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ePub Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction download

by Jonathan Culler

ePub Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction download
Author:
Jonathan Culler
ISBN13:
978-0192853837
ISBN:
019285383X
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; New Ed edition (June 15, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1988 kb
Fb2 file:
1114 kb
Other formats:
docx txt lrf azw
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
535

Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction. Patricia Waugh, University of Durham.

Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction. Jonathan Culler has always been about the best person around at explaining literary theory without oversimplifying it or treating it with. Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction is an exemplary work in this genre. J. Hillis Miller, University of California, Irvine.

Literary Theory book. These questions and more are addressed in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction, a book which steers a clear path through a subject which is often perceived to be complex and impenetrable.

Jonathan Culler is Class of 1916 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Cornell University

Jonathan Culler is Class of 1916 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Cornell University. He is past president of the American Comparative Literature Association and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Bottom line: Culler’s introduction is now, primarily, a historical document, but it is a very good one, one that not only identifies the players and their ‘schools’ (acknowledging that the outlines of such entities are often vague). He even includes some clever and instructive cartoons (without noting, in passing, that Theory’s practices are often conducive to such representations).

These questions and more are addressed in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction, a book which steers a clear .

These questions and more are addressed in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction, a book which steers a clear path through a subject which is often perceived to be complex and impenetrable.

These are some of questions addressed by Jonathan Culler in this Very Short Introduction .

These are some of questions addressed by Jonathan Culler in this Very Short Introduction to literary theory.

;What is Literary Theory? Is there a relationship between literature and culture? In fact, what is Literature, and does it matter? These are the sorts of questions addressed by Jonathan Culler in a book which steers a clear path through a subject often perceived to be complex an. .

;What is Literary Theory? Is there a relationship between literature and culture? In fact, what is Literature, and does it matter? These are the sorts of questions addressed by Jonathan Culler in a book which steers a clear path through a subject often perceived to be complex and impenetrable.

Jonathan Culler (born 1944) is Class of 1916 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Cornell University; his published works are in the fields of structuralism, literary theory and criticism. Culler attended Harvard for his undergraduate studies, where he received a Bachelor of Arts in history and literature in 1966.

Culler’s contribution to the Very Short Introductions series, "Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction’’, has received praise for its innovative technique of organization. Rather than dedicate chapters to schools and their methods, he divides into eight chapters the issues and problems that literary theory approaches. In a book recently published in 2007, "The Literary in Theory", Culler responds to the greater notion of Theory and the history of literature’s role in the larger realm of literary and cultural theory.

What is literary theory? Is there a relationship between literature and culture? In fact, what is literature, and does it matter? These questions and more are addressed in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction, a book which steers a clear path through a subject which is often perceived to be complex and impenetrable. Jonathan Culler, an extremely lucid commentator and much admired in the field of literary theory, offers discerning insights into such theories as the nature of language and meaning, and whether literature is a form of self-expression or a method of appeal to an audience. Concise yet thorough, Literary Theory also outlines the ideas behind a number of different schools: deconstruction, semiotics, postcolonial theory, and structuralism, among others. From topics such as literature and social identity to poetry, poetics, and rhetoric, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction is a welcome guide for anyone interested in the importance of literature and the debates surrounding it.About the Series: Combining authority with wit, accessibility, and style, Very Short Introductions offer an introduction to some of life's most interesting topics. Written by experts for the newcomer, they demonstrate the finest contemporary thinking about the central problems and issues in hundreds of key topics, from philosophy to Freud, quantum theory to Islam.
  • Whoever at Oxford Press designed this excellent book has done the author a great disservice in choosing an 8-pt. type size for the text. I was involved in design and typography for over 30 years and in my opinion, unless you have close to 20/20 vision you might have a bit of a problem.

    Aside from that, the book is a great read. Chapter 2 alone--"What is Literature and Why Does if Matter?"--is worth the purchase. If this paperback came with a pair of readers, I'd give it 5 stars. If there's a hardcover version, I hope it has a larger format, the content is more than worth the consideration.

