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ePub Cities That Shaped the Ancient World download

by John Julius Norwich

ePub Cities That Shaped the Ancient World download
Author:
John Julius Norwich
ISBN13:
978-0500252048
ISBN:
0500252041
Language:
Publisher:
Thames & Hudson; 1 edition (November 11, 2014)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1838 kb
Fb2 file:
1128 kb
Other formats:
docx txt doc lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
662

In a book of this sort, the first consideration is the choice of cities which will be included

Arranged geographically into five sections, Cities That Shaped the Ancient World takes a global view, beginning in the Near East with the earliest cities such as Ur and Babylon, Troy and Jerusalem. In Africa, the great cities of Ancient Egypt arose, such as Thebes and Amarna. In a book of this sort, the first consideration is the choice of cities which will be included. It is clear that the preponderance of cities is from the Middle East and Europe.

This book provides a very basic overview of a few cities that shaped the ancient world. However, their selection is quite biased.

Almost all of the two page essays are written by academics with archaeological experience of the sites. Only two of the 30 contributors fall into the as seen on television category. This book provides a very basic overview of a few cities that shaped the ancient world. In Asia, the only ones who apparently matter are in China and India.

Great cities marked the earliest development of civilization. From the world's first true cities, in Mesopotamia, to the spectacular urban centres of the Maya in Central America, the places described here represent almost three millennia of human history, society and culture. Arranged geographically into five sections, each with an introduction by John Julius Norwich, Cities That Shaped the Ancient World takes a global view, beginning in the Near East with the earliest cities such as Ur and Babylon, Troy and Jerusalem

The cities of the ancient world built the foundations for urban life today.

The cities of the ancient world built the foundations for urban life today. Cities That Shaped the Ancient World takes a global tour, beginning in the Near East with the earliest cities such as Ur and Babylon.

Arranged geographically into five sections, Cities That Shaped the Ancient World takes a global view, beginning in. .Tietoja kirjoittajasta. John Julius Norwich has written widely on architecture and music, and has presented some thirty BBC television historical documentaries.

Arranged geographically into five sections, Cities That Shaped the Ancient World takes a global view, beginning in the Near East with the earliest cities such as Ur and Babylon, Troy and Jerusalem.

Books related to Cities That Shaped the Ancient World. Arranged geographically into five sections, each with an introduction by John Julius Norwich, Cities That Shaped the Ancient World takes a global view, beginning in the Near East with the earliest cities such as Ur and Babylon, Troy and Jerusalem

Praise for John Julius Norwich As a historian, Lord Norwich knows what matters. SUMMARY: 'This thrilling book is the first occasion on which early Byzantine history has been rendered both readable and credible' - Independent

Praise for John Julius Norwich As a historian, Lord Norwich knows what matters. SUMMARY: 'This thrilling book is the first occasion on which early Byzantine history has been rendered both readable and credible' - Independent. He writes like the most cultivated modern diplomat attached by a freak of time to the Byzantine court, with intimate knowledge, tactful judgement and a consciousness of the surviving monuments' - Independent.

An illuminating and evocatively illustrated tour of forty of the greatest cities that shaped the ancient world and its civilizations, from China and Mesoamerica to Europe and EthiopiaToday we take living in cities, with all their attractions and annoyances, for granted.

An illuminating and evocatively illustrated tour of forty of the greatest cities that shaped the ancient world and its civilizations, from China and Mesoamerica to Europe and Ethiopia

