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ePub A Rum Affair: A True Story Of Botanical Fraud download

by Karl Sabbagh

ePub A Rum Affair: A True Story Of Botanical Fraud download
Author:
Karl Sabbagh
ISBN13:
978-0306810602
ISBN:
0306810603
Language:
Publisher:
Da Capo Press; Reprint edition (August 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Science & Mathematics
ePub file:
1321 kb
Fb2 file:
1352 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf mbr azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
996

A Rum Affair: A True Story of Botanical Fraud. by Karl Sabbagh and Adam Nicolson. This is the story of what happened when a tenacious amateur set out to find out the truth, and how he uncovered a most extraordinary fraud.

A Rum Affair: A True Story of Botanical Fraud. An exciting scientific detective story' – Times Literary Supplement ‘A breezy ride. informative and amusing' – Washington Post Book World. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Rum Affair: A True Story of Botanical Fraud as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

A Rum Affair is an absorbing tale of scientific chicanery and academic intrigue-critically acclaimed and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

image All Image latest This Just In Flickr Commons Occupy Wall Street Flickr Cover Art USGS Maps. Heslop-Harrison, John William, 1881-1967, Fraud in science, Botanists. New York : Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

The story of the way that events then unfolded, or more accurately failed to unfold, is perhaps the .

The story of the way that events then unfolded, or more accurately failed to unfold, is perhaps the most important part of the book. Karl Sabbagh has done an amazing job unearthing the background to what happened, and drawing out the wider implications for science in society.

Karl Sabbagh; Adam Nicholson; Adam Nicholson. Book Format: Choose an option Sabbagh does a remarkable job outlining this complicated story. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. A Rum Affair : A True Story of Botanical Fraud. Book Format: Choose an option. A gripping tale of botanical fraud, and one which prompted me to make a three-day trip to the island described, which was one of the most fascinating experiences I've had in my life. Sabbagh does a remarkable job outlining this complicated story.

A True Story of Botanical Fraud. Sabbagh (Skyscraper, 1990) has succeeded in bringing this decades-old academic controversy to life, but his academic writing style sometimes slows the story down. As the tale unfolds, it becomes clear to both Raven and the reader that Harrison’s finds were actually planted.

Series: True Story of Botanical Fraud. Paperback: 296 pages. This one retains your interest until the end The story here is not enough for a full length book but Sabbagh, who is extraordinarily fair given his family connections, digs around until we end uup with a fascinating read which stitches up the suspect but with understanding and a little bit of British hypocrisy when it comes to fellow scientists.

Sabbagh's book Palestine (2006) interweaves a history of Palestine from the 18th century, with . A Rum Affair: A True Story Of Botanical Fraud (1999) (about the botanical fraud perpetrated by John William Heslop-Harrison). Power into Art (2000).

A Rum Affair: A True Story Of Botanical Fraud (1999) (about the botanical fraud perpetrated by John William Heslop-Harrison).

A Rum Affair is an absorbing tale of scientific chicanery and academic intrigueâ?”critically acclaimed and a finalist for the Los Angeles TimesBook Prize. In the 1940s, the eminent British botanist John Heslop Harrison proposed a controversial theory: Species of plants on the islands off the west coast of Scotland, he said, had survived the last Ice Age. His premise flew in the face of evidence that the last advance of the ice sheets extended well south of mainland Scotland, but he said he had proofâ?”the plants and grasses found on the Isle of Rumâ?”that would make his name in the scientific world. Harrison didn't anticipate, however, the tenacious John Raven, an amateur botanist who boldly questioned whether these grasses were truly indigenous to the area, or whether they had been transported there and planted. What seems at first a minor infringement of academic honesty soon becomes an enthralling tale of rival scientists and fraudulent science, a skillful whodunit that, in the hands of the talented Sabbagh, joins the ranks of the best narrative nonfiction.
  • This is another of many cases of fraud to prove some theory of evolution. Heslop-Harrison recognized the major problems with Darwinian evolution and, in response, attempted to substitute his own theory, as did many other scientists of the time. In the end, he was a supporter of a semi-Lamarckian process of evolution and used his experiments with moths and sawflies to attempt to support his theory. According to researcher Michael A. Salmon Heslop-Harrison claimed to have experimental evidence that physical changes in the life of a moth or sawfly could be passed on to its progeny. One example was Heslop-Harrison believed that melanism resulted from the effect of pollution on individual moths. This somehow altered their genes, which were passed on to their offspring. When others attempted to repeat his experiment, they always came up with different results. Fellow botanist, R.B. Cooke, accompanied Heslop-Harrison on many of his expeditions. Cooke's impressions of Heslop-Harrison claims include: "August 1936: I was shown a dozen or so scattered plants growing in a small piece of disturbed stony peaty ground ... I could not find a single plant of the Juncus ... apart from this piece of ground despite many hours search over ground in the vicinity which looked similar ..." Writing to George Taylor in 1955, Cooke said: "You may say what fools [Heslop-]Harrison must have thought us to be, or rather I should say I was. It was a very sad chapter in my life to be so taken in" by Hislop-Harrison's claims. In short, the evidence was planted in an attempt to prove one aspect of a theory of evolution, in this case related to the extent of the ice age (p. 21). In some ways this case parallels the Piltdown forgery. His book goes into more detail on the affair to Darwinism pages 176-183 and 235.

