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ePub Reasons and Persons download

by Derek Parfit

ePub Reasons and Persons download
Author:
Derek Parfit
ISBN13:
978-0198249085
ISBN:
019824908X
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (February 20, 1986)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1499 kb
Fb2 file:
1701 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
507

Clarendon press · oxford. Includes bibliographical references and index. Many introductions to books of this kind try to explain the central concepts that are used.

Clarendon press · oxford.

Just finished reading Reasons and Persons by Derek Parfit, a British moral philosopher who passed away on January 1, 2017. It’s been a while since I enjoyed reading a philosophy book so much! It almost feels like the author was some superhuman, Buddha-like impersonal being

Just finished reading Reasons and Persons by Derek Parfit, a British moral philosopher who passed away on January 1, 2017. It’s been a while since I enjoyed reading a philosophy book so much! It almost feels like the author was some superhuman, Buddha-like impersonal being.

Reasons and Persons is a 1984 book by the philosopher Derek Parfit, in which the author discusses ethics, rationality and personal identity. It is divided into four parts, dedicated to self-defeating theories, rationality and time, personal identity. It is divided into four parts, dedicated to self-defeating theories, rationality and time, personal identity and responsibility toward future generations. Part 1 argues that certain ethical theories are self-defeating.

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The first part of the book is a technical dissection of the ethical behavior theories of self interest and collective utility.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Derek Parfit (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0198249085. The first part of the book is a technical dissection of the ethical behavior theories of self interest and collective utility. It ties together with the rest of the book, but if that is not your bag I think you can pretty safely skip it. One stand out, for me, was the thorough destruction of theories of the Cartesian ego.

Derek Antony Parfit was born in Chengdu, China on December 11, 1942 to parents who were doctors teaching preventive . He wrote several books during his lifetime including Reasons and Persons and On What Matters.

Derek Antony Parfit was born in Chengdu, China on December 11, 1942 to parents who were doctors teaching preventive medicine at Christian missions. He received a degree in modern history in 1964 from Balliol College, Oxford. While on a Harkness Fellowship at Harvard University and Columbia University after graduation, he began attending lectures on philosophy and changed course. In 2014, he was awarded the Rolf Schock Prize by the Royal Swedish Academy. He died on January 2, 2017 at the age of 74. Библиографические данные.

Clarendon Press, 1984 - 543 pagine. Challenging, with several powerful arguments, some of our deepest beliefs about rationality, morality, and personal identity, Derek Parfit claims that we have a false view about our own nature. It is often rational to act against our own best interests, he argues, and most of us have moral views that are self-defeating.

Challenging, with several powerful arguments, some of our deepest beliefs about rationality, morality, and personal identity, Derek Parfit claims that we have a false view about our own nature.

Challenging, with several powerful arguments, some of our deepest beliefs about rationality, morality, and personal identity, Derek Parfit claims that we have a false view about our own nature. It is often rational to act against our own best interests, he argues, and most of us have moral views that are self-defeating. We often act wrongly, although we know there will be no one with serious grounds for complaint, and when we consider future generations it is very hard to avoid conclusions that most of us will find very disturbing.
  • I got this book hoping for insights on temporal metaphysics and found a cornucopia of ideas, analyses, and gedankenexperiments on the nature of personhood. The moral calculus of time and self is neatly laid out for exploration (do you have obligations to your past self?) A class of problems is deeply probed: whether and how you evaluate the moral desert of *possible* future people (do you do someone a favor by causing them to exist?)

    The first part of the book is a technical dissection of the ethical behavior theories of self interest and collective utility. It ties together with the rest of the book, but if that is not your bag I think you can pretty safely skip it.

    One stand out, for me, was the thorough destruction of theories of the Cartesian ego. It opened my eyes to the problems that idea has caused throughout history. (That is my realization, it is not in the book.)

    It did not seem long. An excellent read overall.

    The Kindle edition has about 10 typos, but in addition there is a fairly confusing typographical error in one of the appendices: a capital T is used instead of I in single quotes ('I'). Now you are warned, all of you who read 6 or 7 appendices in philosophy books. :)

  • This book is a must have, extremely thorough arguments that can be hard to follow but well worth it once you put in the effort.

  • When I first read this book on a trip across Europe, I was blown away: I remember thinking again and again "How can something this blow-the-roof-off important be published so late in the game?" Parfit shows how some of our most common-sensical beliefs about self-interest, ethics, personal identity, and (perhaps most interestingly) our obligations to future generations are beset with surprising and thorny problems, or even flatly self-contradictory or incoherent. He's also the master of the subtle-but-important distinction. Probably several longish books could be spun out from all the original material in Reasons and Persons-- certainly many journal articles already have been! However: while Parfit's style is very clear, and he doesn't refer as extensively as some philosophers to the work of previous authors, I probably wouldn't want to tackle this bad boy without at least some training in philosophy.

  • A rigorously argued work of genius as it has proven to be in the philosophic community. Clearly, this is a book that is a fundamental read for students at the undergraduate and graduate level in all disciplines.

  • good and fast

  • I'm only a few pages in, but if you're a transhumanist, you need this book. If you sit around and wonder about self, what would happen if you joined with another self, or separated out parts of your brain into two separate people, or if you ever wonder why 1 single person is considered an organism, but not 2 people together, then this book is for you. Why does wrong against me count more to me than wrong against you? How should we generalize about self?

  • Very rich discussion of fascinating thought experiments.

    One of the most interesting studies in the theory of rational choice and of the theory of personal identity AND the relations between the two..

  • This was the first time I read such a dense philosophical book. Parfit is pretty good at producing reasoning and examples for his causes but there are some serious counterexamples to many of his claims. Good read though,