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ePub War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the Great War (The Greater War) download

by John Horne,Robert Gerwarth

ePub War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the Great War (The Greater War) download
Author:
John Horne,Robert Gerwarth
ISBN13:
978-0199654918
ISBN:
0199654913
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 12, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1926 kb
Fb2 file:
1908 kb
Other formats:
rtf mobi doc mobi
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
903

War in Peace explores the differences and similarities between these . The First World War did not end in November 1918. Robert Gerwarth was born in Berlin and educated at Oxford where he also held a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship.

War in Peace explores the differences and similarities between these various kinds of paramilitary violence within one volume for the first time. It thereby contributes to our understanding of the difficult transitions from war to peace. In Russia and Eastern Europe it finished up to a year earlier, and both there and elsewhere in Europe it triggered conflicts that lasted down to 1923.

The first book that systematically addresses post-war violence in Europe after 1918 within . Anne Dolan: The British Culture of Paramilitary Violence in the Irish War o. .

The first book that systematically addresses post-war violence in Europe after 1918 within the confines of one volume

The First World War did not end in November 1918. War in Peace explores the differences and similarities between these various kinds of paramilitary violence within one volume for the first time

The First World War did not end in November 1918. War in Peace explores the differences and similarities between these various kinds of paramilitary violence within one volume for the first time. It also helps to re-situate the Great War in a longer-term context and to explain its enduring impact.

War in Peace explores the differences and similarities between these various kinds of paramilitary violence within one . Paramilitary formations were prominent in this.

War in Peace offers a valuable look not only at the 'war after the war' but also on the nature of paramilitary .

War in Peace offers a valuable look not only at the 'war after the war' but also on the nature of paramilitary conflict, and the origins of fascism and collaborationism. Irish university professors Gerwarth & Horne have gathered thirteen essays on paramilitary conflicts across much of Europe in the aftermath of the political and geographic changes that came out of World War I. After an introduction that gives us an overview of these movements – Freikorps, Fasci di combattimento, Reds and the Whites in Russia, Finland, Hungary, Austria, and other countries – and how they influenced.

The First World War did not end in November 1918

The First World War did not end in November 1918. In Russia and Eastern Europe it finished up to a year earlier, and both there and elsewhere in Europe it triggered conflicts that lasted until 1923.

Robert Gerwarth and John Horne. Paramilitary formations were prominent in this continuation of the war. They had some features of formal military organizations but were used in opposition to the regular military as an instrument of revolution or as an adjunct or substitute for military forces when these were unable by themselves to put down a revolution (whether class or national).

The First World War did not end in November 1918. In Russia and Eastern Europe it finished up to a year earlier, and both there and elsewhere in the world it triggered conflicts that lasted down to 1923. Paramilitary violence was an important ingredient in the clashes unleashed by class revolution in R The First World War did not end in November 1918.

War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the Great War - The . The First World War did not end in November 1918

War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the Great War - The Greater War (Paperback). Indeed, the book eloquently demonstrates the inadequacy of other histories of Europe that concentrate on West European experiences in that it shows how events in Central and Eastern Europe are integral parts of the continent's past, not aberrations to a Western norm.

Extra-Legal Militancy in Post-Great War Europe.

The First World War did not end in November 1918. In Russia and Eastern Europe it finished up to a year earlier, and both there and elsewhere in Europe it triggered conflicts that lasted down to 1923. Paramilitary formations were prominent in this continuation of the war. They had some features of formal military organizations, but were used in opposition to the regular military as an instrument of revolution or as an adjunct or substitute for military forces when these were unable by themselves to put down a revolution (whether class or national). Paramilitary violence thus arose in different contexts. It was an important aspect of the violence unleashed by class revolution in Russia. It structured the counter-revolution in central and Eastern Europe, including Finland and Italy, which reacted against a mythic version of Bolshevik class violence in the name of order and authority. It also shaped the struggles over borders and ethnicity in the new states that replaced the multi-national empires of Russia, Austria-Hungary and Ottoman Turkey. It was prominent on all sides in the wars for Irish independence. In many cases, paramilitary violence was charged with political significance and acquired a long-lasting symbolism and influence. War in Peace explores the differences and similarities between these various kinds of paramilitary violence within one volume for the first time. It thereby contributes to our understanding of the difficult transitions from war to peace. It also helps to re-situate the Great War in a longer-term context and to explain its enduring impact.
  • A summary of the review on StrategyPage.Com

    'Irish university professors Gerwarth & Horne have gathered thirteen essays on paramilitary conflicts across much of Europe in the aftermath of the political and geographic changes that came out of World War I. After an introduction that gives us an overview of these movements – Freikorps, Fasci di combattimento, “Reds” and the “Whites” in Russia, Finland, Hungary, Austria, and other countries – and how they influenced the rise of fascism, militarism, and even the racist militia auxiliaries of the Nazis on the Eastern Front in the Second World War. The individual essays cover various aspects of these paramilitary conflicts, some indistinguishable from outright war and some more like sporadic terrorism – in Russia, Ukraine, the Baltic states, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Italy, Finland, the Balkans, Turkey, Poland, Ireland (both British and Irish), and France. The editors oddly omit Czechoslovakia, saying it “experienced little or
    no paramilitarism” (p. 16), a matter likely disputable by Sudetens, Magyars, Jews, and Carpatho-Rusyns. Despite this, "War in Peace" offers a valuable look not only at the “war after the war” but also on the nature of paramilitary conflict, and the origins of fascism and collaborationism.'

    For the full review, see StrategyPage.Com

  • A good collection of works on the paramilitarism that spread across Europe, a fine look at at areas of the conflict often ignored in English works in favor of the Western Front and a strong rebuttal to views of World War I really 'ending' in 1918 when the violence unleashed continued for years longer.

    The only real criticism is the continued lack of a Kindle version for more convenient transport and reading.