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ePub From Shakespeare to Existentialism: Essays on Shakespeare and Goethe; Hegel and Kierkegaard; Nietzsche, Rilke and Freud; Jaspers, Heidegger, and Toynbee download

by Walter A. Kaufmann

ePub From Shakespeare to Existentialism: Essays on Shakespeare and Goethe; Hegel and Kierkegaard; Nietzsche, Rilke and Freud; Jaspers, Heidegger, and Toynbee download
Author:
Walter A. Kaufmann
ISBN13:
978-0691064208
ISBN:
0691064202
Language:
Publisher:
Princeton University Press (August 21, 1980)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1818 kb
Fb2 file:
1509 kb
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
730

Princeton University Press (1980). The goal of the left has been predominantly libertarian: the realization of equal individual freedom.

Items related to From Shakespeare to Existentialism: Essays on Shakespeare. is critics like Mr. Kaufmann who often prove the most stimulating to read the most memorable in their effect. Walter A. Kaufmann From Shakespeare to Existentialism: Essays on Shakespeare and Goethe, Hegel and Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Rilke and Freud, Jaspers, Heidegger and Toynbee. ISBN 13: 9780691013671.

From Shakespeare to Existentialism book. s/t: Essays on Shakespeare and Goethe; Hegel and. s/t: Essays on Shakespeare and Goethe; Hegel and Kierkegaard; Nietzsche, Rilke and Freud; Jaspers, Heidegger and Toynbee Explores such themes as philosophy versus poetry, post-World War II German thought, art, tradition, and truth in a collection of essays.

Walter A. Kaufmann From Shakespeare to Existentialism: Essays on Shakespeare and Goethe; Hegel and Kierkegaard; Nietzsche, Rilke and Freud; Jaspers, Heidegger, and Toynbee. ISBN 13: 9780691064208.

From Shakespeare to existentialism Walter Arnold Kaufmann Metin Parçacığı . Walter Kaufmann was born in Freiburg, Germany in July 1, 1921. His first book, a critical study of Nietzsche, was published in 1950.

From Shakespeare to existentialism Walter Arnold Kaufmann Metin Parçacığı görünümü - 1960. Tümünü görüntüle . Yazar hakkında (1980). He arrived in the United States at the age of 17 and became a citizen in 1944. His other works include Critique of Religion and Philosophy, From Shakespeare to Existentialism, The Faith of a Heretic, Tragedy and Philosophy, Without Guilt and Justice, Religions in Four Dimensions, and Man's Lot. He died on September 4, 1980 at the age of 59.

s/t: Essays on Shakespeare and Goethe; Hegel and Kierkegaard; Nietzsche, Rilke and Freud; Jaspers, Heidegger and ToynbeeExplores such themes as philosophy versus poetry, post-World War II German thought, art, tradition, and truth in a collection of essays. The Portable Nietzsche. by Friedrich Nietzsche · Walter Kaufmann.

Home Browse Books Book details, From Shakespeare to. .But we need not choose between positivism and existentialism of that sort any more than between Christianity and materialism.

Home Browse Books Book details, From Shakespeare to Existentialism: Studies i.From Shakespeare to Existentialism: Studies in Poetry, Religion, and Philosophy. The outlook toward which this book points is developed more fully in my Critique of Religion and Philosophy. Here are some of the historical studies out of which my Critique has grown; there are some of my own conclusions.

A companion volume to his Critique of Religion and Philosophy, this book offers Walter Kaufmann's critical interpretations of some of the great minds in Western philosophy, religion, and literature.

  • What I like most about Kaufmann is his direct, intelligent, opinionated prose. It feels like he's right there with you. (Strangely enough he had an extremely thick German accent.) This book is a fascinating and idiosyncratic series of essays that is a great companion to anyone deeply interested in western philosophy and literature starting from the late 1500s. More particularly, this book is helpful for those attempting to incorporate some of this tradition into their own education, philosophy and life in general.

