mostraligabue
» » They Wrote on Clay: The Babylonian Tablets Speak Today

ePub They Wrote on Clay: The Babylonian Tablets Speak Today download

by Edward Chiera,George G. Cameron

ePub They Wrote on Clay: The Babylonian Tablets Speak Today download
Author:
Edward Chiera,George G. Cameron
ISBN13:
978-0226104256
ISBN:
0226104257
Language:
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press (February 15, 1956)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1110 kb
Fb2 file:
1424 kb
Other formats:
azw mbr docx lit
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
713

Chiera has managed to pack an awful lot into this small book.

235 pp. Chicago and London : The University of Chicago Press, 1964 (1955). Chiera has managed to pack an awful lot into this small book. We learn about the discovery of the ancient cities, the amazing libraries of clay tablets that were unearthed, the exciting story of the decipherment of the complex cuneiform writing system, the worlds of business and religion, of kings, priests, scribes and ordinary folk, and of their multifarious doings, and of much else besides.

They Wrote on Clay book. More remarkable, Chiera had extraordinary gifts to equal to his desire. They Wrote on Clay combines fascinatingly the fruits of sound and painstaking archeology with the natural-born storyteller's art. As transmitted by Chiera, the message of the recently discovered Babylonian clay tablets becomes an absorbing excursion into the common life of a vanished civilization.

Edward Chiera was that most remarkable of men, a. .

More remarkable, Chiera had extraordinary gifts to equal to his desire. They Wrote on Clay combines fascinatingly the fruits of sound and painstaking archeology with the natural-born storyteller’s art. As transmitted by Chiera, the message of the recently discovered Babylonian clay tablets becomes an absorbing exrusion into the common life of a vanished civilization.

Professor Chiera, through his combination of brilliant scholarship and gift of felicitous presentation of his .

Professor Chiera, through his combination of brilliant scholarship and gift of felicitous presentation of his subject, was especially well qualified to achieve this goal. Although, the first draft of this volume was written by Chiera, his untimely death prevented him to realize his dream. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1938, 1966. Pp. xv + 235; frontispiece, 105 illustrations, 1 map.

Edward Chiera, They Wrote on Clay: The Babylonian Tablets Speak Today (Chicago, posthumous publication, 1938). Speiser, "Edward Chiera": Journal of the American Oriental Society, LIII, (1933), pp. 308–309.

Time is running out: please help the Internet Archive today. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. pb. The civilizational achievements of the Sumerians, Babylonians, and Assyrians only started to become known over the course of the last century or so.

They Wrote on Clay They Wrote on Clay combines fascinatingly the fruits of sound and . The book presents, briefly and clearly, a vivid picture of a long-dead people who in numerous ways were very like ourselves. M. Field, New York Times. No mystery story can be as exciting.

item 1 They Wrote on Clay: The Babylonian Tablets Speak Today by Edward Chiera. item 1 They Wrote on Clay: The Babylonian Tablets Speak Today by Edward Chiera. They Wrote on Clay: The Babylonian Tablets Speak Today by Edward Chiera.

They Wrote on Clay: The Babylonian Tablets Speak Today by Edward Chiera, George C. Cameron (p. 46).

Edward Chiera was that most remarkable of men, a competent and respected scholar possessed of an ardent desire to make his research readily and entertainingly available to laymen. More remarkable, Chiera had extraordinary gifts to equal to his desire. They Wrote on Clay combines fascinatingly the fruits of sound and painstaking archeology with the natural-born storyteller's art. As transmitted by Chiera, the message of the recently discovered Babylonian clay tablets becomes an absorbing exrusion into the common life of a vanished civilization. Few will read They Wrote on Clay without becoming infected with something of Chiera's love for the rich archeological lore of the ancient Near East. "The book presents, briefly and clearly, a vivid picture of a long-dead people who in numerous ways were very like ourselves."—L. M. Field, New York Times "No mystery story can be as exciting."—Harper's "Plainly and fetchingly written."—New Republic
  • This book is fascinating because it revealed to me, in a scientific way, the truth about the ancient Babylonians, who were in fact very civilized people. And it made me aware of the lies that were written about them in the past. In particular, calling every horrible sinful place "Babylon" is an insult to humanity itself because Babylonians gave the human kind the basics for everything including writing, language and literature.

  • Straight from the horse's mouth, an experienced thoughtful archeologist who was there to dig up the past.

