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ePub Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite download

by Institute of Medicine,Committee on the Survey of the Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite,David P. Rall,Constance M. Pechura

ePub Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite download
Author:
Institute of Medicine,Committee on the Survey of the Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite,David P. Rall,Constance M. Pechura
ISBN13:
978-0309048323
ISBN:
030904832X
Language:
Publisher:
National Academies Press; 1 edition (February 1, 1993)
Category:
Subcategory:
Medicine & Health Sciences
ePub file:
1105 kb
Fb2 file:
1152 kb
Other formats:
mobi doc mbr azw
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
335

Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on the Survey of the Health . In response, the Veterans Administration asked the Institute of Medicine to study the issue. 8. Ocular Effects of Mustard Agents and Lewisite.

In response, the Veterans Administration asked the Institute of Medicine to study the issue.

The Institute of Medicine was chartered in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to enlist distinguished members of the appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public.

Committee to Survey the Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Institute of Medicine. The Institute of Medicine was chartered in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to enlist distinguished members of the appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public.

4. constance pechura. Press proceed to send the authors a message. Thank You. We have submitted your request - we will update you on status within the next 48 hours.

8 Ocular Effects of Mustard Agents and Lewisite. I. Risk Assessment Considerations for Sulfur Mustard. J. Examination of the Effects of Certain Acute Environmental Exposures on Future Respiratory Health Consequences. List of Acronyms and Abbreviations. 9 Dermatological Effects of Mustard Agents and Lewisite. 10 Other Physiological Effects of Mustard Agents and Lewisite. 11 Relationship of Mustard Agent and Lewisite Exposure to Psychological Dysfunction. 12 Summary of Findings and Recommendations. A. Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee.

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Veterans at Risk book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Veterans at Risk:: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. by. Constance M. Pechura

Veterans at risk: The health effects of mustard gas and lewisite. Occupational health standards have not been established for Lewisite, a potent toxic vesicant which reacts with the sulfhydryl groups of proteins through its arsenic group

Veterans at risk: The health effects of mustard gas and lewisite. Technical Report Pechura, . Occupational health standards have not been established for Lewisite, a potent toxic vesicant which reacts with the sulfhydryl groups of proteins through its arsenic group. The purposes of this study were to determine the reproductive consequences and dose~response of continuing Lewisite exposure of parental males and females and their offspring in a 42-week two-generation study. Solutions of Lewisite were prepared for administration by diluting the neat agent with sesame oil.

by Constance M. Pechura And David P. Rall.

by Institute of Medicine (. Committee to Survey the Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite.

Recently, World War II veterans have come forward to claim compensation for health effects they say were caused by their participation in chemical warfare experiments. In response, the Veterans Administration asked the Institute of Medicine to study the issue. Based on a literature review and personal testimony from more than 250 affected veterans, this new volume discusses in detail the development and chemistry of mustard agents and Lewisite followed by interesting and informative discussions about these substances and their possible connection to a range of health problems, from cancer to reproductive disorders. The volume also offers an often chilling historical examination of the use of volunteers in chemical warfare experiments by the U.S. military--what the then-young soldiers were told prior to the experiments, how they were "encouraged" to remain in the program, and how they were treated afterward. This comprehensive and controversial book will be of importance to policymakers and legislators, military and civilian planners, officials at the Department of Veterans Affairs, military historians, and researchers.

  • Casual interest. Genealogy research for WWII.

  • In WWII the US subjected around 60,000 US servicemen to chemical warfare experiments. The objectives of these experiments was two-fold: improve protection and defense against enemy CW, and comprehend the requirements necessary for an Allied CW retaliation.
    BG Alden Waitt stated in WWII that what the US lacked was something authoratative on CW. These field trials led to the two part report "Tachnical Aspects of Chemical Warfare in the Field" (TACWIF, 1946), and the experience that may have been necessary in response to an Axis CW offensive.
    Unfortunately, these 60,000 servicement were exposed to chemicals that are now known carcinogens at a time when such latent effects were not appreciated. That, on top of the intense security surrounding CW research has resulted in a large body of veterans that had suffered health consiquences without compensation or assistance.
    Veteran's at Risk is a technical report on what those health consiquences are by reviewing the toxicology and medical knowledge on Mustard Gas and Lewisite. It also reviews the technical literature resulting from the WWII field trials and experiments. In the end, the NAS concluded that there was cause to believe that veterns had been adversely affected, and that all documentation from these experiments should be made publically available to assist these veterans.
    The authors do an excellent job of covering the pathology of Mustard Gas and Lewisite. The details of WWII field trials and experiments are also still useful today in comprehending the disposition of vesicant casualties. This book is required reading for anyone anticipating treating vesicant casualties.
    The only faults to the book that I could discern was poor military posology. The authors did not always calculate dosage correctly, and could have revealed more on unit cancer risk for these vesicants. These faults do not by any means take away from the importance of the book - this is just a word of caution on blindly accepting all the figures reported.