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ePub The Ecological Life: Discovering Citizenship and a Sense of Humanity (Nature's Meaning) download

by Jeremy Bendik-Keymer

ePub The Ecological Life: Discovering Citizenship and a Sense of Humanity (Nature's Meaning) download
Author:
Jeremy Bendik-Keymer
ISBN13:
978-0742534476
ISBN:
0742534472
Language:
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (January 26, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1900 kb
Fb2 file:
1392 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
496

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He argues for a sense of ecological justice consonant with human rights .

He argues for a sense of ecological justice consonant with human rights, and shows how humanistic thinking is committed to deepening respect for life and our ecological orientation. Written as a series of lectures, The Ecological Life offers a humanistic perspective on environmental philosophy that challenges some of the dogmas of deep ecology and radical environmentalism while speaking for their best desires. The book argues that being human-centered leaves us open to ecological identifications, rather than the opposite. Bendik-Keymer draws on analytic and continental traditions of philosophy as well as literature and visual media.

by Jeremy Bendik-Keymer. ISBN 13: 9780742534476. Publication Date: 1/26/2006. Help your friends save money!

The Ecological Life book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Ecological Life: Discovering Citizenship and a Sense of Humanity as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

The Ecological Life book. Start by marking The Ecological Life: Discovering Citizenship and a Sense of Humanity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This listing is for Nature's Meaning: The Ecological Life : Discovering .

This listing is for Nature's Meaning: The Ecological Life : Discovering Citizenship and a Sense of Humanity by Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2006, Hardcover) ISBN 9780742534476: All previously owned books are guaranteed to be in good condition.

In The Ecological Life, Jeremy Bendik-Keymer presents in the form of lectures to an undergraduate class in an American liberal arts college an argument justifying the need to develop a greener philosophy and practice. As a moral philosopher, he constructs a convincing argument that we must and can "discover" a cosmopolitan citizenship that respects and nurtures a healthier human society in relation to a more fully appreciated and understood earth.

Written as a series of lectures, The Ecological Life offers a humanistic perspective on environmental philosophy that challenges some of the dogmas of deep ecology and radical environmentalism . Similar books and articles. A Sense of Ecological Humanity.

Written as a series of lectures, The Ecological Life offers a humanistic perspective on environmental philosophy that challenges some of the dogmas of deep ecology and radical environmentalism while speaking for. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer - 2002 - Social Philosophy Today 18:125-136. Citizenship and the Environment. Andrew Dobson - 2003 - Oxford University Press. Analogical Extension and Analogical Implication in Environmental Moral Philosophy. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer - 2001 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):149-158.

Thoreau's life and writings, argues Cafaro, present a positive, life-affirming environmental ethics, combining respect .

Thoreau's life and writings, argues Cafaro, present a positive, life-affirming environmental ethics, combining respect and restraint with an appreciation for human possibilities for flourishing within nature. Philip Cafaro is an assistant professor of philosophy at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado. Bibliographic information. Thoreau's Living Ethics: Walden and the Pursuit of Virtue.

Written as a series of lectures, The Ecological Life offers a humanistic perspective on environmental philosophy that challenges some of the dogmas of deep ecology and radical environmentalism while speaking for their best desires. The book argues that being human-centered leaves us open to ecological identifications, rather than the opposite. Bendik-Keymer draws on analytic and continental traditions of philosophy as well as literature and visual media. He argues for a sense of ecological justice consonant with human rights, and shows how humanistic thinking is committed to deepening respect for life and our ecological orientation. In a clear, jargon-free and conversational tone, The Ecological Life presents a timely and important contribution to civic engagement in an ecological century.
  • The Ecological Life comes to the aid of those who hold (seemingly) conflicted desires to care for the self, care for others, and care for the earth. It does this by clearing a path into an under-explored question: Is there a sense of humanity that commits us to respecting non-human life? For the civic-minded and eco-conscious readers who struggle with feelings of moral schizophrenia, this book is an antidote to obscurity.

