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ePub Sabbath and Synagogue: The Question of Sabbath Worship in Ancient Judaism (Religions in the Graeco-roman World) download

by Heather A. McKay

ePub Sabbath and Synagogue: The Question of Sabbath Worship in Ancient Judaism (Religions in the Graeco-roman World) download
Author:
Heather A. McKay
ISBN13:
978-9004100602
ISBN:
9004100601
Language:
Publisher:
Brill Academic Pub (August 1, 1994)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1869 kb
Fb2 file:
1460 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
456

Sabbath and Synagogue book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Sabbath and Synagogue book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Sabbath and Synagogue: The Question of Sabbath Worship in Ancient Judaism (Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, 122) (Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, 122) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Series: Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, Volume: 12. Sabbath worship as a communal event does not feature in the Hebrew Bible.

Series: Religions in the Graeco-Roman World, Volume: 122. Author: Heather A. McKay. In the context of the first century CE, according to Philo and Josephus, the sabbath gatherings took place only for the purpose of studying the law, and not for the liturgical recital of psalms or prayer. Classical authors depict Jews spending the sabbath at home. Jewish inscriptions provide no evidence of sabbath-worship in prayer-houses ( proseuchai), while the Mishnah prescribes no special communal sabbath activities.

Sabbath worship as a communal event does not feature in the Hebrew Bible. Series: Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 122. File: PDF, 2. 6 MB. Читать онлайн. In the context of the first century AD, according to Philo and Josephus, the sabbath gatherings took place only for the purpose of studying the law, and not for the liturgical recital of psalms or prayer. Jewish inscriptions provide no evidence of sabbath-worship in prayer-houses ("proseuchai"), while the Mishnah prescribes no special communal sabbath activities. Part of the Religions in the Graeco-Roman World Series). Sabbath and Synagogue Vol. 122 : The Question of Sabbath in Ancient Judaism.

Religions in the Graeco Roman World, Sabbath and Synagogue The Question of Sabbath Worship in Ancien.

Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy. Daniel J. Harrington & Heather A. Judaism in Philosophy of Religion. Was the Synagogue a Place of Sabbath Worship Before 70?

Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy. Journal of the American Oriental Society 116 (2):295 (1996). This article has no associated abstract. categorize this paper). Was the Synagogue a Place of Sabbath Worship Before 70?

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The Jewish Sabbath in the Roman World up to the Time of Constantine the Great' . Sabbath and Synagogue: The Question of Sabbath Worship in Ancient Judaism. Egyptian religion in the Greco-Roman period.

The Jewish Sabbath in the Roman World up to the Time of Constantine the Great', Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt II 19. Jan 1979. Goldenberg, R. (1979). The Jewish Sabbath in the Roman World up to the Time of Constantine the Great', Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt II 1., 414- 447. A Day of Gladness: The Sabbath among Jews and Christians in Antiquity. Onomastics in Greco-Roman Egypt.

Heather A. McKay, Sabbath and Synagogue: The Question of Sabbath Worship in Ancient Judaism (Religions in the . McKay, Sabbath and Synagogue: The Question of Sabbath Worship in Ancient Judaism (Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 122; Leiden: Brill, 1994), 1. rossRefGoogle Scholar. 20. Susan Ackerman, Warrior, Dancer, Seductress, Queen: Women in Judges and Biblical Israel (ABRL 17; New York: Doubleday, 1998), 25. oogle Scholar. Hector Avalos, Illness and Health Care in the Ancient Near East: The Role of the Temple in Greece, Mesopotamia, and Israel (HSM 54; Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1995), 33.

Some Main First Century Christian Groups  Marcionites: Jesus is solely divine  Jewish Adoptionist: Jesus is human  Gnostics: Jesus a teacher about deliverance from material existence  Proto-orthodox: Jesus is both human and divine GRAECO-ROMAN RELIGIONS: THE THIRD LEG OF THE STOOL . Matthew’s polemic is vicious because Rabbis were expelling Jesus followers from synagogues and denouncing Christians to Roman authorities, so Matthew’s community was experiencing persecution by Jews.

Sabbath worship as a communal event does not feature in the Hebrew Bible. In the context of the first century CE, according to Philo and Josephus, the sabbath gatherings took place only for the purpose of studying the law, and not for the liturgical recital of psalms or prayer. Classical authors depict Jews spending the sabbath at home. Jewish inscriptions provide no evidence of sabbath-worship in prayer-houses (proseuchai), while the Mishnah prescribes no special communal sabbath activities.The usual picture of Jews going on the sabbath to the synagogue to worship thus appears to be without foundation. It is even doubtful that there were synagogue buildings, for 'synagogue' normally meant 'community'.The conclusion of this study, that there is no evidence that the sabbath was a day of communal Jewish worship before 200 CE, has far-reaching consequences for our understanding of early Jewish-Christian relationships.
  • Too often, we are led to accept the conclusions of scholars and experts without analyzing source data. Dr. McKay does us all a favor by actually showing us the source data on the synagogue activities of Jews on the Sabbath in the eastern Mediterranean up to 200 CE. Her detailed analysis of the data is reasonably solid with only a few minor hiccups.

    In eight well organized chapters, she reveals the key evidence found in (1) The Hebrew Bible, (2) Early Jewish Literature, (3) Philo and Josephus, (4) Graeco-Roman Non-Christian Sources, (5) New Testament, (6) Early Christian Sources, (7) The Mishnah, and (8) Archaeological Data, Inscriptions, and Papyri. The ninth and final chapter reiterates her conclusions of the evidence.

    This book aptly calls into question centuries of widely held assumptions of Sabbath and synagogue activities in the general New Testament period. Future studies of ancient Sabbaths and synagogues will certainly be citing McKay's painstaking work. Her work also has implications for the study of early Christian assemblies as well, even though she does not discuss those implications.

    Her conclusion? On the Sabbath, the typical Jewish synagogue did not have a "worship service." There is no unequivocal evidence of non-priestly Jews performing communal prayer, singing, or ritual activity in synagogues (aka proseuchai). The only regular activity is the reading and discussion of the Jewish scriptures.

    Don't believe it? Read the evidence. It's in the book.

  • So far it is an interesting book. This book is definately a different spin on the subject. Can't wait till I have time to read it all the way through.