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ePub My Heart My Mother: Death and Rebirth in Ancient Egypt download

by Alison Roberts

ePub My Heart My Mother: Death and Rebirth in Ancient Egypt download
Author:
Alison Roberts
ISBN13:
978-0952423317
ISBN:
0952423316
Language:
Publisher:
Northgate Publishers (December 31, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1237 kb
Fb2 file:
1993 kb
Other formats:
azw rtf mobi txt
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
311

One advantage Alison Roberts has, though: She is not interpreting ancient Egyptian religion as sex hostile, something many modern mystics attempt to due to a post-Egyptian development of a sex hostile meme pool in religion

One advantage Alison Roberts has, though: She is not interpreting ancient Egyptian religion as sex hostile, something many modern mystics attempt to due to a post-Egyptian development of a sex hostile meme pool in religion. Yet, the bottom line is: If you do not take the phenomenological approach of mysticism towards ancient Egyptian religion and society, you are bound to blind both as polytheistic, pagan and utterly unconcerned with I-n-I (us) today.

My Heart My Mother book. My Heart My Mother looks at many different aspects of Egyptian religion from the role of Hathor-Sekhmet, the serpent eye goddess, in the cult of Osiris, to the reliefs in the temple at Abydos, and more general discussions of temple life, ancestor ritual, death, rebirth and regeneration.

Hathor Rising: The Secret Power of Ancient Egypt by Alison Roberts (Paperback, 1995). Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. History: World & General.

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Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Robert McCormick, Alison Fox, Patrick Carmichael, Richard Procter. My Heart My Mother: Death and Rebirth in Ancient Egypt. Категория: religion, ancient history.

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Alison Roberts - My Heart My Mother: Death and Rebirth in Ancient Egypt. Alison Rowlands - Witchcraft and Masculinities in Early Modern Europe (Palgrave Historical Studies in Witchcraft and Magic). Читать pdf. Alison Robins - Mentoring in the Early Years.

Explores the pivotal place of the fiery serpent-eye goddess, Hathor-Sekmet, in the mysteries of Osiris, the Egyptian god of the dead. This book shows Seti I's temple at Abydos to be an image of heaven, built to correspond with the cosmic 'maps' of living and dying depicted on the remarkable Nut ceilings in Theban royal tombs.

My Heart My Mother looks at many different aspects of Egyptian religion from the role of Hathor-Sekhmet, the serpent eye goddess, in the cult of Osiris, to the reliefs in the temple at Abydos, and more general discussions of temple life, ancestor ritual, death, rebirth and regeneration. An original piece of work on female divinities and their role in the passage of the pharaohs from death to rebirth that takes us beyond the New Kingdom period and into the Greco-Roman world.
  • An excellent book! Highly recommended!

  • This book is a follow-up to Roberts' earlier book, Hathor Rising, about feminine divine power in ancient Egypt. Whereas that book focused on the early New Kingdom, this one discusses the Ramesside period (the latter half of the New Kingdom) and the role that female deities played in the complex afterlife beliefs found in funerary texts from the period.

    The book doesn't focus very closely on its subject. It discusses a loosely connected variety of subjects, such as the Memphite Theology (centering on the male god Ptah), on the assumption that it was a product of the Ramesside period, and the rites performed at Abydos for Osiris. In both those cases Roberts points out the role of the relevant female deities, but when she does so it feels like something of an afterthought. The latter half of the book is better, as it has a built-in thematic structure: the journey of the sun god through the underworld as described in the funerary texts.

    The last couple of chapters discuss alchemy, one of many esoteric traditions that arose in Greco-Roman times and were influenced, to varying degrees, by ancient Egyptian religion. She points out similarities between alchemical traditions and the transfiguration of the soul in Egyptian afterlife beliefs. In particular, she compares the transformation of the sun god in the Book of the Earth, in which the fiery Eye goddess seems to play a role, to the way metalworking and crucibles are depicted in other Egyptian sources. These similarities are interesting, but they don't seem strong enough by themselves to prove a direct connection. More detailed study is needed. As Roberts herself points out, scholars increasingly acknowledge the Egyptian background to another esoteric tradition, Hermeticism, but they haven't reexamined alchemy yet.

