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ePub Environment and Society in Roman North Africa: Studies in History and Archaeology (Variorum Collected Studies) download

by Brent D. Shaw

ePub Environment and Society in Roman North Africa: Studies in History and Archaeology (Variorum Collected Studies) download
Author:
Brent D. Shaw
ISBN13:
978-0860784791
ISBN:
0860784797
Language:
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (February 28, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1639 kb
Fb2 file:
1966 kb
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Rating:
4.2
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246

Studies in History and Archaeology, by Brent D. Shaw. Source: Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 20, No. 4 (Oc. 1978), pp. 626-629.

Studies in History and Archaeology, by Brent D. Groundwater ecohydrology studies in Africa, Europe and North America. Al Qaeda in North Africa - Global Security Studies. Megaloblastic anemia in North Africa. French Urbanism in North Africa.

Start by marking Environment And Society In Roman North Africa as Want to Read . The impact of a changing environment on human society and, conversely, the impact of man's activities upon the environment are important and contentious subjects today

Start by marking Environment And Society In Roman North Africa as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The impact of a changing environment on human society and, conversely, the impact of man's activities upon the environment are important and contentious subjects today. One such case is that of the decline of Roman North Africa and its conquest by the Arabs.

Each title in the Variorum Collected Studies series brings together for the first time a selection of articles by a leading authority on a particular subject. These studies are reprinted from a vast range of learned journals, Festschrifts and conference proceedings

Each title in the Variorum Collected Studies series brings together for the first time a selection of articles by a leading authority on a particular subject. These studies are reprinted from a vast range of learned journals, Festschrifts and conference proceedings. With a new introduction and index, and often with new notes and previously unpublished material, they constitute an essential resource.

Personal Name: Shaw, Brent . Collected studies series ; CS479.

Personal Name: Shaw, Brent D. Publication, Distribution, et. Aldershot. Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : il. maps ;, 23 cm. Series Statement: Collected studies series ; CS479. General Note: Collection of previously published articles. Download book Environment and society in Roman North Africa : studies in history and archaeology, Brent D.

Environment and Society in Roman North Africa: Studies in History and Archaeology.

Environment and Society in Roman North Africa: Studies in History and Archaeology, by Brent D. Collected Studies Series; Aldershot: Variorum, 1995.

Shaw, Brent (2003), "Climate, Environment, and History: the Case of Roman North Africa", in Wigley, . Ingram, . Farmer, . Climate and History: Studies in Past Climates and their Impact on Man, Cambridge University Press, pp. 379–403

Shaw, Brent (2003), "Climate, Environment, and History: the Case of Roman North Africa", in Wigley, . 379–403.

The impact of a changing environment on human society and, conversely, the impact of man’s activities upon the environment are important and contentious subjects today. December 1997 · Journal of Political Ecology. December 2007 In book: Cultural Survey of Bangladesh Series-2. ARCHITECTURE: A History through the Ages,Chapter: Churches in Church in Bangladesh, chapter . 4Publisher: publication of Asiatic.

The impact of a changing environment on human society and, conversely, the impact of man’s activities upon the environment are important and contentious subjects today. Climatic and environmental change have also been credited with bringing about major shifts in human history. One such case is that of the decline of Roman North Africa and its conquest by the Arabs. The evidence for this process is, however, far from clear-cut, and Professor Shaw’s concern in these studies is firstly to re-examine what is known, from both archaeological and written sources, and how it has been interpreted, work which has led to some substantial revisions of accepted accounts. In the final three articles he turns to analyse how Roman society functioned on the edge of the desert and, in particular, to investigate the careful exploitation and control of critical water resources.