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by Fred Hapgood

ePub Up The Infinite Corridor: Mit And The Technical Imagination download
Author:
Fred Hapgood
ISBN13:
978-0201626100
ISBN:
0201626101
Language:
Publisher:
Da Capo Press (January 20, 1994)
Category:
ePub file:
1346 kb
Fb2 file:
1487 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
701

Science writer Hapgood's "infinite corridor"refers both to an architectural feature of the Massachusetts Institute . Hapgood is very effective at creating the atmosphere of life at MIT: it is, above all, intense.

Science writer Hapgood's "infinite corridor"refers both to an architectural feature of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Cambridge campus and to the seemingly endless pathway of progress in applied science so often associated with MI. But it is also quirky, has people who are very bright doing things that are sometimes incomprehensible, and who are headstrong. Fortunately, he explains why this must be so, and he does it well.

Up the Infinite Corridor book. Hapgood takes readers inside the minds of engineers and into the. Hapgood takes readers inside the minds of engineers and into the heart of the engineering profession at technology's Mother Church, MIT-a place teeming with arcane knowledge, bizarre projects, and often even more bizarre undergraduates.

In Up the Infinite Corridor, Fred Hapgood explores the mental landscape of engineering a style of thought, a mode of operation, a particular form of creativity that increasingly defines the trajectory of modern life. With the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as his point of reference, Hapgood traces the emergence of the profession from its mud-on-the-boots days preoccupied with canals and roads to its present absorption with cyber-space and micromachines.

Fred Hapgood, M. Fred Collins.

Up the infinite corridor. Up the infinite corridor. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering - United States - History.

Reading the technical reports laying about, he became . In S. J. Parnes and . Harding (ed., A Source Book for Creative Thinking. Hapgood, Fred (1993). Up the Infinite Corridor: MIT and the Technical Imagination. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, p. 110, p. 113, p. 111.

Reading the technical reports laying about, he became interested in engineering. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, p. 127–138. Presented at the MIT Mid-America Conference, Chicago, February 16, 1957. Arnold, John E. (1962b). Howe, Hartley E. (1952). MIT and the technical imagination. Includes bibliographical references (p. 193-195) and index. A William Patrick book.

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Fred Hapgood, Up the Infinite Corridor: MIT and the Technical Imagination, (Reading, MA: Addison- Wesley, 1992). 9. Eugene S. Ferguson, Engineering and the Mind's Eye (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1992)

Fred Hapgood, Up the Infinite Corridor: MIT and the Technical Imagination, (Reading, MA: Addison- Wesley, 1992). Ferguson, Engineering and the Mind's Eye (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1992). 10. Panos Y. Papalambros and Douglass J. Wilde, Principles of Optimal Design: Modeling and Computation (Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1988). 11. William L. Chapman, A. Terry Bahill, and A. Wayne Wymore, Engineering Modeling and Design, (Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1992)

Up the Infinite Corridor waltzes deftly around this MIT culture, particularly as it intersects with the art of. .Hapgood writes well and has certainly grasped the essence of this national treasure.

Up the Infinite Corridor waltzes deftly around this MIT culture, particularly as it intersects with the art of engineering. The title refers to the long, tradition-drenched hallway that runs straight through several campus buildings, branching off to other corridors. Addison-Wesley: +1 (617) 944 3700. STREET CRED Smut By Any Other Name, and Proud Of It Einstein on the Beach Meets Eurydice.

An inside look at the engineering profession discusses the current research projects and the nerd culture of MIT, allowing readers to admire and appreciate the pioneering work of these all-too-often ridiculed scientists.
  • From the process of how a creative technical mind explores for answers, to the first computer hackers that grew out of the passions of the MIT model railroaders club (all three of my interests). I found it an interesting read - both times.

  • excellent

  • Hapgood didn't go to Tech. His brother did, and evidently told him plenty enough about it to get him interested in doing the research. At times the prose verges on poetry:

    "Engineers in those days [turn of the century--c. 1900] moved almost always through atmospheres of doubt and controversy. And it did not help very much that the thing that was said to be impossible while they were building was taken, when they had finished, to be a wonder. It is not surprising, therefore, that, having to trust their own private calculations of natural forces amid the incalculable noise of the crowd, they developed in time into independent, austere, and utterly self-confident men."

    "In their letters, anecdotes, and memoirs, there is not much humor, less wit, and very little hail-fellow-well-met. What does come through is respect for certain oft-mentioned abstract virtues...honesty, accuracy, fidelity. One of the type had carved on his tombstone only the word "Veritas," and truth in structure is what they all learned to live by. Here and there in their memoirs the members of the elite revealed the name of the power that allowed them to empty themselves into the moment, to pick out the flow of changes that counted, to read the meaning of a shift in temperature or intuit a pool of stress building in a shaft or rope; the power that set them apart and touched their small number with success. They called it a sense for `the fitness of things.'

    "A sense for the fitness of things was a gift, like any other extraordinary sense. It could not be taught; the old engineers were quite explicit on this point. Those who had it were engineers in their soul, even if they chose to throw away their legacy by going into law, whereas 30 years in the profession could not make those lacking the gift into engineers."

    Granted, it's not all this good, but plenty enough is. Brought back very pleasant memories to me of my time there.

  • A beautifully written, often poignant description of life at "the 'Tute." Hapgood is very effective at creating the atmosphere of life at MIT: it is, above all, intense. But it is also quirky, has people who are very bright doing things that are sometimes incomprehensible, and who are headstrong. Fortunately, he explains why this must be so, and he does it well.

    Parts are comical, parts bring a lump to my throat every time I read them. All of it's good. A friend said that he thought it a bit "gushy" about the place, but I, of course, disagree.

    A particularly good example:

    "Engineers in those days [fairly long ago] moved almost always through atmospheres of doubt and controversy. And it did not help very much that the thing that was said to be impossible while they were building was taken, when they had finished, to be a wonder. It is not surprising, therefore, that, having to trust their own private calculations of natural forces amid the incalculable noise of the crowd, they developed in time into independent, austere, and utterly self-confident men."

    He continues:

    "In their letters, anecdotes, and memoirs, there is not much humor, less wit, and very little hail-fellow-well-met. What does come through is respect for certain oft-mentioned abstract virtues...honesty, accuracy, fidelity. One of the type had carved on his tombstone only the word "Veritas," and truth in structure is what they all learned to live by. Here and there in their memoirs the members of the elite revealed the name of the power that allowed them to empty themselves into the moment, to pick out the flow of changes that counted, to read the meaning of a shift in temperature or intuit a pool of stress building in a shaft or rope; the power that set them apart and touched their small number with success. They called it a sense for 'the fitness of things.' "

    And finally:

    "A sense for the fitness of things was a gift, like any other extraordinary sense. It could not be taught; the old engineers were quite explicit on this point. Those who had it were engineers in their soul, even if they chose to throw away their legacy by going into law, whereas 30 years in the profession could not make those lacking the gift into engineers."

    The author, Fred Hapgood quotes much of the above from Elting Morison, a historian of engineering, but a lot is his alone. The stuff is uncommonly beautifully written; I'd love to have been able to say any of the above. But more to the point, if you change the word "engineer" to "surgeon," the meaning is still preserved. The book is great.

    I can't believe it's out of print.