  • Kaufmann, a true disciple of Nietzsche, stands at so many intersections of thought. He is a philosopher, literary theorist, historian, and psychologist. This is a dazzling book in which Professor Kaufmann undertakes the ambitious task of providing critical comparisons and tracking intellectual history. While the book largely focuses on German thought, Kaufmann also includes lofty, and brilliant, commentary on figures as diverse as Socrates, Shakespeare, Eliot, Stein, and Sartre while also continuing his discourse on figures like Goethe and Hegel. Even though some of his essays seem general, his Nietzscheanism is present through the use of advanced irony and the idea that language is a construction that can be toyed with, thus making the essays far more intricate than one might think from a first reading. Kaufmann, again following Nietzsche`s example, also shows that philosophical writing can be beautiful.

  • Excellent

  • You don't have to agree with everything Kaufmann writes to find the book valuable for the range of the ideas it touches on. At times, direct and humorous.

  • Walter Arnold Kaufmann (1921-1980) was a German-American philosopher, translator, and poet, who taught for over 30 years at Princeton University. He wrote many other books, such as Critique of Religion and Philosophy,Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist,The Faith of a Heretic,Without Guilt and Justice: From Decidophobia to Autonomy,Existentialism, Religion, and Death: Thirteen Essays,Existentialism from Dostoevsky to Sartre, etc.

    [NOTE: page numbers below refer to a 455-page paperback edition.

    He wrote in the Preface to this 1959 collection, “This book is the fruit, albeit not the only one, of almost ten years’ work. Drafts for various chapters have appeared here and there, but all of them have been revised, for the most part very extensively… the book traces a historical development---and gradually various themes are developed… The outlook toward which this book points is developed more fully in my ‘Critique of Religion and Philosophy.’ Here are some of the historical studies out of which my Critique has grown; there are some of my own conclusions… This is certainly not positivist historiography but writing that comes perilously close to existentialism… But we need not choose between positivism and existentialism… One can write … without embracing the profoundly unsound methods and the dangerous contempt for reason that have been so prominent in existentialism.”

    In the first essay, he observes, “There have never been so many writers, artists, and philosophers. Any past age that could boast of more than one outstanding sculptor or philosopher the whole world over and more than three good writers and painters wins our admiration as unusually productive; and many an age had none of great distinction.” (Pg. 2)

    He states, “Against the tendency of modern critics to assimilate Homer, Sophocles, and Socrates to Christian norms and to write as if great poetry and high morality were necessarily Christian, one has to insist how relatively isolated phenomenon Christian culture has been and that even in the West it could be pictured with equal justice as an episode that, with the possible exception of ‘The Divine Comedy,’ produced no literary work to equal either Greek or Hebrew literature, of Shakespeare.” (Pg. 89)

    He suggests, “Goethe’s development probably helped to suggest to Hegel the interesting, but surely untenable, idea that ALL styles, outlooks, religions, and philosophies can be arranged in a single sequence of increasing maturity… This was the second great error which affects not only the ‘Phenomenology’ but also the later works.” (Pg. 160)

    He points out that Hegel did NOT use the “thesis, antithesis, synthesis” model that is often used to characterize his thought: “Both Marx and Kierkegaard… did Hegel a grave injustice when they misinterpreted his dialectic as a tireless three-step, moving mechanically from theses to antitheses and hence to syntheses. The triad of thesis, antithesis, and synthesis is encountered in Kant, Fichte, and Schelling, but mentioned only once in the twenty volumes of Hegel’s works… not approvingly but at the end of his critique of Kant, in the lectures on the history of philosophy. A similar disapproval of this ‘triplicity’ is found earlier in the preface to the Phenomenology.” (Pg. 166)

    He notes, “In his famous lecture on ‘Existentialism,’ [Jean-Paul] Sartre has called [Karl] Jaspers a professed Catholic, though his background is in fact Protestant and his religious outlook quite nondenominational. The… ‘Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church’ wrongly classifies him as a ‘Christian’ existentialist. Jaspers’ faith is distinctly Kantian and not at all centered in Christ. In his philosophy of history, too, he does not find the ‘axis’ of history in the Incarnation but in the age of the Hebrew prophets, the Greek philosophers, Confucius, Lao-tzu, and the Buddha.” (Pg. 285)

