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ePub Short-Term Tests for Chemical Carcinogens (Topics in Environmental Physiology and Medicine) download

by H.F. Stich,R.H.C. San

ePub Short-Term Tests for Chemical Carcinogens (Topics in Environmental Physiology and Medicine) download
Author:
H.F. Stich,R.H.C. San
ISBN13:
978-0387904962
ISBN:
0387904964
Language:
Publisher:
Springer; 1981 edition (May 26, 1981)
Category:
Subcategory:
Medicine & Health Sciences
ePub file:
1340 kb
Fb2 file:
1490 kb
Other formats:
mbr rtf doc azw
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
194

New & Forthcoming Titles Topics in Environmental Physiology and Medicine. Titles in this series.

New & Forthcoming Titles Topics in Environmental Physiology and Medicine. New & Forthcoming Titles. Home New & Forthcoming Titles.

The recent surge of interest in designing, validating, and implementing short-term tests for carcinogens has been spurred by the fairly convincing correlation be tween the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chemicals and physical agents and by the assumption that DNA alteration, mutations, and chromosome aberrations are somehow involved in neoplastic transformation.

The recent surge of interest in designing, validating, and implementing short-term tests for carcinogens has been spurred by the fairly convincing correlation be­ tween the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chemicals an. .

The recent surge of interest in designing, validating, and implementing short-term tests for carcinogens has been spurred by the fairly convincing correlation be­ tween the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chemicals and physical agents and by the assumption that DNA alteration, mutations, an. Short-Term Tests for Chemical Carcinogens.

Hans F. Stich, Richard H. C. San, Hugh J. Freeman

Hans F. Freeman. The recent surge of interest in designing, validating, and implementing short-term tests for carcinogens has been spurred by the fairly convincing correlation be­ tween the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chemicals and physical agents and by the assumption that DNA alteration, mutations, and chromosome aberrations are somehow involved in neoplastic transformation. Moreover, it has been tacitly assumed that the mutagenic capacity alone of compounds would induce regulatory agencies to pass rules for their removal from the environment and would lead the public to avoid them.

This meeting has given clear demonstration of the diversity and power of short-term laboratory tests to assess mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. eds) Short-Term Tests for Chemical Carcinogens. Topics in Environmental Physiology and Medicine. Springer, New York, NY.

cle{rmTF, title {Short-term tests for carcinogens and mutagens. 133-226 } }. M. Hollstein, John. Mccann, +1 author Warren W. Nichols.

The recent surge of interest in designing, validating, and implementing short-term tests for carcinogens has been spurred by the fairly convincing correlation be­ tween the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chemicals and physical agents and by the assumption that DNA alteration.

بإمكانك تنزيل كتاب Short-Term Tests for Chemical Carcinogens لقراءته بدون اتصال بالإنترنت .

بإمكانك تنزيل كتاب Short-Term Tests for Chemical Carcinogens لقراءته بدون اتصال بالإنترنت أو تمييز أجزاء منه أو وضع إشارة مرجعية على بعض صفحاته أو تدوين ملاحظات أثناء القراءة. The reluctance to accept wholeheartedly the mutagenicity tests for the detection of carcinogens is partly due to uncertainty about the in volvement of mutations in neoplastic transformation, partly due to the present difficulty of extrapolating results from various endpoints obtained on numerous organisms to man, and partly due to a multitude of complex events that lead in vivo to the evolvement of benign.

Environmental Carcinogens - Science topic. Carcinogenic substances that are found in the environment. Our changing environment, climate, and lifestyle factors are growing concerns in the 21st century

The recent surge of interest in designing, validating, and implementing short-term tests for carcinogens has been spurred by the fairly convincing correlation be­ tween the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chemicals and physical agents and by the assumption that DNA alteration, mutations, and chromosome aberrations are somehow involved in neoplastic transformation. Moreover, it has been tacitly assumed that the mutagenic capacity alone of compounds would induce regulatory agencies to pass rules for their removal from the environment and would lead the public to avoid them. The actual response, however, is quite different. Governmental departments shy away from making any decisions on the basis of in vitro test systems. The public at large is becoming irritated by daily an­ nouncements that many of their cherished habits could adversely affect their health. Industry appears to feel threatened and may reduce its search for new beneficial chemicals. The reluctance to accept wholeheartedly the mutagenicity tests for the detection of carcinogens is partly due to uncertainty about the in­ volvement of mutations in neoplastic transformation, partly due to the present difficulty of extrapolating results from various endpoints obtained on numerous organisms to man, and partly due to a multitude of complex events that lead in vivo to the evolvement of benign or malignant tumors.