  • Chiera's breadth of knowledge succeeds in highlighting why it is important to understand that civilization advanced in the region of Persia/Iraq at a time when Greece and Rome were disorganized tribes.
    Chiera has treated many parts of archaeology in a way that is understandable to a student yet still presents tidbits that more recent literature has fails to present. His style is perfect for a broader audience than most academics works and amazingly still not outdated - he presents opinions of the future that are still in progress 70 years after his passing.
    The book is not a good source for quantity of translated inscriptions, but he nails the intricacies of the issues in translation which other presenters of translations do not give enough homage to - many who publish now are pushing their translations and diminishing the idea that even verbatim translations have range of meaning.
    This would be a good text for someone presenting an argument against Greek dominance of historical thought.

  • THEY WROTE ON CLAY : The Babylonian Tablets Speak Today. By Edward Chiera. Edited by George G. Cameron. 235 pp. Chicago and London : The University of Chicago Press, 1964 (1955). (pbk.)
    The civilizational achievements of the Sumerians, Babylonians, and Assyrians only started to become known over the course of the last century or so. For our new understanding of the past we have to thank archaeology, in particular for its discovery of many tens of thousands of baked clay tablets which have miraculously preserved the complex cuneiform writing system, languages, and literatures of the ancient Mesopotamians, and for the patient decipherment of these tablets and other cuneiform-bearing artefacts by a small and dedicated group of international scholars.
    The literature on this subject today is vast, and much of it is accessible only to specialists. Of the studies that are generally available - such as those by A. Leo Oppenheim, Samuel Noah Kramer, and Thorkild Jacobsen - most tend to be aimed at a more scholarly type of audience, the kind of people who like detailed footnotes, precise references to sources, bibliographies, etc., and little seems to be available in the way of a more popular treatment for the general reader.
    This is where the present book comes in. Edward Chiera, though a competent and respected scholar, was exceptional in having an ardent desire to share his knowledge by making the results of his research readily and entertainingly available to the general reader. Consequently, instead of giving us, for example, a lengthy and detailed analysis of the religious ideas or political history of the Babylonians, he has chosen instead to offer an absorbing excursion into the common life of this ancient civilization.
    Chiera's 'They Wrote on Clay' is both well-written and easy to read since the pages are small, the font used is gratifyingly large and readable, and there are numerous black-and-white photographs and line drawings which illustrate various aspects of life in the near East : people, places, animals, domestic scenes, archaeological sites, buildings, artworks and other artefacts etc. These illustrations perfectly supplement Chiera's written account, and although many are contemporary, they do serve to suggest something of what life must have been like in the past.
    Chiera has managed to pack an awful lot into this small book. We learn about the discovery of the ancient cities, the amazing libraries of clay tablets that were unearthed, the exciting story of the decipherment of the complex cuneiform writing system, the worlds of business and religion, of kings, priests, scribes and ordinary folk, and of their multifarious doings, and of much else besides.
    The author clearly loved his subject, and it's invariably from such writers that we get the best books. So if you're looking for a well-written, well-illustrated, easy-to-read popular treatment of this fascinating world, a world that is vastly more important to you than you may realize since it is there and not in Greece that the real roots of Western civilization lie, you'd be hard put to better 'They Wrote on Clay.'
    And if Chiera succeeds in whetting your appetite, as I'm sure he will, you might go on to read one of the best-loved stories to come out of that world, the deeply moving story of the adventures of Gilgamesh, his friendship with the wild man Enkidu, and his search for immortality. I'm pretty sure that, if you don't already know it, you would very much enjoy that too. One good popular edition of this story that can be recommended is:
    THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH : An English Version with an Introduction by N. K. Sandars. Penguin Classics Revised Edition. 128 pp. London : Penguin, 1972 (1964) and Reissued.

  • I found this interesting book to be a very good source of translated inscriptions, some of which found their way into my own recent compilation "Wetlands of Mass Destruction: Ancient Presage for Contemporary Ecocide in Southern Iraq". From all the reference books I consulted for my writing project, this particular one was of a handful of those I found to be most useful in terms of the diversity of material presented.

  • Before the beginning of this century, the only information we had about Ancient Babylon was from the Bible. Consequently, most of the literature that I have read on the subject (written during the height of Iraqi Archeaology in the 1920's and 30's) has been on a religious note rather than a historical one. This book changed all that. It brought a highly academic subject to the layman. It is a simple, informative account of how the real Babylonians lived. It describes the Babylonians as an advanced people who appreciated art and literature, as well as entering into contracts and having mortgages. It is a great introduction to an ancient civilisation.