    He states, “Freud… could not possibly have felt that his work was above all criticism, as so many of his critics have alleged he did… it is noteworthy that Freud told a close friend that The Future of an Illusion ‘had little value.’ And ‘to Ferenczi he was still more outspoken in his derogation of the book: ‘Now it already seems to me childish; fundamentally I think otherwise; I regard it as weak analytically and inadequate as a self-confession.’” (Pg. 327)

    He comments about Heidegger: “In all his later writings, Heidegger insists on the importance of questions and not on answers, on thinking rather than conclusions… He fills pages with scorn for the superficial answers given by others but… argues that the impossibility of final answers is a feature of our age and keeps alive the hope that, if we follow him… some of us may yet enter the promised land… in his lectures he makes so much of the courage and tenacity of the attempt to face Being that … The fascination of his lectures and books is due in no small measure to the way in which he manages to keep alive the hope that in just a few more pages, or surely before the course is over, we may see something that even now reduces any other enterprise to insignificance.” (Pg. 344-345) Later, he adds, “What stands between him and greatness is neither the opaqueness of his style… nor his temporary acceptance of Nazism… but his lack of vision. After everything has been said, he really does not have very much to say.” (Pg. 365)

    He asserts, “If a single factor accounts more than any other for [historian Arnold] Toynbee’s popularity in the United States, it is surely his concern with religion---not simply the fact of his concern but above all the nature of his concern. In an age in which books become bestsellers because they seem to prove scientifically that the Bible is right, Toynbee could hardly fail to be a popular success. His frequent references to God and Christ and his thousands of footnote references to the New Testament, which record his every use of a biblical turn of speech, assure the Christian reader that the Bible is proved right, while his growing hope for a vast syncretism pleases those who feel that the one thing needful is a meeting of East and West. Toynbee makes a great show of religion… but he presses no unequivocal or incisive demands… Toynbee’s religion is ingratiating---like that of politicians and our most successful magazines. He offers us history, social science, anecdotes, schemes, entertainment---all this and heaven, too.” (Pg. 407)

    This is an extremely thought-provoking, controversial, and opinionated volume---that will for just those reasons be of tremendous interest to anyone studying contemporary philosophy.

  • Walter Arnold Kaufmann (1921-1980) was a German-American philosopher, translator, and poet, who taught for over 30 years at Princeton University. He wrote many other books, such as Critique of Religion and Philosophy,Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist,The Faith of a Heretic,Without Guilt and Justice: From Decidophobia to Autonomy,Existentialism, Religion, and Death: Thirteen Essays,Existentialism from Dostoevsky to Sartre, etc.

    He wrote in the Preface to this 1959 collection, “This book is the fruit, albeit not the only one, of almost ten years’ work. Drafts for various chapters have appeared here and there, but all of them have been revised, for the most part very extensively… the book traces a historical development---and gradually various themes are developed… The outlook toward which this book points is developed more fully in my ‘Critique of Religion and Philosophy.’ Here are some of the historical studies out of which my Critique has grown; there are some of my own conclusions… This is certainly not positivist historiography but writing that comes perilously close to existentialism… But we need not choose between positivism and existentialism… One can write … without embracing the profoundly unsound methods and the dangerous contempt for reason that have been so prominent in existentialism.”

