mostraligabue
» » 69 A.D.: The Year of Four Emperors

ePub 69 A.D.: The Year of Four Emperors download

by Gwyn Morgan

ePub 69 A.D.: The Year of Four Emperors download
Author:
Gwyn Morgan
ISBN13:
978-0195315899
ISBN:
0195315898
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 2, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1209 kb
Fb2 file:
1202 kb
Other formats:
txt lrf lit mbr
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
880

In 69 AD, Gwyn Morgan offers a fresh look at this period, based on two considerations to which insufficient attention has been paid in the past.

In 69 AD, Gwyn Morgan offers a fresh look at this period, based on two considerations to which insufficient attention has been paid in the past. And second, that the role of the armies, as distinct from that of their commanders, has too often been exaggerated

The Year of the Four Emperors is the label we attach to the 18-month period that opened with the suicide of Nero in June 68 and closed with the triumph of Vespasian in. .Other author's books: 69 AD: The Year of Four Emperors. 69 AD: The Year of Four Emperors.

The Year of the Four Emperors is the label we attach to the 18-month period that opened with the suicide of Nero in June 68 and closed with the triumph of Vespasian in December 69. In the interim three other emperors held power, if only for a few months.

The year of the four emperors is, as a historical event, confusing for many interested in early Roman imperial history. However Gwyn Morgan successfully captures the events of Imperial Romes first civil war in vivid detail, drawing together all the sources for the period, analyzing them thoroughly and providing a sound argument for the course of events

In "69 AD: The Year of Four Emperors," Gwyn Morgan offers a fascinating look at the political upheavals of that important year in Roman history

In "69 AD: The Year of Four Emperors," Gwyn Morgan offers a fascinating look at the political upheavals of that important year in Roman history. Morgan takes the readers through the fall of Nero, Galba's rise and fall, Otho's turn at the throne, the strange tenure of Vitellius and, finally, the victory of Vespasian and the establishment of the Flavian dynasty. None of these leaders come off unscathed and some of them are portrayed in a very dark light. Morgan also looks at the leading historians-Tacictus, Suetonius, Cassius Dio, Plutarch-of the ancient world and how they.

In69 AD, Gwyn Morgan offers a fresh look at this period, based on two considerations to which insufficient . In the interim three other emperors held power, if only for a few months

In69 AD, Gwyn Morgan offers a fresh look at this period, based on two considerations to which insufficient attention has been paid in the past. And second, that the role of the armies, as distinct from that of their commanders, has too often been exaggerated. There was Galba, officially declared emperor in June 68 and assassinated on 15 January 69. There was Otho, the man responsible for his murder.

Galba, Servius Sulpicius, Emperor of Rome, 3 . 69 ., Otho, Marcus Salvius, Emperor of Rome, 32-69, Vitellius, Aulus, Emperor of Rome, 15-69, Vespasian, Emperor of Rome, 9-79. New York : Oxford University Press.

Not surprisingly, since it is based on a careful reconsideration of all the sources, while it will provide enjoyment for many, it will also prove controversial in some quarters. -Leslie Murison, author of Galba, Otho and Vitellius: Careers and Controversies.

In 69 AD, Gwyn Morgan offers a fresh look at this period, based on two considerations.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. The Year of Four Emperors, so the ancient sources assure us, was one of the most chaotic, violent and frightening periods in all Roman history: a time of assassinations and civil wars, of armies so out of control. The Year of Four Emperors, so the ancient sources assure us, was one of the most chaotic, violent and frightening periods in all Roman history: a time of assassinations and civil wars, of armies so out of control that they had no qualms about occupying the city of Rome, and of ambitious men who seized power only to lose it, one after another. In 69 AD, Gwyn Morgan offers a fresh look at this period, based on two considerations to which insufficient attention has been paid in the past.

In 69 AD, Gwyn Morgan offers a look at this period, based on two considerations to which insufficient attention has . In between, three other emperors hold power.

In 69 AD, Gwyn Morgan offers a look at this period, based on two considerations to which insufficient attention has been paid in the past. We meet Galba, old, tightfisted and conservative, who was declared emperor in June 68 and assassinated in January 69.

