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ePub Digital Filmmaking: The Changing Art and Craft of Making Motion Pictures download

by Thomas Ohanian,Natalie Phillips

ePub Digital Filmmaking: The Changing Art and Craft of Making Motion Pictures download
Author:
Thomas Ohanian,Natalie Phillips
ISBN13:
978-0240802190
ISBN:
0240802195
Language:
Publisher:
Focal Press; 1 edition (April 11, 1996)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1673 kb
Fb2 file:
1372 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
758

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Digital Filmmaking book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Digital Filmmaking: The Changing Art and Craft of Making Motion Pictures. by. Thomas A. Ohanian

Digital Filmmaking has been called the bible for professional filmmakers in the digital age. It details all of the procedural, creative . by Michael E. Phillips and Thomas A. Ohanian.

Digital Filmmaking has been called the bible for professional filmmakers in the digital age. It details all of the procedural, creative, and technical aspects o. . It details all of the procedural, creative, and technical aspects of pre-production, production, and post-production within a digital filmmaking environment. It examines the new digital methods and techniques that are redefining the filmmaking process, and how the evolution into digital filmmaking can be used to achieve greater creative flexibility as well as cost and time savings.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Digital Filmmaking: The Changing Art and . Used-like N : The book pretty much look like a new book.

Used-like N : The book pretty much look like a new book. There will be no stains or markings on the book, the cover is clean and crisp, the book will look unread, the only marks there may be are slight bumping marks to the edges of the book where it may have been on a shelf previously. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Ohanian, Thomas . hillips, Michael . igital Filmmaking: The Changing Art And Craft Of Making Motion Pictures. Boston : Focal Press, 1996. These citations may not conform precisely to your selected citation style. Please use this display as a guideline and modify as needed.

Thomas Ohanian, Natalie Phillips.

43 20. Personal Name: Ohanian, Thomas A. Publication, Distribution, et. Boston Includes bibliographical references (p. 257) and index. Personal Name: Phillips, Michael E. Rubrics: Cinematography Digital video. Download now Digital filmmaking : the changing art and craft of making motion pictures Thomas A. Ohanian, Michael E. Phillips ; cover art by Jeffrey Krebs. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format. It details all of the procedural, creative, and technical aspects. ByThomas Ohanian, Natalie Phillips. First Published 2000. eBook Published 3 April 2013. Pub. location New York.

By: Thomas Ohanian; Natalie Phillips.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781136053535, 1136053530. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780240804279, 0240804279. By: Thomas Ohanian; Natalie Phillips. Publisher: Routledge. Print ISBN: 9780240804279, 0240804279.

Digital Filmmaking: The Changing Art and Craft of Making Motion Pictures. Phillips. This book details the procedural, creative, and technical aspects of preproduction, production, and. From the Publisher: Digital Filmmaking is the professional "bible" of the new era in filmmaking. This book details the procedural, creative, and technical aspects of preproduction, production, an. More). Ohanian, Hans C.

Digital Filmmaking is the professional ¦bible¦ of the new era in filmmaking. This book details the procedural, creative, and technical aspects of preproduction, production, and post-production within a digital filmmaking environment. Readers will understand not only what new digital methods and techniques are redefining the filmmaking process, but also how the evolution into digital filmmaking can be used to achieve greater creative flexibility as well as cost and time savings. Digital Filmmaking: The Changing Art and Craft of Making Motion Pictures thoroughly explains vital concepts, including digitization, compression, digital compositing, nonlinear editing, and on-set digital production and relates traditional film production and editing processes to those of digital techniques.By far the most comprehensive book on the subject, Digital Filmmaking details how each stage of the traditional filmmaking process is being augmented by digital processes. Featuring interviews with leading filmmakers, including James Cameron and George Lucas, this book details how today's filmmakers are using digital techniques to enhance their creativity and to realize their imaginations.Thomas A. Ohanian has worked on award winning commercials, documentaries, feature films, and television shows during his 17 years as an editor. A 1993 Emmy winner for the co-invention of the Avid Media Composer, a digital nonlinear editing system, he is also a winner of a 1994 Academy Award for Scientific and Engineering Achievement from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Mr. Ohanian lectures extensively on digital nonlinear production and post-production techniques, is a visiting editor at The Edit House, and the author of Digital Nonlinear Editing (Focal Press).Michael E. Phillips owns and operates The Edit House in Boston, a digital post-production facility that offers the latest technology to independent filmmakers. He has served as digital editing consultant for the Columbia released film The Professional. He is also the film production specialist for Avid Technology where he helped develop the Film Composer; for which he was the co-recipient of the 1994 Academy Award for Scientific and Engineering Achievement from the Academy of Motion Pictures and Sciences. In 1987, Mr. Phillips was a winner at the New England Film Festival with his film The Chair. Features interviews with leading filmmakers including James Cameron and George LucasThe most comprehensive book on the subject of digital filmmaking.
  • I found the audience for this book to be elusive. It appears to be aimed at those currently working in major film industry centers on one hand and then at the enthusiast with a digital camcorder on the other. Someone currently working in film-in whatever capacity-probably knows considerably more than is presented in this book. The enthusiast with a camcorder will learn a little, but much of the material assumes a level of knowledge that he may not have.
    My background is in sound, both production and video post, and running a recording studio the 70s. I then migrated into computers. About five years ago I started getting back into multimedia via web audio and video. I have some clients who want to produce movies using 24p for distribution via film and was hoping to get a view of current industry practice. This book only lightly touches on current technical practice and is incomplete in this area. I have shot some 24p and almost all of my experieence with cvamera work is digital. The information on digital technology is incomplete and in some cases inaccurate and the information on originating on video and finishing on film is trivial.
    While a few of the interviews are good, most just occupy space and a few are fatuous. Much of the material is dated-such as the interview with Larry Blake, and the references to DNLE (today there are only digital Non Linear Editors). This second edition appears to be some minor material plastered onto the first edition. The first edition was aparently from some time in the middle 90s. The bright spot of the book is an excellent description and explanation of 3:2 pulldown.
    Overall I found this book very disapointing.

