mostraligabue
» » Dirty German: Everyday Slang from (Dirty Everyday Slang)

ePub Dirty German: Everyday Slang from (Dirty Everyday Slang) download

by Daniel Chaffey

ePub Dirty German: Everyday Slang from (Dirty Everyday Slang) download
Author:
Daniel Chaffey
ISBN13:
978-1569756737
ISBN:
1569756732
Language:
Publisher:
Ulysses Press; Bilingual edition (April 28, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1988 kb
Fb2 file:
1276 kb
Other formats:
docx rtf txt doc
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
590

Dirty Everyday Slang). 178 Pages · 2009 · . 8 MB · 524 Downloads ·English. formality and bust out with expressions they never teach you in school, including:, Cool slang, Funny.

Dirty Everyday Slang). Dirty French: Everyday Slang from What’s Up? to F % Off! (Dirty Everyday Slang). 31 MB·829 Downloads·New! formality and bust out with expressions they never teach you in school, including:,Cool slang,Funny insults. Dirty Chinese: Everyday Slang from What's Up? to F % Off! (Dirty Everyday Slang). 5 MB·752 Downloads·New!. Nothing is censored in Dirty Chinese.

Dirty Japanese: Everyday Slang from (Dirty Everyday Slang).

Dirty German Everyday Slang. Dirty German Everyday Slang. German, Deutsch, Slang, Dictionary.

GET D!RTYNext time you’re traveling or just chattin’ in German with your friends, drop the textbook formality and bust out with expressions they never teach you in school, including:,Cool slang,Funny insults,Explicit sex terms,Raw swear wordsDirty German teaches the casual expressions heard every day on the streets of Germany:,What's up?Wie geht's?,I'm.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Dirty German: Everyday Slang from (Dirty Everyday Slang) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Dirty German teaches the casual expressions heard every day on the streets of Germany:,What's up? . Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/Dirty German: Everyday Slang from (Dirty Everyday Slang).

Dirty German teaches the casual expressions heard every day on the streets of Germany:,What's up? Wie geht's?,I'm smashed. Ich bin total angeschickert.

Dirty Tagalog: Everyday Slang from "What's Up?" to "F % Off!"

Dirty Tagalog: Everyday Slang from "What's Up?" to "F % Off!" Ben Ignacio. Dirty Greek: Everyday Slang from "What's Up?" to "F % Off!" Cristos Samaras. Dirty Polish: Everyday Slang from "What's Up?" to "F % Off!" Jan Wojtyla Van Haas. Dirty Dutch: Everyday Slang from "What's Up?" to "F % Off!"

Cool slang? Funny insults? Explicit sex terms? Raw swear words Dirty Russian teaches the casual expressions heard every day on the streets of Russia:What's up?kak de-LA?I really gotta piss. mnye O-chen NA-do pos-SAT.

Cool slang? Funny insults? Explicit sex terms? Raw swear words Dirty Russian teaches the casual expressions heard every day on the streets of Russia:What's up?kak de-LA?I really gotta piss. Damn, you fine!blin, nu ti i shi-KAR-nii! Let's have an orgy. da-VAI u-STRO-im OR-gi-yu. Next time you're traveling or just chattin' in Russia with your friends, drop the textbook formality and bust out with expressions they never teach you in school, including: ? Cool slang ? Funny insults ? Explicit sex terms ? Raw swear words. Dirty Russian teaches the casual expressions heard every day on the streets of Russia: What's up? kak de-LA?

Dirty French: Everyday Slang from (Dirty Everyday Slang), a book by. .What others are saying.

Dirty French: Everyday Slang from (Dirty Everyday Slang), a book by Adrien Clautrier, Henry Rowe. Dirty German, I had fun reading it at BN. Funny German Swearing Book at The Onion Store. Cagnina Haynes sounds like something you need for when you finally make that trip to Oktober Fest.