Today we take living in cities, with all their attractions and annoyances, for granted. But when did humans first come together to live in large groups, creating an urban landscape? What were these places like to inhabit? More than simply a history of ancient cities, this volume also reveals the art and architecture created by our ancestors, and provides a fascinating exploration of the origins of urbanism, politics, culture, and human interaction. Arranged geographically into five sections, Cities That Shaped the Ancient World takes a global view, beginning in the Near East with the earliest cities such as Ur and Babylon, Troy and Jerusalem. In Africa, the great cities of Ancient Egypt arose, such as Thebes and Amarna. Glorious European metropolises, including Athens and Rome, ringed the Mediterranean, but also stretched to Trier on the turbulent frontier of the Roman Empire. Asia had bustling commercial centers such as Mohenjodaro and Xianyang, while in the Americas the Mesoamerican and Peruvian cultures stamped their presence on the landscape, creating massive structures and extensive urban settlements in the deep jungles and high mountain ranges, including Caral and Teotihuacan. A team of expert historians and archaeologists with firsthand knowledge and deep appreciation of each site gives voices to these silent ruins, bringing them to life as the bustling state-of-the-art metropolises they once were. 151 illustrations, 147 in color
  • First of all, this is NOT by John Julius Norwich!

    We have read several of his wonderful books and looked forward to another of them. However ...

    It is a collection of short, and I am sorry to have to say, somewhat shallow essays by disparate professionals of various levels of writing ability, each too short to do justice to its subject.

    We did not finish reading it.

    This was faudulent advertising. We wish we had our money back.

  • A fine survey of ancient cities except for the fact that it is almost a complete reprint (with different type and illustrations) of an earlier book also edited by J.J. Norwich titled "Great Cities in History". The individual chapters are compact and informative but way too brief. This is basically a surface survey buttressed by beautiful color photography.

  • I found this book very interesting and informative.

  • Lush. Gorgeous. A book that brings everything up to date. A handy gazetteer to inspire further research, or simply to answer a few basic questions.

  • I wish that I hadn’t bought this book. I was enticed by the fact that John Julius Norwich is credited as the editor.

    Almost all of the two page essays are written by academics with archaeological experience of the sites. Only two of the 30 contributors fall into the “as seen on television” category. One of whom is Bettany Hughes.

    Bettany Hughes’s essays on Troy, Mycenae and Athens read like something lifted from a television documentary. Award-winning historical novelist she may be but somewhat out of class amongst the other contributors.

    Nearly all of the photographs have been sourced from photo archive libraries and so have been previously published elsewhere. Most are good, none outstanding, and some so mediocre that they wouldn’t pass muster for a pocket tourist guide. There are no city plans.

    Printed and bound in China with the pages sewn together in quires as one would expect from Thames & Hudson.

    I bought the book from The Book Depository (which is owned by Amazon).

    Some, once having tasted, may be encouraged to drink more deeply.

  • This book provides a very basic overview of a few cities that shaped the ancient world. However, their selection is quite biased. In
    Asia, the only ones who apparently matter are in China and India. In the Middle East, we have an article on Babylon written by Joan Oates which qualifies as amateurish, at best. Apparently, she felt it appropriate to cite the Bible in her introduction, while quickly demonstrating that this is a source with which she is FAR from familiar with. In Europe, only the Classical civilizations deserve any mention, and the same is true for Africa, 95% of which goes unrepresented! We've grown to hold Mr. Norwich in high esteem, but it appears that he's sourced out the actual work and research for the book to undergrads. We present Rome, but only through the EXTREMELY myopic lens of the city under the rule of Augustus...nothing before or after his rule, apparently, deserves mention! We have Athens, but ONLY Athens in the Golden Age.

    Lastly, it seems as though the editor went out of his way to enlist a group of "conspirators", who clearly know nothing about Christian theology or history, to espouse separate but equally ignorant views about this religion, as if to intentionally seek out an opportunity to insult people of faith and to misrepresent all of history in that regard as something it very much isn't. One example of this was equating Ephesus's recognition of Mary with that same city's previous WORSHIP of Artemis, saying that they "replaced the worship of one goddess with that of another". And that's just plain ignorant! It espouses the author's (in this case, Stephen Mitchell, but equal blame falls on Norwich!) ignorance as a portrayal of historical fact, and detracts from the whole. The same is true of this book's treatment of Jerusalem, Nineveh, and Babylon. It is difficult to be a rational Christian and make it through this book without being insulted. Because that seems to have been the author's intent, to insult people of faith. If we are willing to accept facts in lieu of legend, we certainly expect supposedly "educated" authors to do better than to GUESS at what it is we believe in!