  • The Second Edition was published April 2000 and has a considerable amount of material about 24p and transferring DV or HDTV to 35mm motion picture footage. It is also an invaluable guide at gaining some insight into the changing world of film making.

  • This fabulous book is a must for anyone considering shooting a project on digital video or HDTV. Timely issues are addressed, such as what happens when you shoot video (approx. 30fps) and then transfer to film (24fps). One of the chapters is titled, "24p: Twenty-Four Frames, Progressively Scanned." 24p and video was a major issue at the NAB Convention (National Association of Broadcasters) last April.  The book describes the new digital frontier, and also takes time to review traditional film making process. Also, rather than just deal with digital cameras and nonlinear editing, Ohanian and Phillips also take a look at digital technology uses in other areas of film such as storyboard and costume design. There is even a section on the use of Storyboard Quick and an industry viewpoint with Storyboard Quick's co-developer, Paul Clatworthy writing about the future of digital previsualization. These highlighted areas, called "Industry Viewpoints" create compelling interest throughout each chapter where industry experts such as editor Pietro Scalia (JFK-Academy Award for best editing) contribute much insight.Will film editing and other traditional film methods become obsolete is a question the book addresses. The authors point out the many innovations that editors have achieved, moving from film to digital video editing, such as the method of "cheap telecine." Here, the editor uses the conventional flatbed film editor modified to include a CCD camera. Rather than spend thousands transferring at a facility, the editor simply transfers with his flatbed and then edits on an Avid or other nonlinear system. This is so much faster than film editing.Digital Consultant Van Ling points out that "like in many fields, it (digital technology) can be easy to fall into the temptation of the technological imperative it that if the technology is out there, you should be using it or you'll be behind the times." He continues, stating that filmmakers need to focus on "weaving a good yarn." The authors stress that "adoption of a new methodology or a new technology must take into account two issues: 1) does the new way decrease the cost of getting the film into distribution, or 2) is there a different benefit, such as increased creativity?" Any filmmaker who knows how to harness the digital technology with taste and creativity so the story telling is enhanced will be the successful storyteller.The second edition looks at industry standard programs such as Movie Magic Budgeting and unveils many unique features. Digital technology has influenced today's film making from script, budget, storyboarding, and costume design programs to the way the film or digital video is shot. The Director of Photography often has his laptop near the camera with storyboards loaded. Many camera operators now wear on their belt a BE Logger which is a wireless time code reader. The logger detects camera starts and stops for automatic logging of takes. The unit display indicates camera roll, scene, take, time code start, time code out, duration of take and other factors. After a days shooting, the unit is plugged into a master logging software program where all events and attributes are easily manipulated. For instance, it can tell an Avid editor where to cue to a particular scene. Many other digital aids to production are described in the book.What might be of most interest to film makers is the aspect of shooting on digital video or HDTV and transferring the final product to 35mm motion picture film for theatrical release. The authors cover this topic thoroughly by looking at many different avenues to shoot and methods of film transfer, including interviews with lab and sound professionals. The various aspects of conversion and quality of the sound track is expertly covered. This is now a very popular way for independents to produce features for about $100,000. Most theaters don't have digital projectors yet so this section of the book will be very valuable to a producer who is contemplating digital to film as a method of production.Included in the book is a lengthy discussion of the Association of Independent Commercial Editors (ACE) in June 1999.  A full transcript of the event with streaming audio is available at [...] This book should be required reading for those in the industry and will be an invaluable reference for upcoming productions.

  • Foundational and updated to the state of Industry evolution

  • Written like a bad stereo manual and padded with self-serving industry interviews, this title was an in-house product of Avid Press, and an unabashed commercial for their system as it existed at the turn of the century. Just one chapter was devoted to HD, with nothing useful about how to actually shoot in this medium, and there was no coverage of DV moviemaking either. The book was targeted towards Hollywood industry types who planned to shoot on 35 mm film, digitize their footage, and rent an expensive Avid editing suite for all post-production. Even Avid has had to rethink their business model in the intervening years, as competitors have offered more affordable software for desktop computers. Unless you just want an historical journey through obsolete editing systems, don't waste half a c-note on this book...

  • While the writing sytle and the overall style of the book seems to ramble, there's actually a whole lot of very important technical information being covered in this book.
    It's reassuring to me to have industry specialists writing a technical book as well as interview other working professionals. While the 1st edition might seem a little dated, the 2nd edition includes more information on 24P HD, among other things. The film information is very thorough and well-explained, and that's not usually the case! The same is true for the various audio issues to consider both in the field and in post. It's also one of the few books that provides information on the use of film timecode.