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ePub The Politics of the Veil (The Public Square) download

by Joan Wallach Scott

ePub The Politics of the Veil (The Public Square) download
Author:
Joan Wallach Scott
ISBN13:
978-0691125435
ISBN:
0691125430
Language:
Publisher:
Princeton University Press; F First Edition edition (October 7, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Humanities
ePub file:
1913 kb
Fb2 file:
1422 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
274

Scott traces the history and politics of veil controversies in France and draws apart intertwined strands, starting with the legacy of racism . Scott's book looks at the politics of the veil in France. The analysis is a bit simplistic. It is written for an American audience.

Scott traces the history and politics of veil controversies in France and draws apart intertwined strands, starting with the legacy of racism from the colonial past. She persuasively argues for the negotiation of cultural and religious differences rather than their negation. This book will be required reading for all those concerned with the integration of Muslims into Western Christian societies. -Beth Baron, author of Egypt as a Woman: Nationalism, Gender, and Politics.

Joan W. Scott's book on the headscarf controversies ( affaires des foulards ) in France over the past two decades is one of the best works of social theory that I have read in recent years.

Joan Wallach Scott, the renowned pioneer of gender studies, argues that the law is symptomatic of France's failure to integrate its former colonial subjects as full citizens. She examines the long history of racism behind the law as well as the ideological barriers thrown up against Muslim assimilation.

Joan Wallach Scott's work essentially is a refutation against the 2004 banning of head The Politics of the Veil. As a history buff and novice political scientist, recently I have been interested in the historical archetype of clash of the civilizations. The Politics of the Veil served to be a great reference in studying the long lived clash of the civilizations, especially the one depicted in The Politics of the Veil, where it is essentially French secularism against Muslims within France.

Joan Wallach Scott (born December 18, 1941) is an American historian of France with contributions in gender history. She is a Professor Emerita in the School of Social Science in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey

Joan Wallach Scott (born December 18, 1941) is an American historian of France with contributions in gender history. She is a Professor Emerita in the School of Social Science in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Scott is known for her work in feminist history and gender theory, engaging post-structural theory on these topics

by Joan Wallach Scott. In 2004, the French government instituted a ban on the wearing of "conspicuous signs" of religious affiliation in public schools.

by Joan Wallach Scott. Though the ban applies to everyone, it is aimed at Muslim girls wearing headscarves. Proponents of the law insist it upholds France's values of secular liberalism and regard the headscarf as symbolic of Islam's resistance to modernity.

Joan Wallach Scott, the renowned pioneer of gender studies, argues that the law is symptomatic of France's failure to integrate its former colonial . The public square book series. Princeton university press. The politics of the veil. Princeton and Oxford. series The Public Square Books related to The Politics of the Veil. series The Public Square. Joan Wallach Scott, the renowned pioneer of gender studies, argues that the law is symptomatic of France's failure to integrate its former colonial subjects as full citizens. Books related to The Politics of the Veil.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. The Politics of the Veil (The Public Square).

Outlawing the veil, even though it was worn by very few students in French public schools, was an 8. .For that reason this book is centered on the politics of headscarf controversies in France-a country whose history I have been studying for almost forty years.

Outlawing the veil, even though it was worn by very few students in French public schools, was an 8 . attempt to enact a particular version of reality, one which in­ sisted on assimilation as the only way for Muslims to become French. There are, of course, insights I offer that have more general application.

In 2004, the French government instituted a ban on the wearing of "conspicuous signs" of religious affiliation in public schools. Though the ban applies to everyone, it is aimed at Muslim girls wearing headscarves. Proponents of the law insist it upholds France's values of secular liberalism and regard the headscarf as symbolic of Islam's resistance to modernity. The Politics of the Veil is an explosive refutation of this view, one that bears important implications for us all.

Joan Wallach Scott, the renowned pioneer of gender studies, argues that the law is symptomatic of France's failure to integrate its former colonial subjects as full citizens. She examines the long history of racism behind the law as well as the ideological barriers thrown up against Muslim assimilation. She emphasizes the conflicting approaches to sexuality that lie at the heart of the debate--how French supporters of the ban view sexual openness as the standard for normalcy, emancipation, and individuality, and the sexual modesty implicit in the headscarf as proof that Muslims can never become fully French. Scott maintains that the law, far from reconciling religious and ethnic differences, only exacerbates them. She shows how the insistence on homogeneity is no longer feasible for France--or the West in general--and how it creates the very "clash of civilizations" said to be at the root of these tensions.

The Politics of the Veil calls for a new vision of community where common ground is found amid our differences, and where the embracing of diversity--not its suppression--is recognized as the best path to social harmony.

  • I sold this book back to the campus book store at the end of the semester and I'm kicking myself for it. I really enjoyed this book and it gave me a fresh understanding to the conflicts around the veil (and its various names and forms). I walked away with an informed stance on this political issue. Yes, this book leans more on the side of "Let them wear it if they want" but it is not overly unbalanced.
    I would recommend this book to anyone who has an active mind in modern politics.

  • Scott could have gone deeper in many areas or added an appendix if she felt that would take her off topic. good entry level book and for non academics.

  • Scott's book looks at the politics of the veil in France. The analysis is a bit simplistic. It is written for an American audience. It is a nice read if you are interested in comparing the American context, but not my recommendation if you want to learn more about the French context on its own.

  • Found this so engaging and interesting. It definitely sheds light and gives an insight to socio-political situation in France.

  • Read this book for a class recently (Politics of Immigration) and it really detailed historically, France's position on immigration and assimilation. Excellent read!

  • The book offers interesting facts...but is a little bit light in my opinion. It lacks depth.

    The seller was great though! Great quality book, received in days...

  • Joan Wallach Scott's thesis is that banning the veil in French schools has only exacerbated the differences and tensions between the French Muslim and French non-Muslim populations. I think she makes a legitimate argument for this contention.

    However in the process of making her case, she manages to systematically bash the French in general for being racist, sexist, colonialist, elitist and probably some other -"ists" I can't remember. No one is spared, neither government officials, nor teachers, nor politicians, nor intellectuals, nor feminists, nor the guys she overheard in the post office.

    Having lived in an Islamist state doesn't impress her either. Check out this passage from page 163:
    "Chahdortt Djavann, whose claim to expertise was her own experience in Iran, offered sensationist tales of women't lack of freedom in Muslim countries (maybe because they are true?)...Djavann stated not only that women were oppressed in "Islamic societies" (her quotes), but also (in terms of colonial attitudes I described in chapter 2) that the separation of the sexes necessarily gave rise to rape and prostitution."

    Okay not only does she dismiss a woman with real experience living in a theocracy, but also accuses an Iranian woman of having colonial attitudes. Maybe if this woman had read about living in Iran in a journal instead of actually having lived there she would have gotten more respect, but oh wait, what am i saying, she blows off all the French intellectuals too.

    Scott never even directly acknowledges (that I could tell) that assimilation is a problem or even desirable. She ends up the book by saying something to the effect that the French need to find a better way to negotiate "being-in-common", whatever that means.

    I would ask her, specifically what she would have the French do?

  • I got what I order Its okay I liked this product. I will used this product for a long time