    Before I go on, I should tell you my relation to the book: I was an undergraduate student of Jeremy Bendik-Keymer while he was writing this book. So, I have a closer relation to the book than had I picked it up off the shelf of Barnes and Nobles. But, this review comes three years after reading the book, so I have the advantage of writing about what stuck to my memory over time.

    The Ecological Life is an imagined lecture series at a fictive liberal arts campus with a small, culturally mixed class of students (or so I presume, judging by their names). The class meets in an informal lecture format, with plenty of room for Q&A, and a few multi-media presentations. Rather than chapters, the book is organized by lecture, each dedicated to significant people in Bendik-Keymer's life.

    Throughout the course, you sense the movement of the day when, for example, Bendik-Keymer draws attention to the shifting shadows on the wall that betray the movement of the sun. You remember that the argument is spoken, because students interject questions when points aren't clear. At times you see passages on the blackboard, or lists the class has brainstormed, or contemplate the significance of human land-relations, as the lights dim, and Bendik-Keymer illuminates the room with slides from around the world, scenes of beautiful and sacred places in nature. Sometimes the conversation sounds contrived, sometimes the students a bit too eager. But still, the class is engaging. What's more, this delivery constantly reminds us of our connection to our physical surroundings, and that philosophical work is relational.

    The language is conversational and free of jargon; the style is poetic and full of rich description. It's accessible to the average Jane who likes clear, articulate argument, but doesn't have much formal training in philosophy or the mechanics of logic. Bendik-Keymer teaches the reader how to apply logic and analysis to the messy and complicated problems of our busy lives (if only my logic professor had taken this approach!)

    Analogical Identification, the topic of my favorite lecture, shows us how to combine a tool of logic with a sense of humanity in order to identify with other forms of life. This discussion springs from an argument by the philosopher Cora Diamond, and a story about a group of scientists who watch and laugh at a deformed gorilla. The gorilla is not human, and it doesn't know that the scientists are laughing at its deformity. But Bendik-Keymer asks: is there something inhuman about the act of laughing at another creature's suffering? He argues that there is, through analogical identification.

    As the effects of overpopulation and excessive consumption on the planet continue to headline the news, this book reminds and reassures us that the effort to respect the earth and its myriad life forms is a sign of our humanity.

  • Imagine what would happen if CS Lewis took "Mere Christianity" and wrote about the environment. That's basically what this book is. It's largely a philosophical discussion on having an ecological-mindset and changing your environmental morals. His main point is that we should be "ecological citizens", i.e., we should respect all forms of life because "Life is something rare."

    It's not one of those generic environmental books where the author is excessively cynical and rants about global warming, deforestation, etc. The author is more focused on explaining why life in general deserves respect. He gives some good examples, but I think there are some holes in his arguments. Also, the format of the book is set up so that the author writes as if he were a professor, and you, the reader, are his students. This lets Keymer make his point, then have some random student retort in a colloquial "so what?" type response, and then he'll respond to that student. Anyways, overall, I thought it was ok, he brings up some interesting points/examples, but not too much you shouldn't already know.

  • If you have ever wondered why people don't care about the environment and what you can do about it, you should read this book. Its answer demonstrates how important philosophical thinking about such issues is.

    The author suggests that we are all greener than we think, and respect for nature is something that just needs to be pulled out of us. In doing this, he rejects the requirement deep ecology seems to push: that we transform ourselves into something else.

    Most environmental ethics explain to us what we are doing wrong, and what we ought to stop. Sometimes these instructions are mostly about how we think "we ought to stop thinking anthropocentrically." (And of course, sometimes the instructions are just plain ol' "oughts", we ought not to harm animals.) But, especially if, say, global poverty is the main cause of environmental destruction, perhaps our environmental ethic ought to inspire us to act in ways we would not have otherwise thought of. I think the author's proposal in this wonderfully careful and readable book has the potential to do this. I think this because he supplies norms we do not normally encounter (not in our day-to-day life, nor in our reading). If you think ethics matters, I can't overstate how novel and important this contribution is.