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ePub Indian Philosophy: An Introduction to Hindu and Buddhist Thought download

by Richard King

ePub Indian Philosophy: An Introduction to Hindu and Buddhist Thought download
Author:
Richard King
ISBN13:
978-0878407569
ISBN:
0878407561
Language:
Publisher:
Georgetown University Press (May 28, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1967 kb
Fb2 file:
1870 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
258

What is Indian Philosophy? Why has India been excluded from the history of philosophy? Richard King provides an introduction to the main schools of Hindu and Buddhist thought.

What is Indian Philosophy? Why has India been excluded from the history of philosophy? Richard King provides an introduction to the main schools of Hindu and Buddhist thought.

This book provides an introduction to the main schools of Indian philosophy within both the Hindu and Buddhist traditions. Richard King analyzes the schools' different doctrines and compares their approaches to specific philosophical topics - ontology, epistemology, perception, consciousness, and creation and causality.

Indian Philosophy book. Richard King provides an introduction to the main schools of Hindu and Buddhist thought, emphasising the living history of interaction and debate between the various traditions.

Similar books and articles. Classical Indian Ethical Thought: A Philosophical Study of Hindu, Jaina, and Buddhist Morals. Kedar Nath Tiwari - 1998 - Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. Indian Thought in T. S. Eliot: An Analysis of the Works of T. Eliot in Relation to the Major Hindu-Buddhist Religious and Philosophical Texts. Alex Wayman & Rāma Karaṇa Śarmā (ed. - 1993 - Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. Fundamental Questions of Indian Metaphysics and Logic. Susil Kumar Maitra - 1974 - University of Calcutta.

Richard E. King is Professor of Buddhist and Asian Studies at the University of Kent, where he specialises in South Asian traditions and critical theory . Indian Philosophy : an Introduction to Hindu and Buddhist Thought. Edinburgh University Press, 1999). King is Professor of Buddhist and Asian Studies at the University of Kent, where he specialises in South Asian traditions and critical theory and Religious Studies.

a b King, Richard (1999), Indian Philosophy: An Introduction to Hindu and Buddhist Thought, Edinburgh University Press, ISBN 978-0-7486-0954-3. Bales, Eugene F. (1987), A Ready Reference to Philosophy East and West, University Press of America, p. 198, ISBN 978-0-8191-6640-1. Warder, Anthony Kennedy (1998), A Course In Indian Philosophy, Motilal Banarsidass, p. 187, ISBN 978-81-208-1244-4. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan; Poolla Tirupati Raju (1960). The concept of man: a study in comparative philosophy.

Oriental Richard King Indian Philosophy.

Mark Siderits, Buddhism as Philosophy: An Introduction (Aldershot, England: Ashgate; Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Company, 2007). 30. Christopher J. Bartley, An Introduction to Indian Philosophy (London; New York. NY: Continuum, 2011). 31. Bina Gupta, An Introduction to Indian Philosophy: Perspectives on Reality, Knowledge and Freedom (New York: Routledge, 2012). 32. Maruti Ram Murty, Indian Philosophy: An Introduction (Peterborough ON: Broadview Press, 2013).

Indian Philosophy: An Introduction to Hindu and Buddhist Thought - Richard King. Hindu Gods and Goddesses - W. J. Wilkins. Religions of India: A User Friendly and Brief Introduction to Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and the Jains - Jack Sikora. Hindi Structures: Intermediate Level, with Drills, Exercises, and Key (Michigan Papers on South and Southeast Asia) - Peter Hook. Hinduism: Experiments in the Sacred - David M. Knipe.

Richard King's book "Indian Philosophy: An Introduction to Hindu and Buddhist Thought" is a well-written and insightful overview of its subject matter. King does not get bogged down in Sanskrit terminology, yet does not ignore it either

Richard King's book "Indian Philosophy: An Introduction to Hindu and Buddhist Thought" is a well-written and insightful overview of its subject matter. King does not get bogged down in Sanskrit terminology, yet does not ignore it either.

This book provides an introduction to the main schools of Indian philosophy within both the Hindu and Buddhist traditions. Richard King analyzes the schools' different doctrines and compares their approaches to specific philosophical topics ― ontology, epistemology, perception, consciousness, and creation and causality. While King's main focus is on the ideas as professed by the major schools of thought, he also takes into account the important contributions made by individual thinkers. Among these are Bhartrhari, who helped introduce linguistic analysis into Indian philosophy; Nagarjuna, the reputed founder of the Mahayana or "Middle Way" school; and Asanga, the believed founder of the Yogacara or "Practice of Yoga" school. This is the first introduction to Indian philosophy written for a western audience to assess Indian thought in its own context and to examine its relationship with the West. King discusses the nature of philosophy in general, examining the shifting usage of the term throughout history. He examines western perceptions of Indian philosophy, exploring the reasons why it has not made substantial inroads into western intellectual discourse. King argues that western scholars will remain tied to a Eurocentric perspective as long as they continue to ignore the possibility of philosophical thought "East of the Suez." This, he argues, highlights the need for a post-colonial and global approach to philosophy. Written in a clear and accessible style, the book can be used for courses in religion, theology, and philosophy.
  • I have been reading this book for some days and the introduction it's really good.
    Some deconstruction postures and revision of prejudices about west and east are explained in a really good way. I have to admit that I am a neophite in the topic although my main interest is in buddhist studies and I was expecting to find some insight here for my research. So far, the book has provided good arguments that I'll take in consideration.

