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ePub Martin Heidegger download

by George Steiner

ePub Martin Heidegger download
Author:
George Steiner
ISBN13:
978-0226772325
ISBN:
0226772322
Language:
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (September 25, 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1780 kb
Fb2 file:
1319 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
511

All in all, Steiner's book is the best introduction to this influential thinker. My field is Comparative Literature, not Philosophy, and I feel as though I learned a tremendous amount by reading this book

All in all, Steiner's book is the best introduction to this influential thinker. My field is Comparative Literature, not Philosophy, and I feel as though I learned a tremendous amount by reading this book. If you only read one introduction to Heidegger, this monograph should be it.

Martin Heidegger book. With characteristic lucidity and style, Steiner makes Heidegger's. It would be hard to imagine a better introduction to the work of philosopher Martin Heidegger. -George Kateb, The New Republic.

by. Steiner, George, 1929-. Heidegger, Martin, 1889-1976. Chicago : University of Chicago Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

It would be hard to imagine a better introduction to the work of philosopher Martin Heidegger.

Martin Heidegger (Paperback). George Steiner (author). Acquaintance with the work of Martin Heidegger is indispensable to an understanding of contemporary thought and culture. His work has had a profound influence on a number of disciplines, including theology, Sartrean existentialism, linguistics, Hellenic studies, the structuralist and hermeneutic schools of textual interpretation, literary theory, and literature itself. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

In Martin Heidegger, George Steiner delves into the life and work of the prolific German philosopher. Written with Steiner’s trademark eloquence and precision, Martin Heidegger is the seminal look at the man and his groundbreaking ideas-the perfect study for scholars, Heidegger fanatics, and curious readers alike

In Martin Heidegger, George Steiner delves into the life and work of the prolific German philosopher. Written with Steiner’s trademark eloquence and precision, Martin Heidegger is the seminal look at the man and his groundbreaking ideas-the perfect study for scholars, Heidegger fanatics, and curious readers alike. Biographies Nonfiction

With characteristic lucidity and style, Steiner makes Heidegger's immensely difficult body of work accessible to the general reader. In a new introduction, Steiner addresses language and philosophy and the rise of Nazism. "It would be hard to imagine a better introduction to the work of philosopher Martin Heidegger."—George Kateb, The New Republic
  • To read George Steiner is to bask in the presence of a great intellectual mind at work. The popular French frauds so à la mode today seem determined to instill nothing more than doubt, but I have always believed that clarity of thought (which does not preclude doubt) is what makes a critical text like Steiner's monograph on Heidegger valuable. Derrida merely muddies the water (as Nietzsche would say), but Steiner puts you in touch with one of the most obscure, difficult, and significant philosophers of the 20th century.

    This is a short book, but it is slow reading. Not because of jargon-riddled wordplay, but because Steiner takes the time to untangle Heidegger's neologisms and strange, poetic language. Indeed, the first half of the book is titled "Basic Terms," an understanding of which will enable the reader to follow what Heidegger is trying to say about existence, authentic being, etc.. Steiner puts Heidegger's works into historical context and explains his methodology. To wit, Heidegger truly believes that we are spoken through language, so his philosophizing takes the form of etymologizing, going back to the origins of words, and recovering what can help us to think Being. According to Steiner, we never do get to defining Being, but the journey is rich and the effort is worthwhile.

    Heidegger wants to overcome Western Metaphysics, which has been determined by Plato (who privileges the noumenal realm of ideas over the phenomenal world we live in) and Aristotle (who objectifies the natural, phenomenal world by subjecting it to study). Both strategies have left us without the ability to listen to or open ourselves up to Being, to standing in awe before its mystery.

    Steiner also elucidates Heidegger's notion of authenticity (accepting that we are beings-toward-death), and his belief that anxiety, guilt, and care are inherent to authentic being. Why is this? Because we are both beings-in-the-world and beings-in-time. Death, for Heidegger, "is not an event; it is a phenomenon to be understood existentially," a process, part of our becoming. There is something extremely liberating in this notion, and both Heidegger and Steiner are aware of it. Angst, or existential anxiety, is not something to be eliminated with facile religious beliefs, counseling, or psycho-pharmaceuticals; it is to be understood as the mark, the indication of a being striving to live authentically, embracing fate (that which has been sent to a being-in-the-world).