The Year of Four Emperors, so the ancient sources assure us, was one of the most chaotic, violent, and frightening periods in all Roman history. It was a time of assassinations and civil war, of armies so out of control that they had no qualms about occupying the city of Rome, and of ambitious men who ruthlessly seized power only to have it wrenched from their grasps. In 69 AD, Gwyn Morgan offers a fresh look at this period, based on two considerations to which insufficient attention has been paid in the past. First, that we need to unravel rather than cherry-pick between the conflicting accounts of Tacitus, Plutarch and Suetonius, our three main sources of information. And second, that the role of the armies, as distinct from that of their commanders, has too often been exaggerated. The result is a remarkably accurate and insightful narrative history, filled with colorful portraits of the leading participants and new insights into the nature of the Roman military. A strikingly vivid account of ancient Rome, 69 AD is an original and compelling account of one of the best known but perhaps least understood periods in all Roman history. It will engage and enlighten all readers with a love for the tumultuous soap opera that was Roman political life.
  • For many of us without a specialized background in history, the Roman empire is characterized by a reasonably orderly succession of Emperors who ruled as unchallenged sovereigns with the exception of some localized revolts. However, as Gwyn Morgan shows, the frenzied and somewhat farcical events of the Year of the Four Emperors belie that belief. Indeed, to see the empire reduced to power plays between competing factions shatters the illusion of the orderly state that Rome is usually conceived to be. Making deft use of sources like Tacitus, Plutarch, Seutonius among others, the author examines the frenzied 18 month or so period when 4 pretenders laid claim over the legacy of the Roman principate subsequent to the eradication of the Julio-Claudian line with the suicide of Nero. The traditional discourse sees the ensuing tumult of the empire as a consequence of indisciplined rank and file soldiers running amok - but Professor Morgan challenges this simplistic assumption. He shows that the various grabs for power were originated by powerful military officers who wished to either play king or kingmakers for their own narrow and vested interests. Soldiers of many legions did openly challenge and rebel against their officers but the author makes a compelling case that this was done only when they didn't respect the person leading them. An interesting fact about this sequence of emperors is perhaps that none of them made a grab for power independently, they were usually goaded by someone else who wished to rally the troops around a figurehead and use proximity to power to line their own pockets with money and power. So it was, that the circus kicked off with Galba, who was asked to lead the rebellion against Nero by Julius Vindex and was carried to power by the machinations of Nymphidius Sabinus who led the praetorian guard to rebel by promising them monetary benefits when Galba became emperor. When Galba refused to buy the affections of the men with money, the guard dumped him for Otho, who had initially toadied to Galba and rebelled when he did not adopt him as his successor. And then, there is the curious case of the glutton Vitellius - the legate of the troops in Germany who was proclaimed emperor by the German legions under his command upon the encouragement of two venal men called Caecina and Valens. Perhaps, the only person to retain some dignity at this time was the last of the four, Vespasian, whose revolt against Vitellius was driven more by a sense of self preservation than a power grab since he was an appointee of Nero and he could anticipate a Vitellian purge would put the neck of the favourites of the old regime on the chopping block.
    During the course of the journey, we meet numerous dishonourable men, scycophants and soothsayers who sometimes end up having a greater impact on history than their lowly stations in life would otherwise entail. The author keeps a gripping pace and the book unfolds like a thriller rather than a boring tome and is a good read for anyone looking to go deep in a most curious phase of the Roman empire

  • An outstanding account of a fascinating year in Roman history, Morgan does a fine job retelling events. I did find this one a bit dense, and it took me a good deal longer than a book of this size usually would. Morgan spent a bit more time than I would like debating the merits of the various accounts we have of events from Roman historians, but I suppose that's to be expected when you're dealing with primarily three sources which sometimes conflict with each other.

  • In "69 AD: The Year of Four Emperors," Gwyn Morgan offers a fascinating look at the political upheavals of that important year in Roman history. Morgan takes the readers through the fall of Nero, Galba's rise and fall, Otho's turn at the throne, the strange tenure of Vitellius and, finally, the victory of Vespasian and the establishment of the Flavian dynasty. None of these leaders come off unscathed and some of them are portrayed in a very dark light. Morgan also looks at the leading historians--Tacictus, Suetonius, Cassius Dio, Plutarch--of the ancient world and how they viewed the procession of emperors.

    Morgan offers a look at the political, economic and cultural implications of this chaotic year and--when needed--takes the action off of the Roman stage to highlight other territories. This is excellent but more maps could have been included to help the reader along. Readers who are looking for an account of battles and troop positions will be disappointed--but Morgan is not offering a military history (indeed, civil wars and revolutions can never be understood in only military terms).

    While scholarly, Morgan does not write just for scholars. Readers who want to know more about this important year and those with Roman interests will profit from reading this enjoyable and instructive book.

  • 69 A.D. is a narrative of violent deeds -- murders, betrayals, warfare, decadence, all the stuff of the Roman Empire on the silver screen -- as the suicide of Nero was followed by the rise and fall of three remarkably unattractive Emperors, Galba, Otho, and Vitellius, all in the space of less than a year. The narrative concludes with the advent of Vespasian, essentially the second founder of imperial stability. If you are reading this book for gory diversion, however, you will be mildly disappointed. Gwyn Morgan is not a breath-taking stylist but rather an earnest academic historian. The real interest in this book is historiographical, that is, the important question of what uses to make of historical sources, especially synchronic literary accounts of events, and how to confirm or contradict such sources. In this case, the chief source is the Roman historian Tacitus; 69 A.D. is centrally a study of the reliability of Tacitus for understanding events that shaped the whole future of the Roman Empire and thus the modern world. A serious book for serious thinkers about history!

  • This book documents the tumultuous period 69 AD after the assassination of the emperor Nero, and the struggle for the "throne" of the Roman empire. The author is very thorough and cites many sources, particularly Tacitus, but also points out where they diverge.
    An interesting story of personalities, intrigue, not to mention violence. A bit long winded at times, this is still a very good read, especially for the 'Roman reader".