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ePub Clausewitz and Chaos: Friction in War and Military Policy download

by Stephen J. Cimbala

ePub Clausewitz and Chaos: Friction in War and Military Policy download
Author:
Stephen J. Cimbala
ISBN13:
978-0275969516
ISBN:
0275969517
Language:
Publisher:
Praeger (November 30, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1850 kb
Fb2 file:
1960 kb
Other formats:
lit mbr txt mbr
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
801

Clausewitz and Chaos book. Cimbala applies the concept of friction to a number of 20th century cases of war and policy making.

Clausewitz and Chaos book. He also applies it to some plausible scenarios for the next century. military planners and policy makers appear to place their faith in technology as the sine qua non of success in security and defense policy, technology can be self defeating and myopic if political and strategic vision are lacking.

Cimbala applies the concept of friction to a number of 20th century cases of war and policy making. The great Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz, in his classic "On War," introduced the idea of friction in war. Friction was one of the most important ideas that Clausewitz put forward.

This book is yet another endorsement of Clausewitz's military theory-specifically, his descriptive analysis of friction in wa. Military Persuasion in War and Policy: The Power of Soft By Stephen J. Cimbala Praeger, 2002.

This book is yet another endorsement of Clausewitz's military theory-specifically, his descriptive analysis of friction in war. It attempts to draw contours between "classical" Clausewitzian military theory and contemporary chaos theory. Thus, it is the union of two schools of thought-one that has stood the test of time and acquired nearly biblical prestige in military and political circles, and one that is struggling to make a mark. Military Heretics: The Unorthodox in Policy and Strategy By B. J. C. McKercher; A. Hamish Ion Praeger, 1994.

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Clausewitz and Chaos. Friction in War and Military Policy. by Stephen J. Cimbala. Published November 30, 2000 by Praeger Publishers.

Carl Philipp Gottfried (or Gottlieb) von Clausewitz (/ˈklaʊzəvɪts/; 1 June 1780 – 16 November 1831) was a Prussian general and military theorist who stressed the "moral" (meaning, in modern terms, psychological) and political aspects of war. His most notable work, Vom Kriege (On. His most notable work, Vom Kriege (On War), was unfinished at his death. Clausewitz was a realist in many different senses and, while in some respects a romantic, also drew heavily on the rationalist ideas of the European Enlightenment.

cal innovations that exploit chaos theory will change the hardware of war. On the theoretical level, it offers up a new foundation o. .

A shift in framework is not a panacea - war and diplomacy will remain as demanding and dangerous as ever - but if we wish to pull ourselves out of the current analytical stagnation, 9 we must recognize the assumptions that permeate our strategic culture and open ourselves to new frameworks. 10. The Discipline of Chaos. cal innovations that exploit chaos theory will change the hardware of war. On the theoretical level, it offers up a new foundation of strategic thought.

London, Westport, Conn Library availability. Setting a reading intention helps you organise your reading.

Stephen J. Cimbala, Clausewitz and Chaos: Friction in War and Military Policy, Westport, CT: Praeger, 2001, pp. 7-14. While somewhat controversial, this book contributes important insights to the nature of the strategic environment. 78 22. Course 2 Course Directive AY 2005: War, National Security Policy & Strategy, Carlisle Barracks, PA: Department of National Security and Strategy, . Army War College, 2004, p. 158. 23. Joint Publication 1-02, p. 360. 24. Ibid.

Cimbala analyzes military persuasion-the art of using armed force to support diplomacy, deterrence, crisis management, unconventional conflicts, peace operations, and other military activities short of major conventional war. As he shows, military persuasion requires that policy makers and diplomats understand the subtle interaction between force and diplomacy; each supports, or destroys, the other, depending upon the situation. Even conventional wars have aspects of armed persuasion.

The great Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz, in his classic On War, introduced the idea of friction in war. Friction was one of the most important ideas that Clausewitz put forward. His application of the term is generally taken to be limited to events on the field of battle. But had Clausewitz lived to the end of the 20th century, he undoubtedly would have broadened his understanding of friction to include the nexus between war and policy making. He would have done so because his most fundamental insight, apart from the significance of friction in war, was his insistence upon the priority of policy over war.

Cimbala applies the concept of friction to a number of 20th century cases of war and policy making. He also applies it to some plausible scenarios for the next century. Although many U.S. military planners and policy makers appear to place their faith in technology as the sine qua non of success in security and defense policy, technology can be self defeating and myopic if political and strategic vision are lacking. For example, the mindless pursuit of information warfare in all its varieties may convince potential U.S. opponents that infowar is a cost effective way of negating U.S. military power. A provocative analysis for scholars, students, military professionals and other policy makers involved with strategy and military policy issues.