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by Joseph Campbell

ePub Thou Art That: Transforming Religious Metaphor download
Author:
Joseph Campbell
ISBN13:
978-1458757739
ISBN:
1458757730
Language:
Publisher:
ReadHowYouWant; 16th ed. edition (December 28, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1537 kb
Fb2 file:
1404 kb
Other formats:
txt azw mobi docx
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
322

A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living.

A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living. The Gatekeepers - Women of Myth & Wisdom.

Thou Art That is a book by Joseph Campbell exploring the mythological underpinnings of the Judeo-Christian tradition. Published by New World Library in 2001, Thou Art That was the first title in the Joseph Campbell Foundation's Collected Works of Joseph Campbell series. Thou Art That page on the JCF site.

Thou Art That is a compilation of previously uncollected essays and lectures by Joseph Campbell that focus on the Judeo-Christian tradition. Here Campbell explores common religious symbols, reexamining and reinterpreting them in the context of his remarkable knowledge of world mythology

Thou Art That is a compilation of previously uncollected essays and lectures by Joseph Campbell that focus on the Judeo-Christian tradition. Here Campbell explores common religious symbols.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Thou Art That: Transforming Religious Metaphor as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Thou Art That: Transforming Religious Metaphor. This applies to the journey that the making of this book required, for many of Joseph Campbell’s insights into Judeo-Christian symbols and myths were embedded in lectures in which they were but examples of broader themes. So, too, question periods mined out of him, so to speak, treasures of learning that might not otherwise have come to the surface. Campbell explores common religious symbols, reexamining and reinterpreting them in the context of his remarkable knowledge of world mythology. Campbell believed that society often confuses the literal and metaphorical interpretations of religious stories and symbols. In this collection, he eloquently reestablishes these symbols as a means to enhance spiritual understanding and mystical revelation.

Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

Woven from Joseph Campbell’s previously unpublished work, this volume .

book by Joseph Campbell. This title focuses on the symbols and metaphors of Judeo-Christian tradition and investigates how modern culture often misinterprets them. The scope of the text ranges across religious and mytholgical history to geography. The style is one of scholarly story-telling.

Thou Art That : Transforming Religious Metaphor. Collected Works of Joseph Campbell. His works, including the four-volume The Masks of God and The Power of Myth (with Bill Moyers), rank among the classics in mythology and literature. Eugene Kennedy, PhD is a psychologist, syndicated columnist, and a professor emeritus of Loyola University Chicago. A laicized Catholic priest, he has written over fifty books on psychology, religion, the Catholic church, and the psychology of religion.

Thou Art That is a compilation of previously uncollected essays and lectures by Joseph Campbell that focus on the Judeo-Christian tradition. Campbell explores common religious symbols, reexamining and reinterpreting them in the context of his remarkable knowledge of world mythology. Campbell believed that society often confuses the literal and metaphorical interpretations of religious stories and symbols. In this collection, he eloquently reestablishes these symbols as a means to enhance spiritual understanding and mystical revelation. With characteristic verve, he ranges from rich storytelling to insightful comparative scholarship. Included is editor Eugene Kennedy's classic interview with Campbell in the New York Times Magazine, which originally brought the scholar to the attention of the public.
  • I am an ardent admirer of Campbell, and purchased the Kindle edition of this title eagerly, based on the Amazon reviews. The content, of course, is Campbell at his best and most succinct, but Kindle readers should be aware that this edition suffers from a clunky format, lack of meaningful proofreading, and hideous overuse of badly programmed auto-typing. The letters B.c. show up throughout the text as cryptic auto fill for seemingly random words, making one wish for Robert Langdon's assistance in decoding. This is not a .99¢ edition, this is a full price edition, and it is discourteous to both the author and purchasers to present it in such a fashion. I purchased the hardback edition to give as a gift, and it did not have these issues. Please show your customers the respect of a thoroughly proofread and corrected version to replace this edition in our kindle libraries.

  • All of the work I have read by Joseph Campbell is amazing, life changing literature and this book was no different.

    That said, it was tremendously disappointing to see that in this book, when he refers to Christ using a pronoun, such as he him or his, the first letter is capitalized - He, Him, His. However, when referring to other significant historical figures, such as the Buddha, the first letter of the pronouns he him and his are not capitalized.

    This book was published after Campbell's death and drawn from material in his video recorded lectures and unpublished works. When one looks at the works he published during his life, such as the Hero with a Thousand Faces, one does not encounter this sort of biased capitalization. Christ is referred to as he him or his. The h is not capitalized.

    This may seem like a minor point of contention, but it is significant to me because Campbell spent his 60+ year career uncovering and illuminating for us the thread of universal truth woven across the tapestry of all religions. So for me at least, this kind of capitalization bias misrepresents his work. It sends an unspoken signal to the reader that he thought one religion was superior to others. He did not. The fact that there is no capitalization bias in the works he published while he was still alive is a testament to that fact. The capitalization bias is, in that regard, a betrayal of his work and his legacy. Joseph Campbell saw and shows us the universal truth of all spiritual paths in his work without bias or preference, that is something that deserves to be honored and preserved.

  • Item timely delivered damage-free as promised. Excellent book! As time passes I am becoming more and more aware that a knowledge of the writings and concepts of both Joseph Campbell and Karl Jung provide an introduction into the mysterious workings of the human unconscious mind, and how these workings affect human mythology and human religion. This is a deep and mysterious subject; and, no matter how much one reads, one never quite reaches the end of it. It is a continuous and life-long study; and for me, the writings of Joseph Campbell and Karl Jung are a excellent place to start. We must continuously remind ourselves many times over that all human knowledge is partial and incomplete; and our study and research never really end. However, what an enjoyable pursuit!

  • This book is written by The Joseph Campbell foundation based on his works. Here is a pro and con of collected works: The book is written in more modern speech etiquette than Joseph Campbell's original works, making it easier to understand; as the way we speak changed a lot in 50 years. The editors did piece together some information that makes a different meaning out of context with an original work. Example: "Religions protect people from experiencing God." has a different acceptability when read in context within the book, "Inner Reaches of Outer Space".
    The book brings mysticism into scientific Atheism and helps people accept religion as mythology. Joseph explains how religions share similar archetypes, while being completely different. The source of these religions entered man's imagination from the same infinite mystery; the way the religions where interpreted was based on the persons scientific understanding of that time and place.

  • When we are raised in the West within the Judeo-Christian tradition, we tend to have Church teachings drilled into our heads as the one-and-only factual truth. Other religious traditions (e.g. AmerIndian tales, Greco-Roman myths, IndoChinese icons) are silly and only fools put their faith in them. As we age, we may realize that Eve being made out of a rib and talking to a snake is no more reasonable a story than the Earth being formed from the back of a turtle or Zeus fathering children as a bull. It is at the point of this realization that many lose all faith in a spiritual life.

    Joseph Campbell teaches that the insistence upon believing any religious metaphor is to confuse the purpose of a myth. Instead of putting our beliefs in the denotation (the factual truth) we are meant to realize the connotation (the transcendent truth to which the myth points). As the Buddha reportedly said, pointing to the Moon, "My hand is not the Moon." Myths are pointers to the truth. The stories they tell are not the truths themselves. In Thou Art That, Joseph Campbell illuminates the myths of the Judeo-Christian tradition to reveal their place among myths from all cultures and times, and give guidance toward realizing the truths to which the myths point.

    Highly recommended to anyone wondering how to realize the spiritual truth hidden beneath a dull religious life.