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ePub Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making (Third Edition) download

by Deborah Stone

ePub Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making (Third Edition) download
Author:
Deborah Stone
ISBN13:
978-0393912722
ISBN:
0393912728
Language:
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company; Third edition (December 16, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1367 kb
Fb2 file:
1594 kb
Other formats:
txt docx doc lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
972

Deborah Stone's "Policy Paradox" is an important work in the field of policy analysis. The subtitle is illuminating: "The Art of Political Decision Making.

Deborah Stone's "Policy Paradox" is an important work in the field of policy analysis. Her takeoff point is the following statement (pages x-xi): "This new field of policy analysis supposedly devoted to improving governance, was based on a profound disgust for the ambiguities and paradoxes of politics. In rational analysis, everything has one and only one meaning. In her own words, she (page xi) . .

The subtitle is illuminating: "The Art of Political Decision Making.wrote this book to Deborah Stone's "Policy Paradox" is an important work in the field of policy analysis.

Po policy paradox policy paradox: the art of political . This book has three aims

Po policy paradox policy paradox: the art of political decision making. W w norton & company new york london. 1)(1 W. W. Norton & Company has been independent since its (oun,lni ni r, 1 i, crcd William Warder Norton and Mary 1). Ilcrtcr Norton first l,nblished lei ter at the People's Institute, the adult education division of Nees stinue, pil libs'!, Union. This book has three aims. First, I argue that the rationality iu-owet misses the point of politics. From inside the rationality project, politics looks messy, foolish, erratic, and inexplicable.

All rights reserved Printed in the United States of America Cover art by Josef Albers, Structural Constellation, 195:3-58.

W, w, norton & company, new york, london. All rights reserved Printed in the United States of America Cover art by Josef Albers, Structural Constellation, 195:3-58.

PDF On Jan 1, 2006, Petković and others published Deborah Stone, Policy Paradox: The Art of.

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Clear, provocative, and engaging, Policy Paradox conveys the richness of public policy making and analysis. Extremely interesting & valid - very stimulating reading. com User, August 3, 2008. Very stimulating reading and very applicable in many kinds of negotiations & meetings, not just "policy making" as in government. Her thesis is the "most books" assume policy should be rational and analyze when it is not.

Policy Paradox The Art of Political Decision Making. Course: StuDocu Summary Library EN.

This post is 750 words plus a bonus 750 words plus some further reading that doesn’t count in the word count even though it does. Please see the Policy Analysis in 750 words series overview before reading the summary. This post is 750 words plus a bonus 750 words plus some further reading that doesn’t count in the word count even though it does.

The most accessible policy text available.

Policy making is a political struggle over values and ideas. By exposing the paradoxes that underlie even seemingly straightforward policy decisions, Policy Paradox shows students that politics cannot be cleansed from the process in favor of “rationality.” Author Deborah Stone has fully revised and updated this popular text, which now includes many paradoxes that have arisen since September 11. Examples throughout the book have been updated, and the prose has been streamlined to make a great read even better.
  • This is a fascinating and thought provoking book on political decision making. I have used it as a text in my doctoral course on policy analysis for nearly two decades.

    She juxtaposes two models in this book. (1) The rationality project. This is where we use rational approaches to policy making, including economic analysis. The idea is to use neutral and objective data to make the best policy decision possible.The model for society and its functioning is the market, with its emphasis on self-interest and rational calculation. (2) On the other hand, she points out that this does not describe the political world. Here (see the chart on page 35), we see that community is important (not just self-interest), altruism has a role to play, cooperation and competition coexist, and so on. Politics is an arena where there is contestation over facts, values, even numbers. There is no objective, neutral evaluation of facts. The very nature of the economic, rational approach is contested.

    The volume explores the debates between the political and rational models in such arenas as the goals for society, the nature of deciding on which problems should be addressed, and how solutions are addressed.

    This is a thought-provoking work that will leave readers thinking about the nature of policy making and what is at stake.

  • This book was required reading for a graduate social policy course. However, it is a book I reread after the course was over, as it (for me) increased my knowledge of social policy and interest in the topic as a social worker. This will remain on my bookshelf and be referenced often.

  • This book is a classic for good reason. It lays out concepts clearly, intelligently, and convincingly, all while sounding conversational and not overly technical, as is a pitfall of many academic publications. Stone's frameworks are just that--frameworks--and are useful for structuring one's analysis of policy, while also recognizing that no real world situation fits the frameworks perfectly.

    My one large critique of Stone is her extremely apparent liberal bias. While the ideas she presents are not inherently liberal or conservative (though one could certainly make the argument that the 'market model' she argues against is a conservative one and the 'polis model' she champions is a liberal one), the examples she draws to illustrate them are biased towards a liberal perspective. Whenever she presents something 'bad' done in a policy situation, it is almost always a Republican or conservative doing it, while liberal ideas and actions are almost always presented as the 'right thing' to do or a compassionate application of policy. Even as a liberal myself, it got a bit grating towards the end of the book. At times in certain chapters it seemed like Stone was soapboxing about an issue, even if that issue was only tangentially relevant to the topic at hand.

    If you can get past the bias, and perhaps only skim the examples she uses, there is still a lot to get out of this book.

  • Deborah Stone's "Policy Paradox" is an important work in the field of policy analysis. The subtitle is illuminating: "The Art of Political Decision Making." Her takeoff point is the following statement (pages x-xi): "This new field of policy analysis supposedly devoted to improving governance, was based on a profound disgust for the ambiguities and paradoxes of politics. . . . In rational analysis, everything has one and only one meaning." In her own words, she (page xi) ". . .wrote this book to critique the field and to capture, I hope, a more inspiring and humane kind of policy analysis."

    Her basic point is that the rational models drawn from economics do not explain very well how policy analysis works. Nor, in her view, should it be the actual model for decision making. She contends that economic rationality often gives way to political reality, to accommodation to conflicting interests, to compromise, to values other than economic efficiency (such as liberty, fairness, and so on).

    The introduction opens the book strongly, with Stone noting policy paradoxes, where the economic rational model does not prevail and explain how things work. She argues (page 13) that "each type of policy instrument [e.g., inducements, rules, rights, for example] is a kind of sports arena, each with its peculiar ground rules, within which political conflicts are continued." The first chapter continues the theme, by speaking of the market (economics) and the polis (politics), with a nice table summarizing key points on page 33). She concludes that (page 34) "Problems in the polis are never `solved' in the way that economic needs are met in the market model." Two different realms, and what works in the market may or may not work in the polis.

    The book proceeds in three major sections: Part II focuses on broad goals (e.g., equity, efficiency, security, liberty); Part III examines problems (with chapters labeled as follows: symbols, numbers, causes, interests, decisions); Part IV focuses on solutions (or tools or instruments, such as inducements, rules, facts).

    In the end, the book examines nicely the tensions between economic rational analysis of policy ideas and the messier but inescapable political process as it addresses policy issues. The reader will be provoked to think about important issues upon encountering Stone's perspective. A very useful work on the bigger picture of policy analysis.

  • Stone identifies four reasons for writing this book: 1) Rationality is a narrow conception of how humans think and feel; 2) the field of policy analysis is dominated by economics and its model of society as a market; 3) political science hasn't found a very convincing or satisfying explanation of how policy gets made; and 4) public policy and policy analysis worship objectivity and determinate rules (pp. xi, xii). With these observations, Stone sets out to unearth and describe the underlying assumptions and biases within analytic standards used to set goals, define problems, and judge solutions.

    An excellent introduction to policy making!