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ePub Princess Sultana's Daughters download

by Jean Sasson

ePub Princess Sultana's Daughters download
Author:
Jean Sasson
ISBN13:
978-0967673752
ISBN:
0967673755
Language:
Publisher:
Windsor-Brooke Books, LLC; 1 edition (January 1, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1896 kb
Fb2 file:
1604 kb
Other formats:
mobi lit txt docx
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
370

PRINCESS SULTANA’S DAUGHTERS A Saudi Arabian woman’s intimate revelations about sex, love, marriage -and the fate of her beautiful daughters- behind the veil Jean Sasson .

PRINCESS SULTANA’S DAUGHTERS A Saudi Arabian woman’s intimate revelations about sex, love, marriage -and the fate of her beautiful daughters- behind the veil Jean Sasson . Princess sultana’s daughters. A Saudi Arabian woman’s intimate. revelations about sex, love, marriage. and the fate of her beautiful daughters-.

Listeners of Princess were gripped by Jean Sasson's powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil. Princess Sultana's Daughters MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged. by. Jean Sasson (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

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Princess Sultana's Daughters book. Readers of PRINCESS were gripped by Jean Sasson's powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil. Now, in the compelling sequel, Jean Sasson and Princess Sultana turn the spotlight on Sultana's two teenage daughters, Maha and Amani. As second-generation members of the royal family who have benefited from Saudi oil wealth, Maha and Amani are surrounded by untold Readers of PRINCESS were gripped by Jean Sasson's powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil.

While exploring the troubles of Princess Sultana's daughters, Sultana and Sasson never tire in their quest to expose the injustices Saudi Arabian society levels against women. Princess Sultana once more strikes a chord among all women who are lucky enough to have the freedom to speak out for themselves.

Jean P. Sasson (born 1950, Troy, Alabama, United States) is an American writer whose work mainly centers around women in the Middle East. Growing up in a small town, Sasson found adventure between the pages of books. Her strong desire to uproot herself from her rural surroundings led her to jump at the opportunity to work and travel abroad. In 1978 she traveled to Saudi Arabia to work in the King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh as an administrative coordinator of medical affairs

Princess sultana’s circle. Book III in the Princess Trilogy.

Princess sultana’s circle. In Princess Sultana’s Daughters, the princess and I told the world that her immediate family had learned that she was the princess behind the book, Princess, which had become a bestseller in many countries, but that the secret of her identity had been maintained as far as the rest of the royal family was concerned. Readers also learned that despite Sultana’s constant battle against the status quo, and her own relatively enlightened marriage, her own two daughters did not escape the pressures of feudal prejudices against women in Saudi Arabia.

Princess Sultana's daughters. Sasson, Jean P. Publication date. Their dramatic and shocking stories, together with many more which concern other members of Princess Sultana's huge family, are set against a rich backcloth of Saudi Arabian culture and social mores which re depicted with equal color and authenticity. We learn, for example, of the fascinating ritual of the world-famous annual pilgrimage to Makkah as we accompany the princess and her family to this holiest of cities. Throughout, however, Sultana never tires of her quest to expose the injustices which her society levels against women.

Reader's of Princess Sultana's true story, Princess, were gripped by her powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil within the royal family of Saudi Arabia. Now, the princess and Jean Sasson turn the spotlight on Sultana's two teenage daughters, Maha and Amani. During her own youth, Sultana chafed under the harsh social system into which she was born.

Readers of Princess Sultana's extraordinary biography Princess were gripped by her powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil within the royal family of Saudi Arabia. They were every bit as fascinated by the sequel, Daughters of Arabia

Readers of Princess Sultana's extraordinary biography Princess were gripped by her powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil within the royal family of Saudi Arabia. They were every bit as fascinated by the sequel, Daughters of Arabia. Here, the princess turns the spotlight on her two daughters, Maha and Amani, both teenagers. Surrounded by untold opulence and luxury from the day they were born, but stifled by the unbearably restrictive lifestyle imposed on them, they reacted in equally desperate ways.

Reader's of Princess Sultana's true story, Princess, were gripped by her powerful indictment of women's lives behind the veil within the royal family of Saudi Arabia. Now, the princess and Jean Sasson turn the spotlight on Sultana's two teenage daughters, Maha and Amani. During her own youth, Sultana chafed under the harsh social system into which she was born. Today, despite untold wealth and privilege, Princess Sultana cannot buy the rights and freedoms women in other cultures possess, for herself, or for her daughters. Although Sultana lives with a constant fear of retribution--even death at the hand of her own father or brother, her passion to provide her two daughters with a better life transcends her fear and fuels her desire for change.As second-generation members of the royal family who have benefited from Saudi oil wealth, Maha and Amani have known nothing but opulence and wealth from the moment of their birth. Yet, stilled by the unbearable restrictive lifestyle imposed on them, Maha and Amani have reacted in equally desperate ways.Maha is a headstrong beauty driven by fear and isolation due to Saudi Arabia's feudal justice. Described by her father as a girl of brilliant fragments, Maha's gifted mind cannot focus on one goal. When Maha becomes involved in a lesbian relationship, she ends having an emotional breakdown and requires psychiatric treatment in London. Amani, the youngest daughter, rebels in her way during the religious frenzy of Haj, the annual Muslim pilgrimage to Makkah. Once a sweet and placid animal-lover, Amani emerges almost overnight from her dormant religious faith and embraces Islamic beliefs with unnerving intensity. Amani's fundamental fanaticism threatens to destroy her mother's personal quest to imporove women's lot in her native land. With candor and humility, Sultana shares the joy, frustration, and dark intervals of my fear of Saudi Arabian motherhood and marriage. She details the difficulties inherent in raising d
  • After reading the first book about Princess Saltana (Princess) I knew that Daughters would be fascinating. And it is! The book discusses her 2 daughters and 1 son and picks up where her last book left off. Her youngest daughter is a devout Muslim with an extremely oppressive mentality towards her society. Her second child is a wild child by Saudi standards but her mother loves her just the same. And Princess Saltana's oldest child, her son is as compassionate and liberated as his mother. She raised him well. This story takes place in Saudi Arabia where women are treated as second class citizens. The men use their religion to justify all sorts of heinous crimes which is sickening when I thick about it. These men who degrade women are cowards but they get away with anything they want. In the USA they would be called pedophiles and locked up in jail. But in Saudi Arabia they are free to do exactly as they please. This is also about a country that regards wealth and physical attributes of the most important things in life, money and sex go hand and hand. And women are treated as property to gain social and economic power. Princess Saltana is a heroine for telling her story, even though her family found out about her first book. She is also a heroine for preaching women's rights in a land that has no rights for women. She is a heroine because she sees hope in the future for the women of her country. The book isn't only about her daughters it is also about Princess Saltana's life and family. She is a deeply moving person with a lot of conviction. And I can only hope that one day all the women in her country will be treated with the basic human rights that they all deserve - but do not have. I just found out there is a third book about Princess Saltana titled Princess Saltana's Circle, I am sure it will be an interesting read too. Also I want to say that Jean Sasson is a genius and a brilliant writer!

