mostraligabue
» » A Cultural History of Causality: Science, Murder Novels, and Systems of Thought

ePub A Cultural History of Causality: Science, Murder Novels, and Systems of Thought download

by Stephen Kern

ePub A Cultural History of Causality: Science, Murder Novels, and Systems of Thought download
Author:
Stephen Kern
ISBN13:
978-0691127682
ISBN:
0691127689
Language:
Publisher:
Princeton University Press (August 6, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1198 kb
Fb2 file:
1770 kb
Other formats:
doc lrf mobi doc
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
201

Murder stories, Kern argues, are a sort of cultural repository of thoughts about causality, of how things fit .

Murder stories, Kern argues, are a sort of cultural repository of thoughts about causality, of how things fit together. This book represents a most successful endeavor to write a history of the 'causal' since 1830, one that will certainly take pride of place not only in the literature on crime but also in the modern historiographic literature on how arguments are made and how they are validated over time. -Sander L. Gilman, author of "Making the Body Beautiful.

Home Browse Books Book details, A Cultural History of Causality: Science, Murder. Kern identifies five shifts in thinking about causality, shifts toward increasing specificity, multiplicity, complexity, probability, and uncertainty. A Cultural History of Causality: Science, Murder Novels, and Systems of Thought.

Kern identifies five shifts in thinking about causality, shifts . Stephen Kern is Humanities Distinguished Professor of History at Ohio State University.

Kern identifies five shifts in thinking about causality, shifts toward increasing specificity, multiplicity, complexity, probability, and uncertainty. The book closes by considering the revolutionary impact of quantum theory, which, though it influenced novelists only marginally, shattered the model of causal understanding that had dominated Western thought since the seventeenth century.

A Cultural History of Causality: Science, Murder Novels, and Systems of Thought. Others have addressed changing ideas about causality in specific areas, but no one has tackled a broad cultural history of this concept as does Stephen Kern in this engagingly written and lucidly argued book. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Kern’s history of causality explores not only the major scientific and philosophical ideas of modernity, but a sampling of its literary texts as well: his goal is to integrate a history of science with a history of literature. Gathering the disparate knowledge systems of nearly two centuries into discrete categories, Kern produces a taxonomy of causality that is cogent and convincing.

A Cultural History of Causality book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

A Cultural History of Causality book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Cultural History of Causality: Science, Murder Novels, and Systems of Thought as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The nty dialectic, inspired by quantum physics (359-66), remains unconvincing as a universal organising principle, particularly since both of its key terms take on various meanings in different contexts.

Causality, Stephen Kern concedes, is hard to define and even harder to prove. his book is highly recommended to everyone interested in smart and engaging interdisciplinary scholarship. Murder stories, Kern argues, are a sort of cultural repository of thoughts about causality, of how things fit together.

Kern gives us in this book a brilliant history of modern causality, which he traces in fiction from the linear .

Kern gives us in this book a brilliant history of modern causality, which he traces in fiction from the linear unities of the realist novel through the indirection and uncertainty of modernism. Gilman, author of Making the Body Beautiful. About the Author: Stephen Kern is Humanities Distinguished Professor of History at Ohio State University.

This pioneering work is the first to trace how our understanding of the causes of human behavior has changed radically over the course of European and American cultural history since 1830. Focusing on the act of murder, as documented vividly by more than a hundred novels including Crime and Punishment, An American Tragedy, The Trial, and Lolita, Stephen Kern devotes each chapter of A Cultural History of Causality to examining a specific causal factor or motive for murder--ancestry, childhood, language, sexuality, emotion, mind, society, and ideology. In addition to drawing on particular novels, each chapter considers the sciences (genetics, endocrinology, physiology, neuroscience) and systems of thought (psychoanalysis, linguistics, sociology, forensic psychiatry, and existential philosophy) most germane to each causal factor or motive.

Kern identifies five shifts in thinking about causality, shifts toward increasing specificity, multiplicity, complexity, probability, and uncertainty. He argues that the more researchers learned about the causes of human behavior, the more they realized how much more there was to know and how little they knew about what they thought they knew. The book closes by considering the revolutionary impact of quantum theory, which, though it influenced novelists only marginally, shattered the model of causal understanding that had dominated Western thought since the seventeenth century.

Others have addressed changing ideas about causality in specific areas, but no one has tackled a broad cultural history of this concept as does Stephen Kern in this engagingly written and lucidly argued book.