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ePub Who Abolished Slavery?: Slave Revolts and Abolitionism&lt;br /&gt;A Debate with Jo&Atilde;&pound;o Pedro Marques (European Expansion Global Interaction) download

by Seymour Drescher,Pieter C. Emmer,João Pedro Marques

ePub Who Abolished Slavery?: Slave Revolts and Abolitionism&lt;br /&gt;A Debate with Jo&Atilde;&pound;o Pedro Marques (European Expansion  Global Interaction) download
Author:
Seymour Drescher,Pieter C. Emmer,João Pedro Marques
ISBN13:
978-1845456368
ISBN:
184545636X
Language:
Publisher:
Berghahn Books; 1 edition (October 30, 2014)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
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1225 kb
Fb2 file:
1925 kb
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4.9
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194

Who Abolished Slavery?. The past half-century has produced a mass of information regarding slave resistance, ranging from individual acts of disobedience to massive uprisings. Drescher, Seymour, Emmer, Pieter C. ISBN-13.

Who Abolished Slavery?. Many of these acts of rebellion have been studied extensively, yet the ultimate goals of the insurgents. European Expansion and Global Interaction.

Introduction: Slave Revolts and the Abolition of Slavery: An Overinterpretation João Pedro Marques.

He obtained a PhD in History from the Universidade Nova de Lisboa, where he taught African History. He has published dozens of articles and several books on the subjects of slavery, abolition and other colonial issues, including The Sounds of Silence (Berghahn Books, 2006). Introduction: Slave Revolts and the Abolition of Slavery: An Overinterpretation João Pedro Marques. PART II. Chapter 1. Africa and Abolitionism John Thornton.

Start by marking Who Abolished Slavery? Slave Revolts and Abolitionism as Want to Read . A debate with João Pedro Marques, 2010). Books by João Pedro Marques.

Start by marking Who Abolished Slavery? Slave Revolts and Abolitionism as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

1 - Genovese, Eugene . From Rebellion to Revolution: Afro-American Slave Revolts in the Making of the Modern World, Baton-Rouge, Louisiana State University Press, 1979. Recommend this journal.

Slave Revolts and Abolitionism. A Debate with João Pedro Marques (Berghahn Books, 2010), which is shortly to be published-will contribute towards enriching the ways in which the convoluted Portuguese abolitionist trajectories are assessed and revealed to an international historiography. 7, number 2, Winter 200 e-JPH, Vol. 7, number 2, Winter 2009.

Abolitionism: A Debate with João Pedro Marques. In Seymour Drescher & Pieter C. Emmer (ed., Who Abolished Slavery? Slave Revolts and Abolitionism: A Debate with João Pedro Marques. New York: Berghahn Books, pp. 132-140. Rights, Resistance, and Emancipation.

Britain abolished slavery throughout its empire by the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 . Main articles: Abolitionism in the United Kingdom and Slavery in the British Isles.

Britain abolished slavery throughout its empire by the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 (with the notable exception of India), the French colonies re-abolished it in 1848 and the . abolished slavery in 1865 with the 13th Amendment to the . The slave revolt, in the largest Caribbean French colony of Saint-Domingue in 1791, was the beginning of what became the Haitian Revolution led by formerly enslaved people like Georges Biassou, Toussaint Louverture, and Jean-Jacques Dessalines.

João Pedro Marques, Seymour Drescher, P. C. Emmer. European expansion & global interaction. 184545636X Previous

João Pedro Marques, Seymour Drescher, P. 184545636X Previous: The British West Indies in the Age of Abolitio.

S. Drescher, ‘Whose Abolition? Popular Pressure and the Ending of the British Slave Trade’, Past and Present, 143 (1994), p. .

CrossRefGoogle Scholar. S. Drescher, ‘Whose Abolition? Popular Pressure and the Ending of the British Slave Trade’, Past and Present, 143 (1994), pp. 136–66. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

The Slavery Abolition Act 1833 (3 & 4 Will. IV c. 73) abolished slavery throughout the British Empire. This Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom expanded the jurisdiction of the Slave Trade Act 1807 which made the purchase or ownership of slaves illegal within the British Empire, with the exception of "the Territories in the Possession of the East India Company", Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), and Saint Helena

The past half-century has produced a mass of information regarding slave resistance, ranging from individual acts of disobedience to massive uprisings. Many of these acts of rebellion have been studied extensively, yet the ultimate goals of the insurgents remain open for discussion. Recently, several historians have suggested that slaves achieved their own freedom by resisting slavery, which counters the predominant argument that abolitionist pressure groups, parliamentarians, and the governmental and anti-governmental armies of the various slaveholding empires were the prime movers behind emancipation. Marques, one of the leading historians of slavery and abolition, argues that, in most cases, it is impossible to establish a direct relation between slaves' uprisings and the emancipation laws that would be approved in the western countries. Following this presentation, his arguments are taken up by a dozen of the most outstanding historians in this field. In a concluding chapter, Marques responds briefly to their comments and evaluates the degree to which they challenge or enhance his view.