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ePub Torture and Eucharist: Theology, Politics, and the Body of Christ (Challenges in Contemporary Theology) download

by William T. Cavanaugh

ePub Torture and Eucharist: Theology, Politics, and the Body of Christ (Challenges in Contemporary Theology) download
Author:
William T. Cavanaugh
ISBN13:
978-0631211198
ISBN:
0631211195
Language:
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (February 12, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1375 kb
Fb2 file:
1674 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
713

The book as a whole ties eucharistic theology to concreteeucharistic practice, showing that the Eucharist is not a "symbol"but a real cathartic summary of the practices by which God formspeople into the Body of Christ.

The book as a whole ties eucharistic theology to concreteeucharistic practice, showing that the Eucharist is not a "symbol"but a real cathartic summary of the practices by which God formspeople into the Body of Christ, producing a sense of communionstronger than that of any nation-state.

Torture and Eucharist book. Cavanaugh gives examples of how the confessions of torture victims are Parts of this book are so dense, but it is certainly worth trudging through

Torture and Eucharist book. Cavanaugh gives examples of how the confessions of torture victims are Parts of this book are so dense, but it is certainly worth trudging through. Cavanaugh uses the details of Pinochet's oppressive regime to paint the big picture of torture and its ultimate antidote - the Eucharist. Some big ideas: the function of torture is to break down social bodies. By breaking down individual bodies, torturers use pain to isolate individuals and destroy communication.

In this engrossing analysis, Cavanaugh contends that the Eucharist is the Church'sĀ . Cavanaugh's book combines narrative and argument, is beautifully written and presents us with a creative.

In this engrossing analysis, Cavanaugh contends that the Eucharist is the Church's response to the use of torture as a social discipline. The author develops a theology of the political which presents torture as one instance of a larger confrontation of powers over bodies, both individual and social. Torture and Eucharist not only has superb qualities as a textbook, but is an outstanding piece of creative ecclesiology. Cavanaugh's book combines narrative and argument, is beautifully written and presents us with a creative ecclesiology. International Journal in Philosophy and Theology.

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The book as a whole ties eucharistic theology to concrete eucharistic practice, showing that the Eucharist is not a 2symbol" but a real cathartic summary of the practices by which God forms people into the Body of Christ, producing a sense of communion stronger than that of an. .

The book as a whole ties eucharistic theology to concrete eucharistic practice, showing that the Eucharist is not a 2symbol" but a real cathartic summary of the practices by which God forms people into the Body of Christ, producing a sense of communion stronger than that of any nation state. Pages: 304 Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Published: 1998 ISBN-10: 0631211993 ISBN-13: 9780631211990.

Torture and Eucharist : Theology, Politics, and the Body of Christ. In this engrossing analysis, Cavanaugh contends that the Eucharist is the Church's response to the use of torture as a social discipline. Part of the Challenges in Contemporary Theology Series). by William T. Cavanaugh.

Torture and the Eucharist: Theology, Politics, and the Body of Christ. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 1998. Cavanaugh, William, Jeffery W. Bailey, and Craig Hovey, eds. An Eerdmans Reader in Contemporary Political Theology. Theopolitical Imagination. New York: T&T Clark, 2003. Scott, Peter and William Cavanaugh, eds. The Blackwell Companion to Political Theology. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Cavanaugh's central thesis is that torture and the eucharist are opposing disciplines using different meansĀ . Related books and articles.

Cavanaugh's central thesis is that torture and the eucharist are opposing disciplines using different means and serving different ends. Where torture can be viewed as a kind of practice or liturgy for the realization of state power over bodies (as well as the souls who inhabit them), the eucharist is a practice or liturgy mystically forming the Church as the Body of Christ, marked by resistance to worldly power that runs counter to God's kingdom. Cavanaugh argues that one major effect of such isolation and intimidation is the consequent destruction of opposition communities.

This post introduces the book and the series of posts that will follow. Torture and Eucharist: Theology, Politics and the Body of Christ, Introduction April 26, 2019 Jack Hartjes. Patheos Explore the world's faith through different perspectives on religion and spirituality! Patheos has the views of the prevalent religions and spiritualities of the world.

by William T. Series: Challenges in Contemporary Theology. Recently added by. prothumialibrary, TBN-NBTS, JacobusArminius, fitz green, DustinHoo, Neildkylejr, Noah. Lee24, patl, Indexlibrarian.

In this engrossing analysis, Cavanaugh contends that the Eucharist is the Church's response to the use of torture as a social discipline.
  • Cavanaugh's book shows what Radical Orthodoxy is all about--he traces some of the myths that drive Western nation-states to medieval theological hiccups; he delves the resources of Christian liturgy for strength to resist the all-envious nation-state; he points to times and places that the Church has really "gotten it right" and taken a stand against the idols and empires in the name of Christian charity.

    Best of all, Cavanaugh does it in such a manner that a reader who has trouble with John Milbank's dizzying syntax (and I are one) can make it though his book without having to read each paragraph three times.

    For people who suspect that neocon political ideology is more sinister than we've been led to think, and for people who believe that the Peace of Christ is neither utopian dream nor otherworldly sigh but practices through which the gracious Father of the universe, incarnated in the Son and empowering peaceable communities through the Spirit, can redeem, even if incompletely, the world which God so loves.

  • Reveals the nature of the church as one kind of community, the nature of Pinochet's Chile (and of the US leaders who supported that regime) as quite another.

  • Cavanaugh brings together seemingly disparate rituals - torture and eucharist - and through an illuminating dialogical engagement between them reveals the radical political implications of Christian liturgy. In this he exposes what authentic theology must proclaim and what the true political life of the Church must be. This book is a must read!

  • An Absolutely fantastic read! A truly engaging book. You will never, ever look at the Eucharist the same again. Guaranteed.

  • Product was received as promised and matched the seller's description.

  • I purchased this for a seminary class.

  • I sent it as a gift and it was delivered in record time.
    excellent srevice.

  • This is a book with a narrow focus taht has far-reaching implications. Cavanaugh examines Chile under the Pinochet regime. This regime used torture as a tool of the state. In essence, torture became a "liturgy" of the state. Unfortunately, the church was not prepared to deal with such a turn of events. That is because the ecclesiology of the church at the time held that the state was to care for the body while the church cared for the soul. This dualism created problems for the church resisting the torture of the state.

    It is at this point that Eucharist is suggested as a counter liturgy. Where torture individualizes, the Eucharist creates a social body. Eucharist helps others while the torture only harms. In short, Eucharist provides the means for the church to engage meaninfully the wayward state.

    This book says wonderful things about the situation in Chile. It could also have implications in other contexts. What does it mean for the Eucharist to act as a counter liturgy to the litugy of capitalism? How does the building up of a social body in Eucharist allow Christians to deal with the fragmentation of war? There is much more that could be said based on what Cavanaugh does in this wonderful book.