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ePub Spoken Taiwanese (English and Tai Languages Edition) download

by Nicholas C Bodman

ePub Spoken Taiwanese (English and Tai Languages Edition) download
Author:
Nicholas C Bodman
ISBN13:
978-0879504618
ISBN:
0879504617
Publisher:
Spoken Language Services (May 1, 1980)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1589 kb
Fb2 file:
1324 kb
Other formats:
rtf lit mbr lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
112

Nicholas C. Bodman books have their own Romanization System that is distinct from the original Chuch Vernacular Romanization (POJ).

Nicholas C. I am currently publishing a handbook that covers top five Taiwanese Romanizations used, including Bodman's. The reveiw which says that this book is worthless is unfair. There is an accompanying audio for the book, and this makes the book very useful.

In R. Scollon & P. LeVine (Ed., Discourse and technology: Multimodal discourse analysis (pp. 59-70). Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press. r342 Sutton-Smith, B. (1997). The ambiguity of play

Spoken Taiwanese book.

Spoken Taiwanese book. Dialogues rewritten from Spoken Amoy Hokkien by Wu Su-chu. Details (if other): Cancel.

Regional and stylistic varieties of English pronunciation. 3. the methods of joining speech sounds together in words and at their junction, or the methods of effecting VC, CV, CC, and VV transitions

Regional and stylistic varieties of English pronunciation. Lecture 2. National and regional pronunciation variants in English. the methods of joining speech sounds together in words and at their junction, or the methods of effecting VC, CV, CC, and VV transitions. The second component is the syllabic structure of words. The syllabic structure has two aspects, which are inseparable from each other: syllable formation and syllable division.

Cornelius C. Kubler, "Intermediate Spoken Chinese: A Practical Approach to Fluency in Spoken Mandarin".

English as a school subject is also featured on Taiwan's education exams.

Hokkien is a Min Chinese variety originating in southern Fujian and is spoken by many overseas Chinese throughout Southeast Asia. Recently there has been a growing use of Taiwanese Hokkien in the broadcast media. Members of the Hakka Chinese subgroup, who are concentrated in several counties throughout Taiwan, often speak Hakka Chinese. English as a school subject is also featured on Taiwan's education exams.

Of course there are Taiwanese people who speak English in Taiwan, as well as foreigners who speak their own mother tongues

Many people speak 閩南語, which you may call Minnan, Hoklo, Hokkien, Amoy, or whatever. It’s a dialect of Chinese, and is losing a lot of diversity . Of course there are Taiwanese people who speak English in Taiwan, as well as foreigners who speak their own mother tongues. Written Chinese is the same throughout Taiwan. 461 views · View 1 Upvoter.

From various forms of Chinese, to English, and th. There is also a widespread dialect form of Chinese known as Hokkien (also known simply as Taiwanese) that originates from the widespread historical immigration of populations from Southern China. Written Chinese in Taiwan is based on the traditional system of characters, in contrast to the simplified Chinese seen on the mainland. It’s vocabulary is still modern Mandarin Chinese (as opposed to classical), although there are some local differences unique to Taiwan.

  • In response to Chao-Hong Wang, Spoken Taiwanese is book 3 of a series. It is preceded by Spoken Amoy Hokkien Volume I (book 1) and Spoken Amoy Hokkien Volume II (book 2). Book 1 discusses tones and phonetics. Nicholas C. Bodman books have their own Romanization System that is distinct from the original Chuch Vernacular Romanization (POJ). I am currently publishing a handbook that covers top five Taiwanese Romanizations used, including Bodman's.

  • Good job!

  • The reveiw which says that this book is worthless is unfair. There is an accompanying audio for the book, and this makes the book very useful. Audio and visual material are both necessary to learn a foreign language with any degree of fluency. The audio for this book is available on tape or disc.
    It is very easy to follow this book while listening to the audio, and I consider it a valuable asset to my language learning materials.

