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by Jonathan Crush

ePub The Struggle for Swazi Labour, 1890-1920 download
Author:
Jonathan Crush
ISBN13:
978-0773505698
ISBN:
0773505695
Language:
Publisher:
McGill-Queen's University Press; 1st Edition edition (November 1, 1987)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1469 kb
Fb2 file:
1655 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
726

Jonathan Crush shows that while the Swazi experienced many of the classic problems of underdevelopment, there were also a number of significant differences. The Struggle for Swazi Labour, 1890-1920. 1282850814 (ISBN13: 9781282850811).

Jonathan Crush shows that while the Swazi experienced many of the classic problems of underdevelopment, there were also a number of significant differences. For example, traditional Although the results of colonial expansion have been described in other general studies of the region, this is the first book to take a close look at the case of the Swazi in Swaziland. Jonathan Crush shows that while the Swazi experienced many of the classic problems of underdevelopment, there were also a number of significant differences.

The Struggle for Swazi Labour examines the changing nature of the Swazi migrant labour force, the spatial patterns and temporal rhythms of migration, and the emergence of the Witwatersrand as the dominant, though by n. .

The Struggle for Swazi Labour examines the changing nature of the Swazi migrant labour force, the spatial patterns and temporal rhythms of migration, and the emergence of the Witwatersrand as the dominant, though by no means exclusive, employer of Swazi labour. Although the results of colonial expansion have been described in other general studies of the region, this is the first book to take a close look at the case of the Swazi in Swaziland.

Struggle for Swazi Labour, 1890-1920. Published by: McGill-Queen's University Press. For example, traditional relationships between chiefs and commoners showed much greater resilience than elsewhere. This considerably affected the pace and nature of Swaziland's incorporation into South Africa's notorious migrant labour system.

Crush, . The Struggle for Swazi Labour 1890–1920. McGill-Queen's University Press, Montreal 1987. Crush, . Miles, . You can't say anything to a boer’: Swazi women in South Africa, 1948–1963. In: Crush, . Pirie, . Rogerson, C. (ed., South Africa: Studies in Historical Geography. University of Witwatersrand Press, Johannesburg forthcoming. Davison, . Voices from Mutira: Lives of Rural Gikuyu Women. Lynne Rienner Publishers, London 1989. Lowe, . Social change and ideological struggle over patriarchy in colonial Swaziland.

Crush, The Struggle for Swazi Labour 1890–1920. Kingston & Montreal: McGill-Queens, 1988, 292 p. £3. 0, ISBN 0 5. A. Whiteside (a1).

Indiana University, Bloomington. The Struggle for Swazi Labour, 1890- 1920. The book is divided into three parts. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press. In the first, building on earlier studies by Hilda Kuper and Philip Bonner, Crush examines the social, economic, and political structure of Swazi society on the eve of the imposition of colonial rule and then briefly surveys the growing commoditization evident in Swazi society dur- ing the 1880s and 1890s.

Online shopping for Swaziland - Africa from a great selection at Books Store. As well, because of the country's proximity to a number of alternative labour markets, the Swazi had a greater choice of employment than did many other groups in the region.

The Struggle for Swazi Labour, 1890-1920 by Crush, Jonathan. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used books are out there - we just had to let you know!" See all. About this item. Anonymous Soldiers: The Struggle for Israel, 1917-1947 by Hoffman, Professor Bru. £. 0.

The Struggle for Swazi Labour 1890-1920. Although the struggle with water was omnipresent in this area, it stresses especially the importance of anthropogenic factors in the processes of land reclamation, land loss and land transformation.

Although the results of colonial expansion have been described in other general studies of the region, this is the first book to take a close look at the case of the Swazi in Swaziland. Jonathan Crush shows that while the Swazi experienced many of the classic problems of underdevelopment, there were also a number of significant differences. For example, traditional relationships between chiefs and commoners showed much greater resilience than elsewhere. This considerably affected the pace and nature of Swaziland's incorporation into South Africa's notorious migrant labour system. As well, because of the country's proximity to a number of alternative labour markets, the Swazi had a greater choice of employment than did many other groups in the region. Crush shows how the Swazi were able to use the system to their own advantage and how this helped shape the patterns of early Swazi migrancy. The Struggle for Swazi Labour examines the changing nature of the Swazi migrant labour force, the spatial patterns and temporal rhythms of migration, and the emergence of the Witwatersrand as the dominant, though by no means exclusive, employer of Swazi labour. It also shows how the local history of white settlement and land alienation influenced the manner in which the Swazi were subordinated to foreign economic and political control. The book fills an important gap in the history of Swaziland and in the economic history of the south African region as a whole. It will be helpful to anyone wishing to understand the pre-eminence of traditional personalities and institutions in contemporary Swaziland, and to those seeking an explanation for South African economic domination of the surrounding countries. Its comparative perspective makes it valuable to a wide range of scholars with interests in the social and economic development of southern Africa, as well as to labour and social historians, rural economists, and economic geographers.