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ePub 24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep download

by Jonathan Crary

ePub 24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep download
Author:
Jonathan Crary
ISBN13:
978-1781680933
ISBN:
1781680930
Language:
Publisher:
Verso; 1 edition (June 4, 2013)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1261 kb
Fb2 file:
1146 kb
Other formats:
docx mobi mbr azw
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
970

This masterful book provides uniquely compelling insights into our postmodern condition including the possibility of change

The workers in the mills were organised into two 12‑hour shifts. The mills never stopped. Crary is a professor of modern art and theory, so you are going to have to brace yourself for a certain amount of rhetoric: the round-the-clock world's "peremptory reductiveness celebrates a hallucination of presence, of an unalterable permanence composed of incessant, frictionless operations" etc. The usual suspects – Deleuze and Guattari, Walter Benjamin, Foucault – crop up regularly.

The marketplace now operates through every hour of the clock, pushing us into constant activity and eroding forms of community and political expression, damaging the fabric of everyday life.

Jonathan Crary examines how this interminable non-time blurs any separation between an intensified, ubiquitous .

Jonathan Crary examines how this interminable non-time blurs any separation between an intensified, ubiquitous consumerism and emerging strategies of control and surveillance. He describes the ongoing management of individual attentiveness and the impairment of perception within the compulsory routines of contemporary technological culture.

That is the argument of Jonathan Crary’s provocative and fascinating essay, which takes 24/7 as a spectral umbrella term for round-the-clock consumption and production in today’s world. The human power nap is a macho response to what Crary notes is the alarming shrinkage of sleep in modernity

Crary’s denunciation of the 24/7 world’s saturation in web-enabled media results in some splendid formulations . At the end of the book, Crary waxes poetic about this and laments that few people these days besides New Agers are interested in their dreams.

Crary’s denunciation of the 24/7 world’s saturation in web-enabled media results in some splendid formulations – such as when he argues that activists who organise on the internet voluntarily kettle themselves in cyberspace, where state surveillance, sabotage and manipulation are far easier than in lived communities. Crary complains that films such as The Matrix portray societies of sleepers as inert and duped and so work as propaganda for 24/7.

Sleep, he claims, in its profound uselessness and intrinsic passivity. will always collide with the demands of a 24/7 universe. Sleep is unprofitable, an embarrassing defect to the temporalities of a round-the-clock labor system, an incongruous anomaly and site of crisis in the global present. The stunning, inconceivable reality, declares Crary, is that nothing of value can be extracted from.

Jonathan Crary examines how this interminable non-time blurs any separation between an intensified .

24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep explores some of the ruinous consequences of the expanding non-stop processes of twenty-first-century capitalism. The marketplace now operates through every hour of the clock, pushing us into constant activity and eroding forms of community and political expression, damaging the fabric of everyday life.Jonathan Crary examines how this interminable non-time blurs any separation between an intensified, ubiquitous consumerism and emerging strategies of control and surveillance. He describes the ongoing management of individual attentiveness and the impairment of perception within the compulsory routines of contemporary technological culture. At the same time, he shows that human sleep, as a restorative withdrawal that is intrinsically incompatible with 24/7 capitalism, points to other more formidable and collective refusals of world-destroying patterns of growth and accumulation.
  • "24/7" by Jonathan Crary is a brilliant interdisciplinary analysis about capital's ongoing colonization of human consciousness. Professor Crary is a highly regarded art critic, essayist and editor whose studies about perception and power have proven widely influential. This masterful book provides uniquely compelling insights into our postmodern condition including the possibility of change.

    Dr. Crary frames the discussion with the tale of DARPA's quest to engineer a `sleepless soldier' who might better fit into the military's increasingly automated systems of terror, torture and surveillance. The author supposes that these kind of non-sleep technologies will inevitably be adapted by struggling civilian workers and consumers, many of whom are in fact already compelled to develop virtual identities in order to better compete in the cutthroat 24/7 marketplace. The author thoughtfully compares capital's attack on sleep with the broader assault on the earth's resources and the theft of community assets; with the infamous Bhopal disaster serving as an extreme example of the discord that exists between corporate violence and communities at sleep.

    Dr. Crary deftly assimilates the thoughts of leading postmodern theorists including Foucault, Agamben, Bauman, Deleuze and others to develop, enrich and articulate his ideas. For example, Dr. Crary argues that the so-called `digital age' is properly understood as capitalism's ongoing project of subsuming individuals within its regime of discipline and control. As individuals depoliticize themselves through their willing submission to screen capture defined by the perquisites of capital, the author suggests that the widespread dissemination of software tools to capture the experiences of end users has falsely substituted for the democratic ideal of human progress.

    Drawing from works of art, film and literature to inform his narrative, Dr. Crary discusses how the 'attention economy' has intended to make democracy safe for capitalism. The author explains how 1950s television culture had imposed a regime of habituation and normalcy in the aftermath of a horrific World War, substituting individual dream fulfillment with the desire of mass consumption. The rise of the Internet has only further atomized individuals into their screen lives; thus seeming to have all but obliterated the latent threat of 1960s communal idealism from our memory. Warning against the seductive idea that social media can induce change without a commensurate movement on the streets, Dr. Crary nonetheless still holds out hope that people can harness the power of their dream-sleep to imagine a better world that is free from the privations of billionaires, big corporations and crony politicians.

    I highly recommend this exceptional and deeply thought-provoking book to everyone.

  • It's a rant, yes, and it's about how bad things have developed with the late capitalism and especially the influence of the web on our daily life, but it's clever and profound. Crary has a beautiful way of putting an argument together and the last resort being sleep is not the most easy to defend, but he does it. It's a fast, easy read.

  • Capitalism is taking our sleeping time away – for competitive productivity the best worker is a robot, which works day and night. Humans are to be substituted by machines, which don’t claim citizen rights. Now this intent is growing in the space of material, mental work, using automation algorithms and devices. Capitalism always as reduced human physical energy to commodity, but now it wants to colonize mental energy.

  • Crary writes like an artist, and though he circumnavigates his ideas a fair amount, he does it articulately and in such a short book that you hardly notice. I ended up highlighting a lot of his pithy phrasings.

  • Some nice observations but a bit too long. The end is really disappointing with an unrealistic optimism and utopias.

  • A relatively brief but really fine review of the current techno-pickle we're all in. Every sentence is great and sums up material from many other recent studies. Totally worth it, and it actually covers much more territory than you might think -- the whole thing with sleep is his Ariadne's thread or refrain that he follows to better guide us through the labyrinth we find ourselves in. This is a great use of your limited reading time.

  • Great book! Must read no matter you political views.

  • The author takes an interesting approach to contemporary capitalism in this book.
    While the analysis of work blurring the line of leisure and invading our personal life, Crary's analysis go beyond this.
    His argument is that contemporary technology, specially those related to the internet, have created the conditions for action at all times of the day.
    The idea of "the city that never sleeps" has expanded into a sedentary form. Whereas the phrase used to mean one can go out and still find something to do at all times, nowadays everything is accessible at all times from a computer or smartphone screen.
    Therefore, Crary is not only saying we are working more and more, but that even when we are not working, we are demanding work, in a perpetual 24/7 cycle.
    The consequence is the end not only of sleep, but of deep thinking, creativity, imagination, and so on. A powerful argument to be found in this book, and Crary develops it well.
    Definitely recommended.