  • Already own a copy and have used in my English classes. Great break down for a novice, in theory. I especially like the "identity" unit. Have modified and taught it over and over to all levels and grades of high school students, who are fascinated with themselves and want to learn how their "identity" develops and continues to evolve. The theories are easy to grasp and . . . relevant. [Connections in various works of literature.] I also used this unit for my MA in English. The unit was an excellent source, for the Multicultural Literature course. Hot topic and timeless . . . Culler does a great job, in a concise little handbook.

  • As usual, Jonathan Culler does an excellent job explaining complex theoretical concepts so the reader may clearly understand what literary theory is, how it is done, how to apply it to both literary texts and literary criticism and everything else in life. The book is witty, insightful and illuminating. On reading it I have finally understood that literary theory is not necessarily a self contained corpus of doctrines aiming at deciding what literature is but rather a never ending practice, interdisciplinarian in nature, that helps us in making sense of our life and experience through our interaction with literature and culture. I think I can fairly claim that I now have a better understanding of what is "the literary" in literature and any other cultural discourse and practice thanks to this book.

  • I have a Master's degree in Literature and when it came time for my requisite literary theory courses, they were taught in the driest, most pretentious, disconnected from reality way possible. So much so that I decided that the academic study of literature was for people who wished to escape reality and deny their responsibility as citizens of a troubled populace. This small book reaffirmed my love for the study of literature, albeit years after my life has taken other turns. Cullers, rather than simply defining and describing the different schools of literary criticism (which was what I bought the book expecting), approaches the material with the questions of "what does it mean to read?" and "what makes literature distinct from other forms of expression?" With a historical perspective and an ear for how people have used rhetoric and literary devices over time, this is a short, but fascinating explanation of why the study of literature is relevant. Perhaps there are better, more comprehensive books out there, but until I read those, this one is worth 5 stars!

  • The fact that literary theory is often referred to as just 'theory' should alert the newcomer to its amorphous and unfocused nature. It is no longer concerned just with literature, but with every aspect of culture and experience. It is a theory of theories, a post-modernist stocktaking of the western intellectual tradition.

    Culler traces several paths through this boundless philosophical landscape. Seven such paths actually, exploring aspects of language, identity and meaning. These constitute as gentle an introduction as is possible. In fact, it is difficult to imagine a better guide than Culler, with his clear and elegant style and his breadth of knowledge. Although this is not a conventional school-by-school primer, there is a section at the end briefly summarizing the major schools, from Russian Formalism to Queer Theory (yes, you heard right). The author advises that you can read these summaries before, after, or during the main text. I recommend leaving them until after, when they will be a lot more meaningful. Otherwise, they might frighten you off from reading the text itself.

    The illustrations consist of a half-dozen or so vaguely relevant cartoons. I suppose, as this series is illustrated, OUP felt obliged to include something, even if the text had no need of it. More positively, this book is blessedly free of the typos that normally bedevil the series.

    If you wish to 'dip your toe in the water' of literary theory (and be warned, it is a maelstrom) Culler's book is the perfect place to do it.

  • I'm not a literary scholar, but was interested in "theory"; I was familiar with Wittgenstein, had read a book on Roland Barthes and been fascinated, and I love words and signs. This little book was more than I could have asked for. Without being in college and without some professor to guide me along, I would have had no hope of understanding what the topic even "was".

    This sort of thing is not for everybody, I understand. And, others have criticized that this book does a fine job of introducing "theory" but does almost nothing to explore various major "schools" of theory. I'm fine with that; I got all I needed right here, and I have a solid enough foundation to move on should I choose to.

    The author, Culler, is a great writer; his Introduction to Roland Barthes book was fabulous too. It was my search for other works by Culler that lead me to this.

  • I am a law student looking to take up the serious study of literature in my free time. I chose this book in the hopes that it would help me develop some tools for literary analysis. Really this book exists at a higher level than my intended purpose, but I am thrilled that I stumbled upon it. This is really a book about how modern thinking influences and has influenced modern literature. A truly exciting experience.