    In the first essay, he observes, “There have never been so many writers, artists, and philosophers. Any past age that could boast of more than one outstanding sculptor or philosopher the whole world over and more than three good writers and painters wins our admiration as unusually productive; and many an age had none of great distinction.” (Pg. 2)

    He states, “Against the tendency of modern critics to assimilate Homer, Sophocles, and Socrates to Christian norms and to write as if great poetry and high morality were necessarily Christian, one has to insist how relatively isolated phenomenon Christian culture has been and that even in the West it could be pictured with equal justice as an episode that, with the possible exception of ‘The Divine Comedy,’ produced no literary work to equal either Greek or Hebrew literature, of Shakespeare.” (Pg. 89)

    He suggests, “Goethe’s development probably helped to suggest to Hegel the interesting, but surely untenable, idea that ALL styles, outlooks, religions, and philosophies can be arranged in a single sequence of increasing maturity… This was the second great error which affects not only the ‘Phenomenology’ but also the later works.” (Pg. 160)

    He points out that Hegel did NOT use the “thesis, antithesis, synthesis” model that is often used to characterize his thought: “Both Marx and Kierkegaard… did Hegel a grave injustice when they misinterpreted his dialectic as a tireless three-step, moving mechanically from theses to antitheses and hence to syntheses. The triad of thesis, antithesis, and synthesis is encountered in Kant, Fichte, and Schelling, but mentioned only once in the twenty volumes of Hegel’s works… not approvingly but at the end of his critique of Kant, in the lectures on the history of philosophy. A similar disapproval of this ‘triplicity’ is found earlier in the preface to the Phenomenology.” (Pg. 166)

    He notes, “In his famous lecture on ‘Existentialism,’ [Jean-Paul] Sartre has called [Karl] Jaspers a professed Catholic, though his background is in fact Protestant and his religious outlook quite nondenominational. The… ‘Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church’ wrongly classifies him as a ‘Christian’ existentialist. Jaspers’ faith is distinctly Kantian and not at all centered in Christ. In his philosophy of history, too, he does not find the ‘axis’ of history in the Incarnation but in the age of the Hebrew prophets, the Greek philosophers, Confucius, Lao-tzu, and the Buddha.” (Pg. 285)

    He states, “Freud… could not possibly have felt that his work was above all criticism, as so many of his critics have alleged he did… it is noteworthy that Freud told a close friend that The Future of an Illusion ‘had little value.’ And ‘to Ferenczi he was still more outspoken in his derogation of the book: ‘Now it already seems to me childish; fundamentally I think otherwise; I regard it as weak analytically and inadequate as a self-confession.’” (Pg. 327)

    He comments about Heidegger: “In all his later writings, Heidegger insists on the importance of questions and not on answers, on thinking rather than conclusions… He fills pages with scorn for the superficial answers given by others but… argues that the impossibility of final answers is a feature of our age and keeps alive the hope that, if we follow him… some of us may yet enter the promised land… in his lectures he makes so much of the courage and tenacity of the attempt to face Being that … The fascination of his lectures and books is due in no small measure to the way in which he manages to keep alive the hope that in just a few more pages, or surely before the course is over, we may see something that even now reduces any other enterprise to insignificance.” (Pg. 344-345) Later, he adds, “What stands between him and greatness is neither the opaqueness of his style… nor his temporary acceptance of Nazism… but his lack of vision. After everything has been said, he really does not have very much to say.” (Pg. 365)

    He asserts, “If a single factor accounts more than any other for [historian Arnold] Toynbee’s popularity in the United States, it is surely his concern with religion---not simply the fact of his concern but above all the nature of his concern. In an age in which books become bestsellers because they seem to prove scientifically that the Bible is right, Toynbee could hardly fail to be a popular success. His frequent references to God and Christ and his thousands of footnote references to the New Testament, which record his every use of a biblical turn of speech, assure the Christian reader that the Bible is proved right, while his growing hope for a vast syncretism pleases those who feel that the one thing needful is a meeting of East and West. Toynbee makes a great show of religion… but he presses no unequivocal or incisive demands… Toynbee’s religion is ingratiating---like that of politicians and our most successful magazines. He offers us history, social science, anecdotes, schemes, entertainment---all this and heaven, too.” (Pg. 407)

    This is an extremely thought-provoking, controversial, and opinionated volume---that will for just those reasons be of tremendous interest to anyone studying contemporary philosophy.