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by Greg Robinson

ePub By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans download
Author:
Greg Robinson
ISBN13:
978-0674011182
ISBN:
067401118X
Language:
Publisher:
Harvard University Press; Revised edition (May 30, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1205 kb
Fb2 file:
1437 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
391

Much of the late 20th and early 21st century writing on the internment of Japanese take a view of righteous indignation regarding the internment. That makes perfect sense from a distance of 50 or more years.

Racial fear emerges - War abroad, suspicion at home - FDR's decision to intern - Implementing an undemocratic policy - Covering a retreat - Equal justice delayed - President of all the people?

Racial fear emerges - War abroad, suspicion at home - FDR's decision to intern - Implementing an undemocratic policy - Covering a retreat - Equal justice delayed - President of all the people? Includes bibliographical references (p. -310) and index

The Japanese-Americans there, the report claimed, were fiercely loyal to Tokyo and the majority of them would . FDR initiated a secret study in 1941 on Japanese Americans.

The Japanese-Americans there, the report claimed, were fiercely loyal to Tokyo and the majority of them would prove disloyal to the . Japanese ships put in at Hawaii and some of the sailors from the ships had relatives among the local residents. A Midwestern Republican businessman named Curtis B. Munsen headed the study, using a number of special agents. The results of his study were very positive in relation to the Japanese Americans

FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans. Robinson traces FDR’s outlook back to his formative years, and to the early twentieth century’s racialist view of ethnic Japanese in America as immutably foreign and threatening

FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans. Robinson traces FDR’s outlook back to his formative years, and to the early twentieth century’s racialist view of ethnic Japanese in America as immutably foreign and threatening. These prejudicial sentiments, along with his constitutional philosophy and leadership style, contributed to Roosevelt’s approval of the unprecedented mistreatment of American citizens. His hands-on participation and interventions were critical in determining the nature, duration, and consequences of the administration’s internment policy.

Amid the numerous histories and memoirs devoted to this shameful event, FDR's contributions have been seen as negligible

Together, Chinese Americans and Taiwanese Americans represent the largest ethnic group of Asian . A cross-cultural study of Japanese and American children has examined the development of awareness about syllables and phonemes.

Together, Chinese Americans and Taiwanese Americans represent the largest ethnic group of Asian Americans.

FDR looked forward to these biweekly rituals, which were a notable innovation of the Roosevelt White House. The atmosphere was informal and lively. Japanese Americans and World War II: Exclusion, Internment, and Redress By Donald Teruo Hata; Dominguez Hills; Nadine Lshitani Hata Harlan Davidson, 1995. Concentration Camps on the Home Front: Japanese Americans in the House of Jim Crow By John Howard University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Get our daily newsletter. In America, this happened, of course, at a time of national outrage, and of real, if unrealistic, fear that Pearl Harbour was the prelude to a Japanese invasion.

Robinson traces FDR's outlook back to his formative years, and to the early twentieth century's racialist view of ethnic Japanese in America as immutably "foreign" and threatening.

On February 19, 1942, following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor and Japanese Army successes in the Pacific, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed a fateful order. In the name of security, Executive Order 9066 allowed for the summary removal of Japanese aliens and American citizens of Japanese descent from their West Coast homes and their incarceration under guard in camps. Amid the numerous histories and memoirs devoted to this shameful event, FDR's contributions have been seen as negligible. Now, using Roosevelt's own writings, his advisors' letters and diaries, and internal government documents, Greg Robinson reveals the president's central role in making and implementing the internment and examines not only what the president did but why.

Robinson traces FDR's outlook back to his formative years, and to the early twentieth century's racialist view of ethnic Japanese in America as immutably "foreign" and threatening. These prejudicial sentiments, along with his constitutional philosophy and leadership style, contributed to Roosevelt's approval of the unprecedented mistreatment of American citizens. His hands-on participation and interventions were critical in determining the nature, duration, and consequences of the administration's internment policy.

By Order of the President attempts to explain how a great humanitarian leader and his advisors, who were fighting a war to preserve democracy, could have implemented such a profoundly unjust and undemocratic policy toward their own people. It reminds us of the power of a president's beliefs to influence and determine public policy and of the need for citizen vigilance to protect the rights of all against potential abuses.

  • After reading, Hotel at the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, also purchased from Amazon.com, we wanted to understand more about the internment of the Japanese during World War 2. The book, By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans, provides a well documented look at the period before, during and after the adminstration's decision to remove Japanese American citizens and aliens from the West Coast. The book has extensive footnotes that reference the Roosevelt Administration's struggle over the necessity, legality, and political motivation of the Presidential Order. The book presents an inside look at the various cabinet, military and political advisors providing the President with their particular points of view through letters, meeting minutes, newspaper articles, etc. It is a well written book and one that I found hard to put down.