  • This is a very well written and entertaining book and a lesson to other writers covering cases where not a lot happens for the last half of the book. This one retains your interest until the end The story here is not enough for a full length book but Sabbagh, who is extraordinarily fair given his family connections, digs around until we end uup with a fascinating read which stitches up the suspect but with understanding and a little bit of British hypocrisy when it comes to fellow scientists. Even if you know nothing about plants this is worth the read

  • This book is about a series of probably fraudulent botanical observations that took place in the early part of the last century, the efforts of an amateur botanist to report on that fraud, and the apparent refusal of the community to take any action at the time. Since all parties are dead(perhaps making it easier to publish) there is little immediacy about the book.

  • Interesting story for plant lovers.

  • I love this book and thoroughly recommend it. It is very detailed and I can imagine some might feel that it is rather overladen with detail. But the detail is necessary to do justice to the complexity and seriousness of the question of whether or not the eminent British botanist John Heslop Harrington committed science fraud by importing and seeding the field of scientific discovery with species of plant, beetle and butterfly in order to claim the unique discovery of their unexpected capture on the Scottish isle of Rum.

    This is a scholarly book that is accessible to anyone of keen intellect with a tolerance for balanced evidence weighing, genteel writing and good manners. The author - Karl Sabbagh - has crafted his work well and written a gem-strewn masterpiece in the rare "did he do it?" science fraud genre.

    Despite giving over many pages to assess the obvious bias of his accusers, it is rather clear, I think, before we reach the end of the book that Sabbagh is certain his protagonist - Professor Heslop Harrington - at least committed some of the science frauds he was accused of.

    I must admit that after reading one sentence on page 93 that thereafter, and right to the end, I suspected a twist in the tale would be produced where we would learn that the Professor was in fact exonerated by the author's own discovery. But such heroic new evidence does not come.

    Consequently might I beg a breach of etiquette and wonder whether perhaps, if this review is ever drawn to his attention, Karl Sabbagh could use the comments section below it to answer a simple question. My question relates to what Sabbagh tells us on page 93 about"Kinloch Castle" built on the island or Rum by the wealthy George Bullough in 1900:

    'The estimated cost of the castle is said to be more than $20 million in today's money. Bullough thought nothing of importing red sandstone and soil from the Scottish mainland and workmen from Lancashire to build the house and establish the garden.'

    About the last of those two sentences, I'd like to ask Karl Sabbagh the following questions:

    Could the unexpected varieties of plant and butterfly that the Heslop Harrington and his associates found on Rum have been accidentally introduced by George Bullough importing their seeds and pupae in the said imported soil? Moreover, did Bullough also set up a fashionable garden water feature or dig a grand pond - complete with imported water plants from where foreign water beetles could so easily have have migrated to the islands lakes? What plants might have come to the island with the Lancashire gardeners?

    Why was this Bullough Contamination Hypothesis not examined in your superb book?

    Mike Sutton 24th May 2014