    Because we are beings-in-the-world we must also be beings that care: care about what others think of us; care about our world; and care for others. Steiner develops this idea as it is revealed in Heideggers' works, and he also addresses the issue of his involvement with Nazism. How does one reconcile caring, commitment, and concentration camps?

    Recognizing that we are still too close to the Holocaust to be dispassionate, Steiner nonetheless attempts to understand this facet of Heidegger's life. Steiner is neither persecutorial nor apologetic. And he is much more disturbed by what was not said than by what was. Why, he asks repeatedly, was Heidegger silent about Europe's "season in Hell" after the war? Steiner has a difficult time getting past this, but does not belabor the issue. Heidegger's works are indeed part of the spirit of the times, the zeitgeist, and have certain affinities with Nazi ideology. But Steiner is unable to conclude that Heidegger was an anti-Semite; there does not seem to be enough convincing evidence for that. But still, why the silence?

    All in all, Steiner's book is the best introduction to this influential thinker. My field is Comparative Literature, not Philosophy, and I feel as though I learned a tremendous amount by reading this book. If you only read one introduction to Heidegger, this monograph should be it.

  • I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to be introduced to the work of Martin Heidegger.
    It is eloquently written, has clarity in its expression, and is approachable by the reader who has not read philosophy systematically.
    In addition, Steiner addresses in a remarkable way Heidegger's relationship with Nazism, and his "silence" after the Second World War.
    Overall, it is not an easy read, but the best way to get introduced to Heidegger's work.

  • Thanks for your excellent service. The book was in great shape. I will treasure it. Price was great too. I am absolutely satisfied.

  • Oh my. Is there another book as impenetrable but essential? Tolerating the paradoxes here is both driving me crazy and feeding my soul.

  • Martin Heidegger is the most systematic of existentialists. His most important book,Being and Time(1927), is a study of the special peculiarities of human existence. For most European philosophers man is essentially a rational animal, a spectator of the world that is set over against him and in pursuit of knowledge about it. For Heidegger,man is pre-eminently an active being, immersed in the world, which is given a form only by his active preoccupations. It is man’s special fate to keep creating himself by decisions based on the possibilities open to him. He may try to escape from this by ‘inauthenticity’, the strategy of living only in accordance with routine or habit, the attempt to imitate a mere thing, or merge with the ‘theyness’ of others. For authentic living, what is necessary is the resolute confrontation with death, the annihilation that inspires metaphysical anxiety. Heidegger extracts a large dramatic potential from his truly initially abstract subject matter. He then turned from human existence to the mystery of being in general, a nebulous topic which he pursued in poetic meditations and by long excursions into etymology. He often welds ‘language into a kind of violent ordinariness’(Steiner). For him man was a “being-in-the-world”.

    Steiner thinks that Heidegger failed to arrive at a suitable definition of Being in his attempt to cancel 2000 years of Christianity and excavate the sense of wonder open to the pre-Socratic Greeks. In the interregnum between the two world wars there had been an outpouring of philosophy, theology and poetics. Heidegger’s Being and Time is an attempt to overthrow traditions of metaphysical philosophy and the developments of science and technology, which were a by-product. There is a sense of renewal of language, of compressed word combinations, due to Heidegger’s attempts to return to forgotten sources, like an archaeologist excavating the truth. He uses imagery of forests and ‘paths in the clearing’, man as the ‘witness’ or ‘shepherd of being’. Heidegger expressed hatred of technological and industrial civilization. Steiner is evidently impressed by Heidegger, but felt you could replace 'Sein' by God in all the key passages, and then their meaning becomes clear. Steiner is troubled by Heidegger’s silence post-1945 about his Nazism, National Socialism, and has nothing to say about the holocaust. He concedes he’s a great philosopher, but a small man. Heidegger’s thought abstains from ethics in its purchase on Being and its flight from logic. The great tautologies of his philosophy went hand in hand with inhumanity.