  • 1) This is an ancient reprint. The typeface used is very poor and the reproduction is often not dark or large enough.

    2) Only using a Romanization makes this book almost useless when working with a native speaker. Without reinforcing Chinese characters at every opportunity, the student is wasting their time.

    3) No explanation of pronounciation and tone system makes the book of ZERO value when trying to learn on your own. (I suppose if you already spoke Taiwanese, the book would have some value, but... why would you buy it if you already spoke Taiwanese?)

    4) There is no organization of grammar.

    5) Worst: I have no idea if Kejia Hua (Hokkien) is that similar to Taiwanese. This book is a "conversion" of a Hokkien book. Had the title clearly indicated as such, I certainly would not have bought this.

    6) Only positive: paper is suitable bonfire or latrine use.

    7) Consummer fraud any way you slice it... maybe ok at a yard sale of $0.25, but no more...

  • This textbook is a great introduction to the Taiwanese language. It is unfortunate that this book has gotten a bad reputation because of misunderstandings of it's usage. As a few other reviewers pointed out this book is meant to be used with Spoken Amoy Hokkien (2 Volume Set). Spoken Amoy has all of the relevant grammar that makes Spoken Taiwanese understandable and usable.

    That out of the way, the lessons in the book are good, and the audio (though a little dated in sound) is clear and audible. The speaker (yes, there is only one speaker on the tape) seems fast, but then again it is best to listen to people the speak at a conversational level early, rather then at a slow and artificial speed. The lessons texts seem a little dense at the start, but it levels out latter on. The text is dated to the mid-80's but is still mostly relevant (I would imagine). All in all a great way to learn Taiwanese, especially seeing as there are few such texts on the English market.

    The only thing I would have loved to seen is the use of Chinese characters in the text (for either Amoy or Taiwanese [or both preferably]), thus the 4 stars instead of 5. But seeing as this is still a great introduction to spoken Taiwanese, and seeing as picking up spoken Taiwanese (as is the case with any dialect of Chinese) is much easier then picking up the written form, this is still a great textbook.

    As far as the age issue of the text, please see my review of Spoken Amoy Hokkien here on Amazon.

  • I totally disagree with the other reviewers. I bought the book on the strength of their positive comments. Big mistake. This book has no explanation of pronuciation, tones, grammar, or language usage. Example:
    "Have you eaten yet Mr Iu? Iu sian si ciaq-pa bue"
    How would you know the pronunciation of these words? How does the romanized system work? What is the the grammar structure? You won't find any answers in this book. In Taiwanese they say Iu Mr. the other way round to English and usually put the name at the beginning of most sentences. Again different to English, where don't always use peoples names. Also, have you eaten yet is equivalent to the English, "how are you doing?" or "how are you?". It's not an invitation or suggestion to get some food. There is no valuable info like that in this book.
    To cap it all, the language it uses is very old fashioned and different to how most people use Min nan hua in Taiwan today.
    Sadly, I agree with the reviewers on one point. There are almost no Taiwanese language books available :O(
    I taught myself to speak and read Chinese successfully, but I won't be able to make any progress in Taiwanese with book like this.

  • the reviewers who trashed this book were correct in that it doesn't provide enough explanation, but they're also pretty much complaining that a screw-driver makes a bad hammer. This book is a re-writing of dialogues from Spoken Amoy Hokkien which is a great book and goes into great grammatical detail. So, if you buy this as a supplement to Spoken Amoy Hokkien (as it was meant to be) then there's plenty of grammatical explanation.
    I've used the Spoken Cantonese courses (both I and II) and they are great. I plan on buying the Spoken Language course for each
    new language I learn. The thing is, without the cassettes you'll get nowhere. It's impossible for a Westerner to learn any tonal language without listening to native speakers. If you expect to understand the pronunciation by just buying a book, it's your expectations that are messed up not the book. Perhaps the problem lies in the fact that it isn't explicitly stated on the outside of the book (because it is stated in the forward) that the text is a supplement.