is a virtual rewriting of history that challenges previous conceptions about the Pacific conflict.

John Prados relates the growing intelligence knowledge on both sides to the progress and outcome of naval actions. Along the way he offers a wealth of revelations that include data on how the United States caught the superbattleship Yamato and the impact of intelligence on the initial campaigns in the Philippines and Netherlands East Indies and the escape of American codebreakers from Corregidor. He also provides colorful vignettes of personalities who shaped the secret intelligence war. This ambitious work is not simply a rundown of code-breaking successes, but an astonishing demonstration of how the day-to-day accumulation of knowledge can produce extraordinary results. Its accounting of Japanese intelligence is unprecedented in detail. Its reassessment of battles and campaigns is presented not just in terms of troops or ships but in how the secret war actually played out. Lauded as a major new study when published in hardcover in 1995, the book remains the most comprehensive study written. For sheer drama and gut-level operational practicality, it ranks with the very best.

  • In Combined Fleet Decoded, author John Prados presents us with a history of the gathering and use of intelligence by both sides in the Pacific war. The time period covered is the two decades preceding the war, on through to the cessation of hostilities in 1945. All participants are examined on the Allied side, not just the U.S., but also the Dutch, British and Australians. Whereas most historical accounts highlight radio intelligence and cryptanalysis, Prados runs the gamut of other types of intelligence as well: naval attachés, air and photo reconnaissance, salvage of critical documents from sunken or captured enemy vessels, prisoner interrogation and coast watchers are all covered. Prados benefits immeasurably from having written this book when he did, in the 1990s, after the declassification of many Pacific war intelligence documents that occurred around 1980 or so. My attention was first drawn to Combined Fleet Decoded because so many recent works cite it as a secondary source, such as Parshall and Tully's Shattered Sword, Lundstrom's Black Shoe Carrier Admiral, Hornfischer's Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors, and undoubtedly many more that I have yet to encounter.

    Prados is explicit as to where he believes intelligence stands regarding U. S. success in so thoroughly defeating Japan. He states that starting with Coral Sea and Midway, on through the conquest of the Solomon Islands, it was intelligence that provided the edge for the U.S. to prevail, since materially the two antagonists were roughly even. Once the second generation American fleet carriers and fighter planes began to arrive in the Pacific, and Nimitz's central Pacific drive started with the Gilberts and Marshalls invasions, the Japanese fell behind rapidly in resources, with the gap only widening through the remainder of the war. It is in this second phase that Allied intelligence was no longer the predominant factor for U.S. success. From then on, it was the far superior industrial output of the U.S. that provided the ever increasing margin of victory, but with intelligence still a very important force multiplier.

    Combined Fleet Decoded is a complete history of the Pacific war, viewed from the perspective of intelligence. If the book were arranged thematically, without respect to the narrative of the Pacific war, it would still be of great value due to its thoroughness. However, the author does provide a narrative, and the topics regarding intelligence are presented and discussed at the point that they appear in the story. Therefore, we get a compelling story, the pace of which is kept up by intelligence developments along the way. Although a complete history of the Pacific war, Combined Fleet Decoded is not an ideal introduction to the topic. As another reviewer has mentioned, it would be helpful to the Pacific war neophyte to first read Samuel Morison's nine volumes on the Pacific theater to get a grasp on the geography, personalities and chronology of operations, so that Combined Fleet Decoded could be better understood and appreciated.

  • Very highly recommended - an absolute must-read for serious students of the war in the Pacific.

    Prados thoroughly addresses intelligence gathering and analysis on both the U.S. and Japanese sides. However, what stands out most is the depth of information on the Japanese experience. Can't think of another title that provides nearly as much insight into Japanese thinking as the war in the Pacific progressed. His discussions of Decisive Battle are nuanced and enlightening.

    Moreover, meticulous timeline reconstruction based on intercepts and decrypts, traffic and signals analysis, etc. allows Prados to dispel many of the widely-held inaccuracies and outright myths around many of the strategy decisions and battles in the Pacific during WW2 and puts this in the same class as Parshall/Tully's Shattered Sword (Midway).

  • The author did a good job at presenting how each side treated intelligence. If it lacked anything I would say it was in presented limited reasons why the Japanese tended to ignore or pay lip-service to intelligence. Was it part of their culture? The author did a good job describing where the Japanese went forward with plans in spite of limited understanding of the enemy potential. While the author could have done better in that area I thought he did a good job of contrasting the differences between the Japanese and Americans in this area.

  • John Padros has a very relaxed and easy to follow writing style. He's able to add details without overwhelming the reader. One decision I like is that he presents and discusses the differing viewpoints or conflicting information regarding issues and then leaves it to the reader to decide what seems the most feasible.

    Like reading the backgrounds of the different Americian and Japanese personalities involved in the Pacific War. Not alot of overwhelming details but enough that each person when mentioned becomes a distinct character.

    Very enjoyable and informative read; highly recommended for those interested in greater detail about events of the Pacific War.

  • The definitive book on decoding the Japanese Navy's secret messages. Thoroughly researched and well documents.

  • It filled in a lot of info on WW2 that I hadn't known. As a former navy crypto officer, I had hoped for more details on how the Japanese code was broken.

  • This book tells the Pacific War from the point of view of both sides' intelligence forces, focusing on SIGINT and COMINT analysis. If that sounds dry, the story is fascinating and riveting. Essential reading for anyone interested in the Pacific War or the consumption of military intelligence.

  • Extremely informative book on how the United States navy was able to defeat a vey good Japanee navy