  • One of several books about the internment of Japanese Americans from the Pacific West coast during World War II. The focus here is on the political side, particularly the actions and responses of FDR in issuing Executive Order 9066. Much of the late 20th and early 21st century writing on the internment of Japanese take a view of righteous indignation regarding the internment. That makes perfect sense from a distance of 50 or more years.

    What sometimes is missed in these books, including this one, is the historical context within which this order was made. This isn't an excuse for the order -- it was clearly unconstitutional -- but in 1944 the Supreme Court said it was constitutional. Historical context.

    It took until 1988 -- more than 45 years after the Executive Order for Congress (and President Reagan) to officially acknowledge and apologize for this action. That it took so long in part has to do with the historical context involved.

  • The book was actually a version from the editor. It had several mistakes, the binding was damaged so that pages were loose and the book was broken down the center. It was in pretty bad condition even for a used book.

  • Great piece on Order 9066 and a current protective of FDR. Very eye opening and a great insight on a forgotten piece of American history.

  • Few Americans remember that in Winter 1942, weeks after the Japanese attack on the U.S. Navy at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, officers of the U.S. Army rounded up American citizens of Japanese ancestry on the Pacific coast and sent them to internment camps on the orders of President F.D. Roosevelt (Executive Order 9066, 2/19/42). The order never said "Japanese", but it was directed towards the Issei , the first generation resident aliens who mostly arrived before 1907 and were forbidden by law to become citizens; the Nisei, the American born citizens of the second generation; and the Kibei, those Nisei who had been sent back to Japan for school. J. Edgar Hoover (FBI) said it was unnecessary as did Atty General Biddle. But Secretary of War Stimson advocated an "evacuation" and confiscation of Japanese American property. This is a fascinating book by Professor Robinson, which attempts to show that FDR himself took an active part in this order, and had his own anti-Japanese motives, both from his accumulated experience in the Navy, the Rape of Nanking, his sense of Japan as a rival, his family's great affection for China (Grandpa Warren Delano lived in Guanzhou), and his friendships with Captain Nomura, O. Matsukatam, and R. Asano. Whether or not you end up agreeing with the author's thesis, I still recommend this book as an excellent POLITICAL history of the period and the players, including the Federal Reserve (I had never heard of the Alien Land Act of 1913)

  • `By Order of the President' is a book that attempts to show how involved Franklin D. Roosevelt was in the internment of a group of Americans during World War II (more specifically, the Americans whom ancestrally came from Japan). The book starts out by detailing FDR's youth and pre-presidential opinions of the Japanese portion of the American population, as well as his position on the Japanese of Japan's population. It then proceeds to present the events that led to the internment and how the president contributed to the process. After the preliminary details on internment, Robinson goes on to bring forth facts and information in accordance with the continuation and eventual dismemberment of the internment as well as Roosevelt's involvement in the process.
    Robinson's work presents many facets of popular and unpopular interpretations of FDR's involvement in the events leading to, and beginning the internment - as well as presenting details as to why each opinion is in existence. His book notably allows the reader to see into the meetings and investigations that went into the original initiation of the internment, as well as the misinterpretations and lies that led to the ongoing existence of internment. Robinson sets out to show the true circumstances and events surrounding the prosecution and incarceration of the so-called Japanese American population as well as the involvement of the president in the matter, who seems to have actually been in support of the internment.
    The book presents its literary style in a very attractive manner and will keep the reader involved, despite the fact that the author does seem to use commas a bit excessively. Despite the title of the book, however, the book mostly centers on the positions and deliberations of the president's advisors - something that needs to be presented, but is focused on exceedingly in this case. Nevertheless, the factual evidence about FDR that Robinson does present is compelling and is demonstrative of the true nature of FDR. The facts are largely presented in such a way as not to force an opinion on the reader, but rather to allow the reader to come upon their own conclusions - a writing style that is seemingly growing rarer with every passing year.
    Overall, `By Order of the President' is a work that should not go ignored and which presents the opinions of the president on internment, as well as how these opinions led to the internment of Americans under the pretext that they were dangerous due to their ancestry. Robinson presents a pleasing literary style and I personally look forward to any future publications by the author. The book is therefore highly suggested for anyone interested in Franklin D. Roosevelt, civil rights, American history, or the World War II era in general.