    This book and its predecessor do give a sense of how female deities fit into ancient Egyptian beliefs. As much as Roberts wants to emphasize goddesses, though, it feels as if femininity was a major undercurrent in Egyptian theology rather than a central feature. Osiris and Ra were the agents of resurrection, even if Isis, Nut, and Hathor played large supporting roles. Things changed in the Late and Ptolemaic periods, even if Hathor herself was overshadowed by Isis, but Roberts can't cover that subject because she limits her scope to the New Kingdom. And because of the rather unfocused writing style, one has to pick out the nuggets of information related to the goddesses, rather than getting a coherent summary of the subject. For that reason, I think these two books are best used as supplements to other works on the Egyptian concept of femininity, such as Dancing for Hathor and, if you can find it, Patterns of Queenship in Ancient Egyptian Myth and History.

  • I read the original print of 2000. Alison Roberts clearly prefers to remain on the safe side of egyptology, which concentrates on the myths and rites of ancient Egypt, but excludes the mysticism. At one point, she even laments about that focus in "scholarly" books and goes as far as stating that at least some use of the so called "Book of the Dead" was for an initiation for the very much living. Yet, without the full scale mysticism behind the myths and rites, ancient Egypt cannot get overstood. But then again, this is true for any religion. Yet, any religion is largely practiced - and therefore very real - by the masses to which no mysticism is taught or for whom (quasi universal) mysticism don't say anything. Hence, it gets difficult to rate this book. Clearly, orthodox egyptologists will give more stars than mystics of any branch of religion. As I am a mystic, I would probably give 2 or 3 stars for the first four chapters or 188 pages. However, I bought this book for its final fifth chapter or 36 pages. Which is about the ancient Egyptian source of European alchemy. And here the author leaves the orthodox path for a more progressive view, clearly and very convincingly connecting e.g. the "Splendor Solis" paper to the "Book of Night" and other ancient Egyptian mystic works. The very term "alchemy" shows the Arab origin of "chemistry". Yet, they in turn got it from the Egyptians, and the Jews actually bridged it to Europe as well. Originally not being concerned at all with secular science, but with a lot of spirituality. Which does get explained in this book, minus the very most of mysticism as mentioned. For that connection to overstand, it makes sense to have read the previous chapters in the book. That's why to me personally, this book is worth 4 stars after all.

    For those with general interest in all of the book: The title may be a bit misleading as it suggests a much broader spectrum than gets actually covered. The author recommends reading her previous book Hathor Rising: The Power of the Goddess in Ancient Egypt beforehand. Which is about Akhenaten's (Akenten's) revolution. "My Heart My Mother" concerns itself with the "aftermath" (or counter revolution depending on the perspective). Obviously, the author isn't to fond of Akhenaten, mostly for his supposed neglect of female input in his religion branch. (Again, which may due to the author not having a vibe for mysticism, which disregards genders. Akhenaten and his wife are usually depicted in an "androgynous" style.) Yet, Alison Robert's focus narrows further on one temple in Memphis and the Osireion at Abydos. Speaking of which, she uses the orthodox English rendered Greek rendered names of the ancient Egyptian names of god(desse)s and cities.

    One of the MANY, MANY examples of the ancient Egyptian branch of religion not to be overstood by reading this non-mystical book is about Seth (Set) killing Osiris (Asar) "for some unstated reason". It isn't about the literal myth, but the symbolism: Seth represents the lower self of everyone which believes in the ego and separations, who hence separates and destructs as in the myth he separates Osiris' body into many pieces. Accordingly, it is besides the point to write about one episode of Seth and his nephew Horus (Heru) as an homosexual encounter and about another with Isis (Aset) and Horus as an incestuous one. Again, the symbolism of what the characters (who are all the ONE, plus all parts of the initiate) stand for is decisive, not the specifics of the exchangeable myth. Besides: All ancient Egyptian deities are meant to be androgynous and all sexuality is more or less incestuous, as couples are often siblings etc. For a mystical approach read e.g. Shamanic Wisdom in the Pyramid Texts: The Mystical Tradition of Ancient Egypt and Muata Ashby's books, for direct reference for example "African Religion Vol. 3: Memphite Theology".

    One advantage Alison Roberts has, though: She is not interpreting ancient Egyptian religion as sex hostile, something many modern mystics attempt to due to a post-Egyptian development of a sex hostile meme pool in religion.

    Yet, the bottom line is: If you do not take the phenomenological approach of mysticism towards ancient Egyptian religion and society, you are bound to blind both as polytheistic, pagan and utterly unconcerned with I-n-I (us) today. Instead of seeing the very source of all of today's "world religions" and the very relevance in mystical terms.

  • Really well done book. I needed this for research and found everything I wanted. Highly recommended.