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ePub Lloyd Hamilton: Poor Boy Comedian of Silent Cinema download

by Anthony Balducci

ePub Lloyd Hamilton: Poor Boy Comedian of Silent Cinema download
Author:
Anthony Balducci
ISBN13:
978-0786441594
ISBN:
0786441593
Language:
Publisher:
McFarland (May 13, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1302 kb
Fb2 file:
1579 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
403

Lloyd Vernon Hamilton (August 19, 1891 – January 19, 1935) was an American film comedian, best remembered for his .

Lloyd Vernon Hamilton (August 19, 1891 – January 19, 1935) was an American film comedian, best remembered for his work in the silent er.

Lloyd Hamilton: Poor Boy Comedian of Silent Cinema, By Anthony Balducci. A History of the Hal Roach Studios, By Richard Lewis Ward. Stardust and shadows: Canadians in early Hollywood, by Charles Foster. The theater and cinema of Buster Keaton by Robert Knopf. This film is dangerous:a celebration of nitrate film. Gill, David, Brownlow, Kevin (1987).

Preference and similarity data were obtained for male and female subjects judging male and female cinema actors

Preference and similarity data were obtained for male and female subjects judging male and female cinema actors. Preference judgements were assumed to be an example of primarily affective judgement, similarity was. assumed to be mainly cognitive.

Today is the birthday of comedian Lloyd Hamilton (1891-1935). The film is now lost, but historian/author Anthony Balducci has made a study of the screenplay and over 100 production stills for his book Lloyd Hamilton: Poor Boy Comedian of the Silent Cinema (2009). According to Balducci, A Self Made Failure is one of those melodrama comedies, striving constantly for pathos, and lacking in gags. Ham plays a tramp who is the adopted father of an orphan (shades of The Kid).

At first glance, Lloyd Hamilton was simply a large, baby-faced comic who wore a checkered cap and walked like a duck. Beyond the surface, however, Hamilton had much more to offer than an iconic look and persona. In his performances, Hamilton demonstrated keen timing and an inventive mind, providing humor rich in both emotion and self-observation for a career that spanned over 20 years

18 COMEDIANS OF SILENT FILM by Anthony Balducci. It's a shame because I am a big fan of Lloyd Hamilton and the only book on that great comedian is also written by this same author.

18 COMEDIANS OF SILENT FILM by Anthony Balducci. I had been anticipating this being a 5 star book. A book on the unsung heroes of the silent comedy era is a topic dear to my heart. What does Big Boy look like? Well we have to rely on the author's telling us what he looks like as he is another without an image of some kind. In fact now that I am leafing back through the book, I would say that MOST of the comics are not represented with a photo.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Lloyd Hamilton : poor boy comedian of silent cinema Anthony Balducci. Book's title: Lloyd Hamilton : poor boy comedian of silent cinema Anthony Balducci. This explores Hamilton's life and work, beginning with his childhood through the comic's entry into show business as a theatre extra, his most memorable role as half of silent comedy's "Ham and Bud" duo, and his first feature film, The Darker Self. The author examines Hamilton's private life and alcoholism" Provided by publisher.

Anthony Balducci studied journalism at Baruch College and holds a University of Florida criminology degree. He lives in New Port Richey, Florida. Библиографические данные.

Shorty Hamilton was an American actor and silent film comedian who appeared in more than 80 films, mostly westerns, from . Lloyd Hamilton: Poor Boy Comedian of Silent Cinema, p. 6, . 009 Anthony Balducci. "The Deadly Battle at Hicksville".

Shorty Hamilton was an American actor and silent film comedian who appeared in more than 80 films, mostly westerns, from 1909 to 1925. His birth name was William John Schroeder, and he was also known as "Jack Hamilton. He had served in the United States Cavalry for several years and worked as a cowboy in Montana and Texas. He was best known for the "Adventures of Shorty" series of two-reel silent films that were released from 1912 to 1917.

At first glance, Lloyd Hamilton was a large, baby-faced comic who walked like a duck. To the trained eye, Hamilton demonstrated keen timing and an inventive mind, providing wry humor rich in emotion during his 20 year career. Perhaps most importantly, Hamilton was greatly admired by his fellow comics, receiving praise from the likes of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. This book explores Hamilton's life and work, beginning with his conservative, middle-class childhood and continuing through the comic's entry into show business as a theatre extra, his most memorable role as half of silent comedy's "Ham and Bud" duo, and his first feature film, The Darker Self. The author examines Hamilton's private life and alcoholism and the decline of his health and career, which led to his death at the age of 43. The book includes exclusive photographs from the Hamilton family, a filmography with detailed plot descriptions, many behind-the-scenes facts, and an analysis of Hamilton's critical lost feature film A Self-Made Failure.Self-Made Failure".
  • This is an intriguing biography of little-seen but great movie comedian. Lloyd Hamilton has been called a "comedian's comedian" because many great comedians like Buster Keaton considered Hamilton to be among the very best. Comedian/director Charley Chase (1893-1940), who directed a few Hamilton films later said that in determining his own comedic performance, he would ask himself, "how would Ham do this?".

    The author has done extensive research to find out as much as possible about this fairly obscure comedian who died a long time ago. Most of his films are not known to exist, and very little was written about him for many years afterward, so it is difficult to find much information about the man and the making of his films. Anthony Balducci's biography gives us as much of a complete story of Lloyd Hamilton as possible at this late date, and it is good to have this book. I am glad that I bought it.

