mostraligabue
» » Roman Landscape: Culture and Identity (New Surveys in the Classics)

ePub Roman Landscape: Culture and Identity (New Surveys in the Classics) download

by Diana Spencer

ePub Roman Landscape: Culture and Identity (New Surveys in the Classics) download
Author:
Diana Spencer
ISBN13:
978-1107400245
ISBN:
1107400244
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (March 31, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1603 kb
Fb2 file:
1434 kb
Other formats:
mobi doc rtf lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
184

This survey explores how and why Romans of the late Republic and early Principate were fascinated with landscaped nature. Series: New Surveys in the Classics (Book 39).

This survey explores how and why Romans of the late Republic and early Principate were fascinated with landscaped nature. Thematic discussions and case studies work through what 'landscape' represented and how studying Roman identity in terms of place, environment and the natural world helps us better to understand Rome itself.

Diana Spencer is a professor of classics and Dean of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences at the University of Birmingham. As an undergraduate, Spencer attended Trinity College, Dublin, where she was awarded a BA (Hons) in Modern English and Classical Civilization in 1991. She completed an MA in Late Antique and Early Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London in 1992

Автор: Spencer Название: Roman Landscape: Culture and Identity .

This book tackles how and why 'landscape' (farms, gardens, countryside) set the scene in the first . Thus, the most important results of the study include modelling the spatial pattern of Roman continuity in the present landscape.

This book tackles how and why 'landscape' (farms, gardens, countryside) set the scene in the first centuries BCE and CE for Romans keen to talk up and about (but also to scrutinize and understand) what it meant to be a citizen. It investigates what 'landscape' means now and reflects upon how contemporary approaches to 'landscape' can enrich our understanding of ancient experience of the interface between natural and artificial space.

Roman Landscape: Culture and Identity. Luxury villas and working farms are crucial to Roman interest in what constitutes landscape, and they form the backdrop for this Survey's final two chapters. Page/Article number Title Type Online publication date. By the mid-first century BCE, lavishly designed and decorated villas represented not just a source of revenue qualifying their wealthy and educated owners for entering public life, but also an alternative performance venue to the traditional urban sites for political debate – Senate and Forum.

Biographical and contact information for Dr Diana Spencer in the Department of Classics at the University of. .I enjoy investigating how identity and cultural politics are manifest through narratives emphasising space, territory, cultivation of place, and ethos

Biographical and contact information for Dr Diana Spencer in the Department of Classics at the University of Birmingham. I enjoy investigating how identity and cultural politics are manifest through narratives emphasising space, territory, cultivation of place, and ethos.

New Surveys in the Classics. This book tackles how and why 'landscape' (farms, gardens, countryside) set the scene in the first centuries BCE and CE for Romans keen to talk up and about (but also to scrutinize and understand) what it meant to be a citizen. New Surveys in the Classics. Cambridge University Press.

More Info: Greece & Rome New Surveys in the Classics 39. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

This book tackles how and why 'landscape' (farms, gardens, countryside) set the scene in the first centuries BCE and CE for Romans keen to talk up and about (but also to scrutinize and understand) what it meant to be a citizen more. More Info: Greece & Rome New Surveys in the Classics 39. Greece & Rome New Surveys in the Classics, no. 39. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press for the Classical Association, 2011. 1–20 (6–20 in color).

This book tackles how and why 'landscape' (farms, gardens, countryside) set the scene in the first centuries BCE and CE for Romans keen to talk up and about (but also to scrutinize and understand) what it meant to be a citizen. It investigates what 'landscape' means now and reflects upon how contemporary approaches to 'landscape' can enrich our understanding of ancient experience of the interface between natural and artificial space. It encourages examination of 'landscape' from a range of angles, suggesting alternative ways of thinking about what landscape represents. These methodological approaches (presented initially via a set of key terms and definitions and then deployed thematically across four chapters), combined with a detailed interdisciplinary bibliography and a series of case studies of literary texts and material sites, enable readers to use this survey as a starting point for developing their own in-depth study.