GET D!RTYNext time you’re traveling or just chattin’ in German with your friends, drop the textbook formality and bust out with expressions they never teach you in school, including:•Cool slang•Funny insults•Explicit sex terms•Raw swear wordsDirty German teaches the casual expressions heard every day on the streets of Germany:•What's up?Wie geht's? •I'm smashed.Ich bin total angeschickert. •Fuckin' Munich fans.Scheiß München Fans. •That shit reeks.Das riecht aber übel. •I wanna shag ass.Ich will abhauen. •What a complete asshole.Was für ein Arschloch. •Dude, you're built like Arnold!Mensch, du bist der Arnie!
  • I am German, (and moreover 40+). As we Germans take everything very serious, here is my philological review of this important book:

    Being a German (did I mention that already?) I can recommend this book without concerns to Germans to learn "Dirty (American at least) English" - seriously !
    The other way round it is more tricky. You will learn much about German language without doubt, but many of the used phrases are not 100% correct or not really common or are out of a certain joke and what is meant, could be understood only, if the person knows that joke or you tell him/here the joke before..

    Some examples:

    "Schnitzelkind" cannot be commonly understood, you need to know the mentioned joke/explanation before.

    Of course many words and phrases fit well, and are commonly known, for example "Grufti", "dicke Freunde", "quatschen", "Das ist g#il."

    "K#ckvogel" can be good understood as an insult but is not a common word, it's more a word creation.

    "Eiweisstorsten" for a man having muscles, is difficult to understand and not at all a common word.

    "Tussistempel" for a common tattoo which girls are used to have at the back at a certain place, is a wrong word nearly nobody would understand- "#rschgeweih" is the correct one for that.

    "Hol mir mal ne Flasche Bier" is not a question, but an order.

    "srz" as a German phrase used in a chat as a replacement for the English "sry" (sorry), was new to me. It may be a good joke in the hacker community knowing details about German keyboards, but it is surely not commonly understood. I laughed after understanding it (after 12 minutes and 8 s or so), but others may not get it at all... ;-)

    And so on...

    The author is far from native tongue (as my English here, srz for that).

    At the best pages, there is even cultural critizism in place ("We have been having ##x for weeks now, don't you think we should use 'Du' ").

    So, you learn much about German, but if you want to use one of the phrases, I recommend asking a native German speaker before. Or at least google the word.

    But, maybe, if you want to get in contact with a German girl, it is more "charming" ('Ist der süüüß!') to talk slightly broken German ? Dunno. Then this book is perfect. But don't ask her, if her t#ts were a birthday present. That advice from my side... ;-)

  • First off, let me say this book is very dirty in language...Something I don't recommend to minors, unless you are the type to allow them to learn such words and teach them to use them in the right situation.

    It covers basic informal and colloquial speech and progresses into dirty language such as "fighting words" (words that are prelude to fisticuffs), sexual terms (such as body parts, acts and paraphernalia) and even just plain insults for the sake of mean.

    If you make a close-enough friend in Germany, be prepared to understand the double-entendre-loaded slang that comes with such closeness.

    I recommend this to any linguist with a penchant for vulgarity and those who want to be aware when visiting Germany.

    Besides, my uncle, who learns German, could do with a refresher course since the Berlin Wall fell.

  • LIke the Japanese version, this starts out with some comments about culture, manners and courtesy. How to address someone you don't know what not to ask, etc... Then it gets to the 'dirty' words and after that covers various areas like sports, food, dating... So, if you want just the 'dirty' words go elswwhere. It really is worth the price.

  • Love it.

  • Its not a bad book. It seems there could be more detail in it though. Definitely has some words and phrases in it that you couldnt learn anywhere else if studying.

  • This book goes beyond the dirty words. The phrases used in casual conversation are very helpful to learn. The language learning tools out there focus mainly on the very basics of the language. You learn how to order a meal, say please and thank you, etc. But if you want to know how to talk in "real life", like to strangers on the train, or while having a glass of wine, this book is much more helpful than the formal training I have used!

  • good content if you are looking for the real German language

  • It is a sign of my weakness that I would like to be able to swear in German. This book covers it pretty well. In any language sometimes nothing but a swear word will do to make your feeling known.