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ePub A Majority of Scoundrels download

by Don Berry

ePub A Majority of Scoundrels download
Author:
Don Berry
ISBN13:
978-0891740285
ISBN:
0891740287
Language:
Publisher:
Comstock Book Distributors (June 1, 1977)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1201 kb
Fb2 file:
1631 kb
Other formats:
txt doc azw rtf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
593

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Majority of Scoundrels, . .has been added to your Cart. I love the book but, when I received it, it was a reprint of the original manuscript with a very small format and about 7 pt. type. I am an older man and my eye sight is not very good. Disappointed I didn't receive the larger format.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Главная A Majority of Scoundrels. A Majority of Scoundrels. Berry Don. Язык: english.

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Are you sure you want to remove Majority of Scoundrels from your list? Majority of Scoundrels. Published February 12, 1971 by Ballantine Books.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for A Majority of Scoundrels: An Informal . Additional Product Features. Rocky Mountains Books. Paperback Books Don Pendleton. This item doesn't belong on this page.

Additional Product Features. Introduction by. Stephen Dow Beckham.

Books & Magazines. 000221) Berry, Don. A Majority of Scoundrels: An Informal History of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1961.

Don George Berry (January 23, 1932 – February 20, 2001) was an American artist and author best known for his historical novels about early settlers in the Oregon Country. He was born in Redwood Falls, Minnesota but moved to Oregon as a young man and came to think of himself as a native of that state. He attended Reed College in Portland, Oregon.

Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Title: A Majority of Scoundrels. Publisher: Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York. Publication Date: 1961. Book Condition: Poor. Dust Jacket Condition: Poor.

A Majority of Scoundrels: An Informal History of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company
  • A very readable popular history that was well researched and includes enough analysis to make it a serious book and enough gritty detail to make it an enjoyable history. There is no hero worship in this account, something that was seen too much of in previous decades of writing about the mountain men.. Berry's attitude is one of a journalist. His emphasis is often on the business decisions of the characters, which after all is what it was all about. But this attention to economic detail does not detract from the readability. And the culture of extreme independence among the trappers is well depicted. This is a fascinating corner of American history that did indeed have a big effect on the country, especially when the small numbers of the people involved is taken into consideration.

  • I love the book but, when I received it, it was a reprint of the original manuscript with a very small format and about 7 pt. type. I am an older man and my eye sight is not very good. Disappointed I didn't receive the larger format.
    Charles Stewart.

  • a well written book by an author who did a lot of research. with his imagination we weaves quite a story. His style is like he is talking to you. A good read

  • I found this book informative.

  • Read it twice!

  • I found it a geat informal history of early fur trade industry and what was a prelude to settling the great Northwest. The author made it clear what was based on facts and early jounals/letters and what was his personal opinion and conjecture.

  • Subtitle: An Informal History of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. The years covered are 1822 to 1834. This book, copyrighted in 1961, is an excellent popular history of the American mountain men of the period. The author's style is awake and intelligent. He does not extemporize. The book is carefully researched and he is careful to stay within the boundaries of what he knows or to admit when he goes beyond it. For example, in telling the story of Hugh Glass, he refuses to speculate on why John Fitzgerald and Jim Bridger abandoned him.

    "No one will ever know why Fitzgerald and Bridger abandoned Hugh Glass. Speculation is virtually useless, because the whole drama is something quite beyond our comprehension. It has been fictionalized in several ways and explained in several others. I have no theory. They did it, and there began an ordeal that remains one of the most incredible feats of the human animal ever recorded. (56)

    For those who don't know, Glass was severely mauled and bitten by a grizzly bear. Fitzgerald and Bridger were left behind with him, to stay till he recovered or died. They stayed with him, they said, for five days. They said he'd died and they'd buried him. He showed up later, quite alive and ready to kill them for what they'd done. They'd "left him alone, without a rifle, without knife, without even the fixens from his possible sack." His story of survival is one of the classics of the period.

    The book has three parts: [1] Ashley and His Men 1822-1826, [2] Smith, Jackson & Sublette 1826- 1830, [3] The Rocky Mountain Fur Company 1830-1834.

    "The men of the fur trade - the mountain men - were probably the most independent, tough-minded, asocial bunch of nonconformists you are likely to run across. The society in which they lived was virtually anarchic; every man his own conscience, every man assuming the responsibility for his own actions. As a group, they lived more nearly in a rule-less society than any other I can think of. They were aggressively independent as individuals; they knuckled under to no man, and personal freedom was the principal good they sought." (300)

    "To most of modern America, this is not a congenial attitude. We put our faith in the group, in the society, in the state. We organize committees and conduct brainstorming sessions out of some weird conviction that if you get enough third-rate minds working together a first-rate idea is bound to come out of it. The individual impulse is smashed and perverted. Even the normally healthy impulse to freedom becomes converted into a stupidly negative rebellion against society, producing nothing. When the impulse to freedom is thus converted into a purely negative thing, it becomes simple fraudulence; an aping of society, but in the reverse. The superficiality of the society is equaled by the superficiality of the grandstanding rebels; and both derive from the same weakness, a lack of any strong sense of individual worth and responsibility.

    "This was the main thing the mountain men had that made it worth while for them to live the kind of life they did; a massively strong sense of the worth of the individual, and his independence. It is one of the main reasons we find them difficult to comprehend today." (301)

  • This book chronicles the fur trade era from 1822-1834 through the eyes of William Ashley's men and the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. Such giants of the times like Jed Smith, Jim Bridger, the Sublettes, Tom Fitzpatrick and many others are given thorough examination of their roles in attempting to capture the fur trade business, along with their exploration accomplishments of the American west. The cutthroat competition from the Hudson's Bay Company, Astor's American Fur Company and the Missouri Fur Company, not to mention Indian hostilities, hunger, thirst and the always present forces of nature, made the fur trade business a precarious way of life. If one is not familiar with the geography of the west, it would be helpful to have a map handy as there is not one in the book. There were a few typos which can be overlooked, but there is one historical blunder I must point out. This is on page 50. It is mentioned that Vanderburgh and Carson were exempted from Leavenworth's criticism of the Missouri Fur Company's handling of the Aricara battle. This is NOT Kit Carson as the index states it is. This man was Kit's older half brother Moses. Other than these few discrepancies, the book was presented very well and was a pleasure to read.