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ePub Self and Identity: Fundamental Issues (Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity) download

by Richard D. Ashmore,Lee Jussim

ePub Self and Identity: Fundamental Issues (Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity) download
Author:
Richard D. Ashmore,Lee Jussim
ISBN13:
978-0195098273
ISBN:
0195098277
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (May 15, 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Medicine & Health Sciences
ePub file:
1709 kb
Fb2 file:
1299 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
629

Self and Identity book.

Self and Identity book. As the first volume in the Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity, the book sets the stage for a productive second century of scientific analysis and heightened understanding of self and identity. Scholars and advanced students in the social sciences will find this highly informative and provocative reading. Dr. Richard D. Ashmore is a professor and Dr. Lee Jussim is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Self and Identity book

Self and Identity book.

By Richard D. Ashmore, Lee Jussim. For us this is the start of a wonderful and important adventure-the Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity, a biennial symposium-plusbook series devoted exclusively to self and social identity. Self and Identity: Fundamental Issues.

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Series: Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity (Book 3). Paperback: 288 pages. ISBN-10: 9780195137439. ISBN-13: 978-0195137439. Back to top.

Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity. This first volume in the Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity presents a sophisticated and detailed analysis of some of the most fundamental issues facing scholars interested in studying self and identity.

Richard D.

Jussim runs the Social Perception Lab at Rutgers University, Livingston Campus. Social Identity, Intergroup Conflict, and Conflict Reduction (Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity), 2001, Oxford University Press. The lab studies how people perceive, think about, and judge others.

1. General Note: Papers originally presented at the First Rutgers Symposium on Self and Social Identity held at Rutgers University in April 1995. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and indexes. Rubrics: Self Congresses Identity (Psychology).

How might social identity be harnessed in the service of reducing conflict between groups? The chapters in this book present a sophisticated and detailed interdisciplinary analysis of the most fundamental issues in understanding identity and conflict. Categories: Mathematics\Symmetry and group.

Self and identity have been important yet volatile notions in psychology since its formative years as a scientific discipline. Recently, psychologists and other social scientists have begun to develop and refine the conceptual and empirical tools for studying the complex nature of self. This volume presents a critical analysis of fundamental issues in the scientific study of self and identity. These chapters go much farther than merely taking stock of recent scientific progress. World-class social scientists from psychology, sociology and anthropology present new and contrasting perspectives on these fundamental issues. Topics include the personal versus social nature of self and identity, multiplicity of selves versus unity of identity, and the societal, cultural, and historical formation and expression of selves. These creative contributions provide new insights into the major issues involved in understanding self and identity. As the first volume in the Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity, the book sets the stage for a productive second century of scientific analysis and heightened understanding of self and identity. Scholars and advanced students in the social sciences will find this highly informative and provocative reading. Dr. Richard D. Ashmore is a professor and Dr. Lee Jussim is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.