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ePub The Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism download

by Elaine Draper

ePub The Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism download
Author:
Elaine Draper
ISBN13:
978-0871542908
ISBN:
0871542900
Language:
Publisher:
Russell Sage Foundation (March 24, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Medicine & Health Sciences
ePub file:
1880 kb
Fb2 file:
1235 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
827

As Elaine Draper argues in The Company Doctor, company . But Draper expands the scope of the book-tracing parallel developments in the law, scien. Liability and Responsibility in the Work of Company Doctors. 214. Implications for Society and for Social Policy.

As Elaine Draper argues in The Company Doctor, company doctors are bound by two conflicting ideals: serving the medical needs of their patients while protecting the company's bottom line. Draper analyzes the advent of the corporate physician both as an independent phenomenon, and as an index of contemporary culture, reaching startling conclusions about the intersection of corporate culture with professional autonomy.

As Elaine Draper argues inThe Company Doctor, company doctors are bound by two conflicting ideals: serving the medical needs of their patients while protecting the company's bottom line.

The Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. Risky Business: Genetic Testing and Exclusionary Practices in the Hazardous Workplace. New York: Cambridge University Press; recipient of the Robert K. Merton Book Award, American Sociological Association, Sociology of Science, Knowledge, and Technology, 1993; Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society Book Award, 1993; and 1992 C. Wright Mills Book Award Honorable Mention. Drug Testing in the Workplace.

The Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism, by Elaine Draper.

Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism. Please visit the journal site to read this article. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2003. Stefan Timmermans, "The Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism by Elaine Draper," American Journal of Sociology 110, no. 3 (November 2004): 820-822. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. On the Relation Between Sociology and Ethics. Eviction and the Reproduction of Urban Poverty.

As Elaine Draper argues in The Company Doctor, company doctors are bound by two conflicting ideals: serving the medical needs of their patients while protecting the company's bottom line

As Elaine Draper argues in The Company Doctor, company doctors are bound by two conflicting ideals: serving the medical needs of their patients while protecting the company's bottom line.

Draper E. The Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility and Corporate Professionalism.

These company doctors are bound by two conflicting ideals: serving the medical needs of their patients, while maintaining fiduciary relationships with their employers. Draper E. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation;2003:1–396. 3. Jenkins S, Maese R. NFL medical standards, practices are different than almost anywhere else.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. The Company Doctor : Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism.

To limit the skyrocketing costs of their employees' health insurance, companies such as Dow, Chevron, and IBM, as well as many large HMOs, have increasingly hired physicians to supervise the medical care they provide. As Elaine Draper argues in The Company Doctor, company doctors are bound by two conflicting ideals: serving the medical needs of their patients while protecting the company's bottom line. Draper analyzes the advent of the corporate physician both as an independent phenomenon, and as an index of contemporary culture, reaching startling conclusions about the intersection of corporate culture with professional autonomy. Drawing on over 100 interviews with company physicians, scientists, and government and labor officials, as well as historical, legal, and statistical sources and medical trade association data, Draper presents an illuminating overview of the social context and meaning of professional work in corporations. Draper finds that while medical journals, speeches, and ethical codes proclaim the independent professional judgment of corporate physicians, the company doctors she interviewed often expressed anguish over the tightrope they must walk between their patients' health and the corporate oversight they face at every turn. Draper dissects the complex position occupied by company doctors to explore broad themes of doctor-patient trust, employee loyalty, privacy issues, and the future direction of medicine. She addresses such controversial topics as drug screening and the difficult position of company doctors when employees sue companies for health hazards in the workplace. Company doctors are but one example of professionals who have at times ceded their autonomy to corporate management. Physicians provide the prototypical professional case for exploring this phenomenon, due to their traditional independence, extensive training, and high levels of prestige. But Draper expands the scope of the book―tracing parallel developments in the law, science, and technology―to draw insightful conclusions about changing conditions in the professional workplace, as corporate cultures everywhere adapt to the new realities of the global economy. The Company Doctor provides a compelling examination of the corporatization of American medicine with far-reaching implications for professionals in many other fields.