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ePub Vaccination and Control of Aujeszky's Disease (Current Topics in Veterinary Medicine) download

by J.T. van Oirschot

ePub Vaccination and Control of Aujeszky's Disease (Current Topics in Veterinary Medicine) download
Author:
J.T. van Oirschot
ISBN13:
978-0792301844
ISBN:
0792301846
Language:
Publisher:
Springer; 1989 edition (April 30, 1989)
Category:
Subcategory:
Medicine & Health Sciences
ePub file:
1755 kb
Fb2 file:
1942 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.6
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663

Current Topics in Veterinary Medicine. Vaccination and Control of Aujeszky's Disease.

Current Topics in Veterinary Medicine. Anyone interested in Aujeszky's disease or livestock disease control in general, would do well to read this book. D. Paton, The Veterinary Record, March 1990. Current Topics in Veterinary Medicine.

D.

by . existing vaccines against pseudorabies (also termed Aujeszky's disease).

In the United States, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which recommends schedule additions for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recommends routine vaccination of. .The first DIVA vaccines (formerly termed marker vaccines and since 1999 coined as DIVA vaccines) and companion diagnostic tests have been developed by . van Oirschot and colleagues at the Central Veterinary Institute in Lelystad, The Netherlands. They found that some existing vaccines against pseudorabies (also termed Aujeszky's disease) had deletions in their viral genome (among which.

Vaccination has greatly reduced the burden of infectious diseases. Understandably, vaccine safety gets more public attention than vaccination effectiveness, but independent experts and WHO have shown that vaccines are far safer than therapeutic medicines.

Epidemiology and Control of Viral Diseases. Disease Control through Quarantine. Quarantine remains a cornerstone in many animal disease control programs.

PDF The major goals of veterinary vaccines are to improve the health and welfare of companion . trol of Aujeszky’s disease in swine (96); however, the potential.

PDF The major goals of veterinary vaccines are to improve the health and welfare of companion animals, increase production of livestock in .played a major role in successful disease control and eradica-. For example, the virtual eradication of rinderpest virus. for recombination between pseudorabies virus strains has. raised concern (101).

Aujeszky’s Disease – Pseudorabies. Borna virus infection

Aujeszky’s Disease – Pseudorabies. Borna virus infection. Vaccination is intended to protect individuals against disease caused by bacteria and viruses, but also to prevent infection and transmission of the agents within a population. Vaccination coverage - when exceeding ~70% of a population, as shown . by antibody prevalence - leads to herd immunity, which is a safeguard against epidemics. Again, this is usually contained, but it may get out of control, causing a transient cytokine rush with fever, nausea etc. Or even worse: like any chronic inflammation, it can develop into a tumor, as the injection-site fibrosarcomas in cats have shown.

Gene-deleted vaccines (glycoprotein I and/or glycoprotein X) against pseudorabies allowed a DIVA approach and control of Aujeszky's disease in swine (96); however, the potential for recombination between pseudorabies virus strains has raised concern (101).

Current Topics in Veterinar. Possible legislative measures for the control of AD are listed. Vaccination is widely used in this context. oceedings{sD, title {Aujeszky’s Disease}, author {G. Even though latently infected animals can remain in the vaccinated herds, they are not liable to restrictive measures. The problems which result are discussed.

For a full list of topics: All A-Z Topics. Meningococcal disease is an acute, potentially severe illness caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis

For a full list of topics: All A-Z Topics. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. Meningococcal disease is an acute, potentially severe illness caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. Meningococcal vaccination is recommended for persons at increased risk for meningococcal disease, including microbiologists who are routinely exposed to isolates of N. meningitidis, military recruits, and persons who travel to, and . citizens who reside in, countries in which N. meningitidis is hyperendemic or epidemic, particularly countries in the sub-Saharan Africa meningitis belt.

A Seminar in the Community Programme for the Coordination of Agricultural Research, held at the Berlaymont Building, Brussels, Belgium, July 5-6, 1988. Sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities, Directorate General for Agriculture, Coordination of Agricultural Research