  • I have been waiting for a book like this for many years. Well written, well organized as a learning tool. much of the information and unfamiliar vocabulary is repeated and reintegrated into the development of the main themes. Makes it almost inconceivable that someone could understand the development of Buddhism without the larger Indian context laid out there. Unfortunately no information on Shaivism and little on Shakti worship. Stresses the orthodox interpretations of the major six strains of mainstream Indian philosophy only.

  • I want to make sure I emphasize one point here: this book is a fantastic defense and introduction of Indian Philosophy (or, as King might make us ask: What makes a philosophy distinctly "Indian?"). King is quite a brilliant mind. His work in this book is very appreciated and understated.

    That being said, I think there are some fundamental problems with this book.

    Before I get to that, however, I want to tell you how the book is laid out. Most texts surveying a culture's philosophies are organized by chapters on each perspective. In the case of Indian Philosophy, the specific Darsanas are discussed separately, with reference to other schools of thought, perhaps, within that chapter. King does not do this; instead, his book is laid out by topics. There is a chapter on Ontology which discusses the views of particular individuals and schools on that topic within. There is a chapter on Epistemology which does the same, and so on. I can see why King would make this kind of decision: 1) it allows him to give you a condensed version of the richness of the debates between schools on a particular topic--that history of argumentation in India is something he goes out of his way often to emphasize--, and 2) it allows him to rush the reader with the plethora of views in India on one issue alone, which feeds another aim of his in that generalizations of anything Indian are shown to be incredibly out of touch with reality. And these two things he does quite well.

    By organizing the book this way, King indeed proves the richness and the argumentative nature of the debates, but at the cost of the reader finding a clear image of each darsana. At points, the school-jumping in three paragraphs is so blinding (because we have only received a *tiny* summary of the school in one of the opening chapters of the book) that the content of the debate is lost on the reader due to the lack of context altogether.

    In short: if you are looking for a discussion about the argumentative history of, the topics prevalent in, and the injustice done towards Indian Philosophy, this is a great book for you. If, however, you want to be able to put the book down and have a clear image of the many different ideologies of India and how they interact, I suggest going elsewhere. This is a great book altogether; the first two chapters alone are enough to make you question philosophy as we know it in the West. However, I feel that it misses its aim by a significant margin.

  • For a balanced understanding of some of the issues presented here concerning Hinduism read:

    Indra’s Net DEFENDING HINDUISM’S PHILOSOPHICAL UNITY

    Malhotra, Rajiv (2014-01-22). Indra’s Net: Defending Hinduism’s (Kindle Locations 2-4). HarperCollins Publishers India. Kindle Edition.

    For a better understanding of philosophy and dharma practice there are many safer books to base your views on by realized masters such as Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche; Ponlop Rinpoche, Thrangu Rinpoche, HH Dalai Lama and many more.

  • Richard King's book "Indian Philosophy: An Introduction to Hindu and Buddhist Thought" is a well-written and insightful overview of its subject matter. King does not get bogged down in Sanskrit terminology, yet does not ignore it either. The result is a nice clear flow to the presentation with enough textual references to ensure that this introduction carries over to further studies of one or more of the six schools presented in this volume. He assumes no prior knowledge of these traditions.

    King also does an exquisite job of presenting the question: "What is Philosophy?" and how a `Western' tradition of thought can be compared to the thought of `Eastern' traditions. He does so primarily by showing that such East/West divisions are wrong-headed to begin with. While he does not perform any kind of comparative hermeneutic here, he does take the time in the first two and last chapters to ensure that the arbitrary distinction that is normally made between Oriental and Occidental thought is obviated before he begins discussion of the Hindu and Buddhist philosophical schools that are the main subject of his work.

    King starts by giving an overview of the origins and nature of Hindu Philosophy, and then compares and contrasts, with enough historical context to enable the reader to discern the interrelationships between, six major schools of Hindu thought - the Purva Mimamsa, Uttara Mimamsa (Vedanta), Vaisesika, Nyaya, Samkhya, and classical Yoga. He then highlights salient points of Buddhist thought in the Abhidharma and Mahayana traditions. Following these overviews he then covers Ontology, Epistemology, Perception, Consciousness and the Body, and Creation and Causality, comparing and contrasting the various schools and again highlighting their historical interrelationships.

    I found this book to be a worthwhile read.

    James Corrigan
    An Introduction to Awareness