  • I really do appreciate the attempt to write a book on a comic that is almost completely forgotten. Information on Hamilton's life must have been very hard to uncover. What is here is fascinating.
    I have not seen a lot of the films mentioned here and I believe not many people have.
    Therefore, the author's plot synopsises are more valuable than such things would be in a book on, for example, Charlie Chaplin.
    However, here is where the book is a bit weak. The writing style is a bit forced and reading the many plot descriptions tends to get a bit trying.
    Also, the book is a McFarland and very pricey.
    Thus the missing 5th star.
    Hamilton did live a very tragic and extremely interesting life and this is the only book that anyone will ever write on this excellent comic so I do recommend adding it to your silent comedy library.

  • Lloyd Hamilton is one of the great enigmas of the cinema. Hugely popular in the silent era, he came closer than Harry Langdon, Charley Chase or Fatty Arbuckle to joining the pantheon of greats, Chaplin, Keaton and Harold Lloyd. Yet today he is practically forgotten and his films are hard to find. For decades, nothing much was known about this pioneer--who started in films before any in the pantheon--except that he was great, and then he wasn't. Anthony Balducci spent decades researching Hamilton, in the process turning up virtually every fact available on the comedian, yet he remains an enigma. This is not the fault of Balducci, who should be cheered in the streets for his efforts and perseverance, but simply the fact that there is not much extant about this one-time comedy powerhouse. The breadth of Balducci's research, particularly into Hamilton's films, is stunning, yet Hamilton himself remains an enigmatic figure. He was a clown with a distinctive style--a rather babyish fellow in an adult world--who was highly regarded by his peers (Balducci points out that both Chaplin and Keaton were fans), and that rare silent performer who made the transition to sound with ease, yet there is so much that isn't known about the man. Hamilton's career seems to have been damaged, if not torpedoed, by a fondness for alcohol, but there is so much of the story that remains vague. Balducci's foreword describes how Hamilton's descendents were not always cooperative in the course of the project (though they seem to have provided many wonderful photos), which meant the author had to piece together the life of this unique performer as best he could. And he does as well as anyone possibly could. But there is so much left unknown about Lloyd Hamilton that it remains frustrating for the reader...and probably even more frustrating for the laudable author!

  • You may have a hard time running into someone who knows about silent (and also sound!) comedian Lloyd Hamilton on the street, but you may not have to struggle as much to find someone who knows about a performer inspired by Hamilton. This is only one of the things which author Anthony Balducci is able to confirm in his book LLOYD HAMILTON: POOR BOY COMEDIAN. During a period of research which lasted for about thirty years, Balducci not only managed to get hold on rare newspaper and magazine articles about the comedian as well as studio records, but also interviewed several people who knew Lloyd personally, including family members. What ultimately came out of this process is a study of the comedian's life and work which nobody, I dare say, ever could have imagined likely to be written.

    Lloyd Hamilton first reached stardom when he teamed up with Bud Duncan in a series of one-reelers produced by Kalem from 1915 on and a couple of years forward. (Lloyd was in his twenties at the time, but looked considerably older due to heavy makeup and a walrus-moustasche.) While Balducci admits that far from all of these early films have aged flatteringly, and that Lloyd, in fact, later on came to publicly dismiss the often rough and unsophisticated humor which they provided, the author is able to analyze them fairly, taking their historical context into consideration. One of the many things that surprised me, was to learn that Lloyd, in fact, even during the Ham and Bud-years was considered quite a celebrity; while not as respected as Chaplin at this point, he was a popular subject for interviews early on. Several of his statements quoted in this book should be of interest to any aspiring comedian, as Lloyd talks about his wish to make more sophisticated, human comedy. The comedian did a step forward in this regard when he joined Sunshine Comedies (around 1918), where he was under the direction of old-timer Henry Lehrman, and permitted to appear more on his own. However, the major change occurred when Hamilton made his entrance in his first comedies at Mermaid, where he cooperated with some excellent directors such as Charley Chase, and developed his own, distinct comic personality. Now without makeup and heavy moustasches, Lloyd created a character which was his own invention, without any obvious "borrowings" from other performers. While his character shared Chaplin's outsider-appeal to a degree, his soul was much less graceful and alert, making him into a somewhat tragic type. But boy, did he make it funny.

    It has been suggested that Hamilton's own life somewhat reflected the frustrations and unhappiness which his screen character frequently experienced. This point of view may be accurate at least in part; the last chapters in the book make for sad reading, as Hamilton underwent two bitter divorces and was becoming a heavy drinker, resulting in him losing his house and, for a time, his career. Hamilton's films had become more indifferent by the end of the silent era. However, this is far from a "misery biography;" the author pays equal attention to Lloyd's earlier, happier years, when the comedian was being praised as "the next Chaplin." Furthermore, he is able to dismiss several myths that have come to affect the general view on Hamilton in retrospect; for instance, contrary to what everyone (myself included) believed previously, it was not Hamilton's indirect involvement in a fight where a boxer was murdered that had him banned from film for a year, but a combination of his divorce-battles and alcoholism. Balducci also argues that while Hamilton has been accused of often having turned to violence when drunk, several of the accusations made against him should be taken with a grain of salt. Perhaps most interesting of all is Balducci's coverage of Hamilton's two feature films; while none of these films are known to exist in their entirety today, the author provides a convincing analysis as to why the comedian failed to gain much success beyond the two-reel comedy format.

    With his book POOR BOY COMEDIAN, Anthony Balducci has done a great favor both to fans of silent comedy as well as Lloyd Hamilton himself. Now, if someone would please release more of his films on DVD...