  • I read "Princess" and was absolutely enthralled for about 3/4 of the book. I'm glad I read Princess Sultana's Daughters because I was curious how a person could have shared so much of their life experiences and not expect her identity to be revealed. This, the second book of the series reminded me that children who are raised in such an insular society have trouble developing strong values. I also wondered how they coped with the world in the 2000's. I completed this book, but really should have stopped after reading Princess.

  • It can be the USA or the highest society in Mexico City or another part of the world like Asia or the Middle East and women are found as part of a yet unacknowledged worldwide women's sisterhood all fighting for the same rights and full recognition given to men for half the work women do. Princess Sultana is no exception but even in her privileged status she speaks out for the injustice done by men to women financially and socially like the story she relates of the humble grandmother she knew and aided in the hope to stop the forced circumcision the woman's granddaughter was going to suffer. An abominable tradition not always followed but They failed.

    East or West women share the same inequality and discrimination camouflaged in different forms and shapes in family tradition. culture, religion or myths created by men and followed by women who are too burdened by work and responsibilities to care to analyze.

    In the US there's many forms of injustice despite "advances". Theres many Anita Hills serving a Clarence Thomas for survival of her job and professional position. Seldom a woman will shackle her chains loud enough to be heard. The main reason is the fear of rebellion who will make men put a women in check by making her to loose her privileges at home or in the office, or maybe both. A woman's highest handicap is her ignorance and perceived inability to fight for her rights. the acceptance of an unrecognized gender injustice imposed on her in subtle and not so subtle ways.

    women keep a forced silence for fear of loosing status and privilege and being set apart as "difficult" just as Anita Hill was. Too much is lost. We have one life. Princess Sultana is far away from us in Saudi Arabia and she makes us feel free and safe to evaluate and criticize a different culture and the status of Saudi women as mothers, wives and at times as secret lovers. Her obstacles are immense in a society ruled by religion and government enforced by a few. So strong is the double weapon of clergy and royalty that the holiest book: the
    Koran with all its wisdom and directives is twisted and misquoted
    To satisfy the will and lust of powerful men who rule over so many women.

    the liberation seed implanted by the Princess starts to germinate within us and we start to assess our own system and situation.

    We gain empowerment sharing the dreams and sorrows of a strong woman living a privileged status as Princess Sultana enjoying royal life with all its pains and a good share of almost insurmountable temptations to blind us all to the injustice done to Saudi women by men but Sultana is a woman who is not blinded by luxury and money to silence her conscience and sense of justice. Other women in her family are blinded by diamonds, travel and precious rubies. Unafraid of no one Sultana speaks for the truth and shackles submissiveness in traditional roles. Her husband and males around her learn to fear her and respect her. She fights and looses battles but speaks The truth loud and clear for other women to hear and fight for in their own societies around the world, rich or poor, single or married, beautiful or plain. For themselves and for their daughters and in doing so they begin to transform men of the next generation. Her own son helps a bride escape the clutches of her disapproving family and reunites her away from Saudi Arabia to the husband
    She would have lost forever.

    Princess Sultana becomes a friend to every woman alive. Her story is easy and entertaining to read as a woman who sought balance and justice in an oppressive society. she gives us hope and the strength and power to fight for our own unclaimed freedoms and be valued as workers, wives and mothers. By becoming part of Sultanas inner circle we begin to question ourselves, our roles And expectations in the particular society in which we live in and gradually grow to recognize the subtle and insidious ways women are mentally manipulated by men supported by the cultural and economic myths that sustain the "technical" and "modern and progressive" advanced
    society in which men created and support.

    Yes, Saudi Arabia does not allow women to drive yet and voting, I believe, is a recent privilege but How many women Presidents have we had in the US? We had Indira Gandhi in India, Golda Mayer in Israel and at least half a dozen supreme heads of state in Latin Ametica in the past and present.

    But how many women Presidents in the US? Why not so far?

    Princess Sultans books far from entertaining are a loving inviting hand not only into her world but a world inside yourself that will empower you to reclaim a world that is yours yet unclaimed. Highly readable and entertaining. Five stars not enough. It opened my eyes and gave me a better sense of the gender battle ground in every society.